Tag Archives: WCC

This weekend in Warrandyte – February 29 – March 1

This leap year weekend has Warrandyte jumping for joy with a plethora of events happening to suit everyones’ tastes.

Run Warrandyte – Sunday March 1, 7:30am–10am

Over 300 people have signed up to take part in Warrandyte, nay Melbourne’s, premier fun run.
The weather on Sunday morning is looking very mild, which will make for perfect conditions to go for a 5km, 10km or 15km through The Pound.
If you have not already signed up this weekend: Saturday 9am–1pm outside Quinton’s IGA and Sunday 7am–7:30am at the Event Village at Warrandyte Reserve.
Course cut off times for the 10km have been extended, giving 10km runners 40 minutes to complete their first for two laps.
Gun time for the 15km is 8am, 10km is 8:10am, 5km is 8:15am and 2.2km is 8:20am.
The Under 8 run will begin at 9:30am, allowing parents a chance to run in the longer distances and get back in time to watch their children.
Ticketing prices are between $30 and $165 depending on event, age and number of entries.
See website for details.

A spot of cricket

The Bloods are getting to the end of the Home and Away Season.
The 2nd, 4th, and 7th XI are all sitting in contention for a spot in the finals and are all playing at home on Saturday.
The Seconds play Croydon Ranges on the main oval at Warrandyte Reserve.
The Fourths take on Templeton at Warrandyte High School oval.
The Sevenths take on Kilsyth on the back oval at Warrandyte Reserve.
All three matches begin at 1pm.

Weeping Grevillea birthday

Weeping Grevillea Nursery in Kangaroo Ground is celebrating the 25th birthday of Choco’s Hut.
The roadside — self-serve shop relies on an honest box to make it sales.
The Nursery is open 10am–4pm Saturday and Sunday, so go for a drive to Kangaroo Ground and check out the nursery, and help Choco’s Hut make a start on the next 25 years.

Health and Active Ageing Expo

Eltham High School hosts the inaugural Health and Active Ageing Expo this Sunday.
A collaboration between Nillumbik and Banyule Councils, the expo is a fun day out for older adults with over 50 exhibitors, food, fun activities, talks, meditation and more.
There is also a complimentary bus running between Eltham Station and the High School between 9:50am and 3:50pm.
Visit the expo page on Nillumbik Council’s website for full details.

Warrandyte Repair Café

The first Sunday of the month means it is time take your gadgets to meet their makers – so to speak –
Warrandyte Repair Café is on from 10:30am to 1pm, with locals putting their fixer skills to good work and helping you prolong the life of everything from torn clothes and damaged toasters, to computers, bicycles and bits of furniture.
Visit the WMIAA website for more details

Bloods bowled over as Pascoe marks 500th game

Trewella Sports Photography

In 1977, Steve J Pascoe was appointed Warrandyte Cricket Club’s first ever Senior Coach.
42 years later, Pascoe walked out onto Warrandyte Reserve to a guard of honour as the club marked his 500th game.
OAM, coach, life member, president, premiership winner, leader, club legend and mentor are just some of the descriptors used when talking about Warrandyte Cricket Club royalty “Stevie P”.
After the ceremony, Pascoe professed his thanks to all in attendance but reserved special and emotional thanks for a fellow Warrandyte legend; wife and 42-year former 1st XI scorer, Ann.
With the formalities complete and a few misty eyes in the crowd, the game commenced and many watched on in contemplation of the career of such a revered character in local cricketing folk-lore.
On what it means to play 500 games, Pascoe jokingly told the Diary “It means I’ve been playing cricket a long time.”
And his secret for cricketing longevity? “Don’t stop.”
He admitted that the guard of honour came as a welcome surprise.
“It struck me as just another day of cricket so it was a bit of a surprise,” he said.
On reflection of his career, Steve admits it’s been the games propensity for positive development and bringing people together that’s often struck him as a highlight.
“It’s an important physical and social outlet and I’ve met a lot of good people with varying degrees of ability because there’s always a grade for everyone to get into and contribute.”
Pascoe is obviously aware of his.
“Winning premierships is always the pinnacle I suppose, but I also got more involved in the administration early on.
“I’ve probably done more off the field than on the field in-regards to administration.
“I just like things running well.”
Close friend and fellow premiership team-mate John Chapman was on hand to summarise Pascoe’s extensive on and off-field CV.
Pascoe’s cricketing career begins before his move to Warrandyte, his first walk to the crease began with Norwood and the Under 16s in 1963.
A 156-game campaign in purple yielded 4050 runs and 502 wickets.

Coach Pascoe

His move to Warrandyte in 1977 was a turning point for the club.
With just three teams across the board, it fell to Steve to lead both Warrandyte’s top-flight side and the continued growth of the club.
He did just that, coaching the ‘Dyte to three 1st XI premierships and into the coveted Chandler Shield.
Flags in 1979/80, 1981/82 and another flag in 1983/84 marked a successful coaching tenure.
By the time he vacated the role, the club had grown to six Senior sides, six Junior sides, and a Womens’ side in the VWCA, which the club is striving to re-form.

On the field

Pascoe’s playing exploits were widely known and appreciated across the league; his competition batting award in 1979/80 was only beaten by the batting and bowling award double in the 1992/93 Chandler 2 season.
His club achievements include three-time 1st XI champion, three-time Senior club champion and seven-time batting award winner across the 1st, 2nd and 3rd XI, as well as five bowling awards.

A team player

His achievements on the pitch are rivalled only by his off-field contributions and passion for making the game a better one for all cricketers.
Over a combined period of 25 years he has served as Club President, Treasurer, Secretary and Chairman of Selectors.
If a role exists at the club it is likely Steve Pascoe has served in that capacity at one time or another.
He became a Club Legend in 1987 and a Life Member in 1990 for exceptional service both on and off the field, and exceptional service it has been.
Further recognition of his contribution to the club is seen every year at the Warrandyte Cricket Club Champion Award Night, renamed the Steve Pascoe Medal count in 2003.

RDCA

Pascoe joined the RDCA committee in 1975 as Secretary.
He served for 11 years in the role before shifting into the Vice Presidency in 1988, again serving for 11 years until he was named President of the Association in 1999 – a position he held for six years.
When he finished up in 2005, RDCA Life Member Stuart Newey noted in the Annual of that year that Pascoe’s “strong conviction” was an important part in bringing about better playing conditions for all players.
“Steve has played a significant part in many reforms aimed at improving cricket playing conditions and the standard of cricket played in the RDCA.
“The position (President) requires a person of strong conviction to take the role… it is obvious that Steve is such a person.”

On the national and international stage

Pascoe was awarded an Order of Australia Medal in 2016, for exceptional service to the game of cricket.
His overseas endeavours have even seen him play cricket on all but two continents, in places such as Barcelona and Florence.
This includes a Crusaders tour of England where he met the Queen.

56 years not out

Nowadays, Steve continues to umpire high-grade cricket, a role for which he was awarded 2015-2016 RDCA Umpire’s Association Umpire of the Year.
His involvement with the club remains strong, being heavily involved in the In2Cricket program for young cricketers and continuing to impart his extensive knowledge, along with Ann, who both recently held club masterclasses in umpiring and scoring.
And of course, he’s still playing Over 60s cricket with his mates.
At Warrandyte, there is not a lot Steve Pascoe has not done over the course of his 500 games.
Universally loved and revered by all, his laid-back persona carries an unmistakable gravitas to everyone that knows him.

Steve Pascoe
Warrandyte stats overview

Games: 500
Runs: 11,110
Batting Ave: 36.55
Overs: 3,752.4
Wickets: 479
Bowling Ave: 21.71
Catches: 137

 

Milestone match for Warrandyte Reserve

Photos: Bill Mcauley

Warrandyte’s home of cricket reached a special milestone when the 2nd XI took to the field in Round 2 for Warrandyte Cricket Clubs 1000th senior game at the venue.

Campbell Holland’s men made history against Lilydale as the 1000th senior side to play a competitive game of cricket on the main oval.

The twos rose to the occasion on a proud day for the club.

Set 173 to win, they chased down the total with overs to spare and only four down for a six-wicket victory and incidentally, the clubs 470th on the WCG.

It was a fitting result for the mainstay of the Warrandyte sporting community.

The ground, steeped in local cricketing folklore, has seen the entire scope of possibilities you could imagine in the game of cricket.

Bloods premierships, outrights, reverse outrights, no less than three 1st XI relegation saving nail-biters, several facility renovations and a who’s who of Warrandyte Cricket Club legends who have graced the green turf.

WCG history

The grounds history dates back as early as the goldfields era, where social games were played by locals, including Warrandyte cricketing pioneers Walter Charles Brackenbury and William Collins.

Its earliest mention in publication came in an article by the Bell’s Life in Victoria newspaper about a match between Andersons Creek (now Warrandyte) and Caledonia (now St Andrews) on New Year’s Day, 1864.

The game was described as being played on “the picturesque ground of the latter,” referring to the Reserve.

Competitive cricket was first played at Warrandyte in 1905, when the club was part of the Cameron Cricket Association.

The inaugural side found the going tough in a low scoring affair which handed them their first defeat, a reverse-outright, against Christmas Hills.

A humbling beginning for the club at home but not without its positives as John Till took 6/5 in a fine bowling display, hoping to set a competitive tone for a bloods side in its infancy.

The WCG has played host to cricketing royalty, most notably in the Centenary match against the Victorian Cricket Association in 1956.

Warrandyte’s finest competed against a star-studded VCA side, including Australian cricketers of the day in Jack Iverson, Colin McDonald, Lindsay Kline and legendary Aussie opening batsman Bill Ponsford.

Club legends

Many players have spent their Saturdays on the turf at Bloods central but only a select few have really turned the oval into happy hunting grounds.

The highest wicket-taker at home is none other than the mercurial Gerald Walshe, who sent 335 victims back to the pavilion over the course of his 30-year career.

The White family name and Warrandyte Reserve go hand-in-hand, with legendary batsman Robert White’s 3097 runs on the ground eclipsed only by his son Adams 3178.

Warrandyte stalwart Dave Mooney comes in at third on the all-time Warrandyte Reserve runs list and has graced the coveted turf the most out of any player in Bloods history, 165 times over the course of his career.

Premiership spoils

In 113 years, only 55 men have had the pleasure of claiming a premiership victory on the ground itself.

Warrandyte’s inaugural premiership side of 1906/07 took out the A-grade flag in a historic game against Yarra Glen.

The 4th XI side of 2006/07 found success in the K-Grade Grand Final thanks in part to Josh McKellars 6/36 to take the game away from Olinda.

Two years later on the same ground, the 5th XI romped to a 125-run victory against Norwood to claim the M-Grade pennant.

Grand Final cricket returned to the oval seven years later when the 5th XI advanced to the J-Grade decider against Templeton, securing a tightly fought game by 10 runs after posting just 125 in the first innings, with wickets to Aaron Dean and a crucial catch at short cover for the last wicket by skipper Nathan Croft the deciding factors.

A year later the 4th XI made it back-to-back WCC titles at home in the F-Grade decider, this time finding a comfortable win against Heathmont Baptist by 80 runs on the back of a Dan Wellesley century and four wickets Dean Gidley.

In recent times, a fateful Jake Sherriff hat-trick at the ground would propel the 1st XI to the Bill Wilkins decider, where the “First’s” 31-year premiership drought was broken in emphatic fashion.

A growing family

The club started with a single team back in 1905 but just 50 metres down the road, a new chapter was written in the history of the club at the younger Warrandyte Reserve #2 with the club’s inaugural 7th XI recording their first victory, a remarkable result no-one may have predicted at the inception of the club all the way back in 1855.

Nowadays, the ground is home to 10 juniors teams, three veterans sides and the seven senior teams that make up the Warrandyte Cricket Club and as of Round 2, the clubs stat-line at the ground stands at 470 wins, 368 losses, 7 ties, 51 no result matches and 104 unrecorded games with a winning percentage of 58 percent.

Warrandyte Reserve and the WCC have been enter-twined entities for 1000 games, and with such a strong core of players, young and old, the WCG promises to proudly remain the clubs home base for 1000 games to come.

Family talent Poole runs deep

 

Most families are proud to boast just one child playing high-level sport at a young age. Other families, such as the Pooles, are lucky enough to possess three. Brothers Brady (13), Darcy (16) and Jack (19) have established themselves as cornerstone members of Warrandyte’s cricket program, all playing roles in the First and Second XI for the Bloods.

The trio recently reached significant milestones within the local cricketing landscape for different reasons.

The brothers were first the talk of the town when they were all named to play together for the Second XI at the beginning of the season, before Brady made further waves when he became the youngest player in club history to run out for the Firsts aged just 13.

“We started off the year in the Twos – at the start of the season Dad said there was a huge announcement about it at the team selection – it was a big surprise that Brady was playing Twos because he played Sixes last year, and it was a really big deal that we played on the same side because we play so much cricket here in the backyard. It’s really great playing with each other,” said Darcy Poole.

After all playing together for the Second XI, Brady was eventually named in the Firsts, an honor that wasn’t lost on the young all-rounder.

“It was a big deal – I didn’t really expect it to be honest – certainly at the start of the season I didn’t expect to; just to be playing with people who have played at a good level of cricket, a level I want to play at when I’m older it’s a big deal to me.

“It’s different, there’s more persistent play.

“You play against some really good players who have had good careers in cricket and then come back down to a local level — it’s not too huge a jump from the Seconds, but it’s noticeable,” Brady says.

One of the major benefits of playing up the order for the boys has been the opportunity to play and work with club coach Jake Sherriff, which both brothers consider a massive benefit.

“When I first played with him that was one of the biggest things, playing with someone who has played district cricket; but even last year when I was in the Sixes, which is the lowest division, he was still coming down and telling me how to improve my game,” Brady said.

The family’s progression is made more remarkable when you consider just how young they are and how much experience they lack.

Both Darcy and Brady have just four years of cricket under their belt, and even less senior cricket exposure.

Despite this, both players are logging strong individual and team performances.

“I’m a batsman, I don’t really bowl much, personally I made 87 earlier this year just before Xmas,” Darcy says.

“I’m more of a bowler, and sometimes bat, but not usually in the seniors – I don’t have too many standout games, I haven’t had the standout performances like Darce – I’ve probably had more success keeping teams playing the way we want them to play,” Brady says.

The journey the brothers have taken to becoming talented cricketers began with Jack, who as the eldest was able to influence his younger siblings.

“We both started playing at the same time because Jack forced us to go down to training – it was after Christmas a while back and we had just started playing backyard cricket — he told us to come down see what is like and we haven’t stopped since,” Darcy says.

“Before we started playing cricket we didn’t even think about it, we thought it was boring, Dad would be watching it and we thought “why would you watch tha”, but we started to get into it and now we can’t stop,” Brady says.

Warrandyte Cricket Club are certainly glad that the brothers made the decision to pick up the bat and ball, and with youngest brother Oscar — aged 11 — still waiting in the wings, the Pooles may soon have another superstar wearing the baggy whites at Warrandyte Reserve.