Tag Archives: Warrandyte State Park

Planned burn in Warrandyte

UPDATED: Thursday March 24

FOREST FIRE Management Victoria (FFMVic) will be conducting a planned burn at Pigtail Track in Warrandyte State Park this Saturday, March 26.

This 10.9 hectare bushfire risk reduction burn is on the eastern edge of Warrandyte State Park.

Walking tracks in Warrandyte State Park in and near the burn area will be closed to the public, smoke will be visible in the area and FFMVic are expecting the smoke to move towards the south Saturday morning, then towards the north and north east later in the day, which will mean it may be smoky in Warrandyte township and could drift towards houses as the wind changes.

See map for burn area.

If there is visible smoke in the area it is advisable to close doors and windows and take any necessary health precautions.

Map courtesy FFMVic

Stay informed about planned burning

Sign up forautomated notifications about planned burns near you at Planned Burns Victoria www.vic.gov.au/plannedburns
Visit www.ffm.vic.gov.au
Call the VicEmergency Hotline on freecall 1800 226 226
Download the Vic Emergency app to see the location of ignited burns.
Callers who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech/communication impairment can contact the VicEmergency Hotline via the National Relay Service on 1800 555 677.

Parks closures

The Warrandyte Diary has been informed that Warrandyte State Park visitor sites have been closed due to danger from high winds.

According to an email from Parks Victoria sent to registered Volunteer Groups and Tour Operators,  Jumping Creek Reserve, Normans Reserve, Koornong Reserve and Pound Bend are currently closed to the public, and are scheduled to reopen on Thursday, September 3.

There are damaging winds warning in effect across South East Victoria and as many will have seen, during daily activity following the storm o Thursday, and from notifications on the Vic Emergency app today, trees are coming down.

Stay safe out there today!

Community fun run back for another lap

From left: Michelle Bean (Run Warrandyte), Tracy Channon (Netball President), Phil Treeby (Run Warrandyte), Bill Stubbs (Cricket President) Jason Smith (Senior Footy President). Absent: Travis Reddaway (Junior Footy President) and David Dyason (Run Warrandyte).

THE PREMIER running event in every Warrandyte runner’s heart, Run Warrandyte, is back for another lap (or three).

The ninth iteration of the annual event, will be held on Sunday, March 1 and has nominated Guide Dogs Victoria as its official charity partner, allowing participants the opportunity to fundraise to help the charity raise the money needed to breed and train a four-legged companion for those who are vision impaired.

It costs approximately $50,000 to breed and train just one guide dog.

The run is also a great opportunity to raise money for the Warrandyte Sporting Group with a combination of runner fundraising and profits from the run going towards important projects at the Warrandyte Sports Club.

Run Warrandyte Committee member, Michelle Bean, spoke to the Diary about the run and how it has contributed to the Sporting Group over the past eight years.

“To date we have raised a total of $53,000.

“These funds have been put towards past projects such as the new electronic scoreboard.

“Future projects include court and field lighting upgrades, as well as assisting in the enhancement of player training and wellbeing,” she said.

Run Warrandyte 2020 is also doing its part for the environment — the run is making steps to becoming a zero waste event.

Before the event, the committee is encouraging participants to not print their registration confirmations when they come to collect their bibs, instead showing a copy of the confirmation on your smartphone will suffice.

On the day, water on course will be provided in biodegradable cups and packaging, and participants and their families are encouraged to bring their own water bottles or collapsible cups for use during the event, these items are also available to purchase through the event registration website.

The event distances of 2.2, 5, 10 and 15 kilometres will follow the same course as the previous two years, offering 5–15km runners the opportunity to run through picturesque bushland in The Pound.

With assistance of the Day family, these runners will get an opportunity to run a unique course not normally accessible to the public.

“Numbers for the event continue to grow and the committee receive great joy in playing a part in providing a fun day for the community.

“The committee is ever grateful to the major sponsors that help make the event happen including, Warrandyte Community Bank, The Grand Hotel, Goldfields Family Medical Centre, Charlie Bins, Harding Swift Caravan Services, Ringwood Warrandyte Osteo, Quinton’s IGA, Johnstone Reimer Lawyers and Project Clothing,” said Michelle.

With distances catering for all ages and ability levels, Run Warrandyte is the ideal community event to get active and experience the wonderful Warrandyte bushland that surrounds our town.

True ‘friends’ of our state park

THE Friends of Warrandyte State Park (FOWSP) is a volunteer-based group that understands the importance of growing indigenous plants in our gardens. We can’t underestimate the group’s value to the community.

The nursery grows plants indigenous to the area not only to conserve these important species but also to try and encourage people to plant them in their own gardens. Too often we see garden runaways such as Pittosporum and Agapanthus invading the territory of beautiful native orchids, Eucalypts and other natural splendours.

‘Friends’ groups such as our Warrandyte team are of such value to the priceless bushland in our area.

They never get tired of pulling weeds and planting important indigenous plants around the park. The habitat created and improved by FOWSP will continue to house all types of native creatures from phascogales and sugar gliders to powerful owls; even the native bees are taken good care of.

Linda Rogan, an active member of FOWSP, reflects upon her time volunteering and believes she has “found a wonderful supportive community of people from various backgrounds, including enthusiastic youngsters as well as us elders, all with the common goal of supporting the State Park, the rangers and the local flora and fauna”. She says “FOWSP is now an important part of my active life”.

Linda joined FOWSP with the intention of “learning more about our indigenous flora and to do something positive for our local natural environment” and ended up becoming the newsletter editor and finding herself immersed in learning about the state park.

FOWSP has had many successes around the park including creating a wetland frog habitat near the nursery and revegetating many disturbed areas.

From my own personal experience it is so rewarding being part of this team. Every time I go out with them I feel like I have given something back to the environment and an area, which I enjoy visiting often.

As a great bonus the people are amazing and so much fun to be around and the morning tea is always astounding.

The state parks in Warrandyte are an integral piece in a much larger puzzle. The importance of it being looked after for rare and endangered plants and animals and also for the enjoyment of you all in Warrandyte is greater than I can describe in this article. You’ll have to go out into the park, enjoy the company of the wallabies and and feel the change in the air to appreciate its true significance.

The nursery is open to the public and to anybody who wishes to volunteer on Thursdays from 9.30am until 12.30pm and on the first weekend of every month when the Warrandyte Community Market is on.

For more info visit fowsp.org.au