Tag Archives: Templestowe

Development a tall order?

YOUR LOCAL shopping strip or centre might look very different in the next decade as Manningham Council begins community consultation on the look and feel of the municipality’s Neighbourhood Activity Centres (NACs) as part of its response to the significant population increase projected by the State Government.
Council has identified nine NACs:

  • Bulleen Plaza
  • Donburn
  • Doncaster East Village (Devon Plaza)
  • Jackson Court
  • Macedon Square/Plaza
  • Park Orchards
  • Templestowe Village
  • Tunstall Square
  • Warrandyte Goldfields

In its Victoria in Future 2023 report, the State Government predicts the state’s population will grow from its current 6.8 million to 10.3 million by 2051; the metropolitan/region split predicts growth in Metropolitan Melbourne will increase from 5.1M to 8M in this period, and from 1.7M to just 2.3M in regional Victoria.
Manningham is expected to have an influx of an additional 18,300 residents by 2036, taking its population to 144,120 and, compared with neighbouring Nillumbik, which is expected to gain an extra 3,970 residents (to 67,420) in the same period.
Manningham’s other more suburban municipal neighbours, Banyule and Maroondah, are predicted to increase by 21,490 and 17,490, respectively.
The bottom line is that the State Government sees the population growth in the state is likely to be focused in Metropolitan Melbourne, and the suburbs will bear the brunt of this population increase as significant new housing is needed.
Manningham, for example, needs to build an additional 8,000 homes to accommodate the 18,000+ residents.
New homes need to be balanced or complemented by access to nature, essential services, public transport, hospitals, and education, and both the State Government and local councils are exploring ways to do this.
One part of this is the Activity Centre Design Concepts community consultation, which is open for feedback — via a survey — until June 16.
The survey asks whether you agree or disagree with aspects of your local NAC, such as subterranean parking, the amount of natural light, and footpaths/cycleways.
Manningham Mayor Carli Lange said:

“We want to hear from the community on how we can best accommodate growth and development while ensuring that our activity centres and surrounding neighbourhoods maintain their liveability.
“If you’re a resident, chances are you regularly visit at least one of our vibrant activity centres across the municipality.
“We want to ensure that they continue to provide desirable destinations for people to live, shop, work and play — offering a range of retail, office and business opportunities, housing, community and education facilities.”

However, the most contentious detail of the Design Concepts is the proposed building height changes.
The document notes six development typologies in Manningham, ranging from single-storey “fine grain” development, such as the Donburn shopping strip, to high-rise housing, eight storeys, in areas such as Doncaster Hill.
The Design Concepts document states:

“It is proposed to support building heights of 4-6 storeys throughout our neighbourhood activity centres, with strategic redevelopment sites identified for up to eight storeys.
In keeping with the existing character of Warrandyte Goldfields and Park Orchards it is proposed to allow for heights up to 3-4 storeys.
This height will provide for growth and development beyond the current single or double storey character, while ensuring an appropriate transition to the public realm and sensitive interfaces”.

MN Bulletin contacted the Park Orchards Ratepayers Association (PORA) for feedback on the proposed potential growth of the Park Road/Hopetoun Road NAC.
A PORA Spokesperson provided this response:

“PORA has been absolutely blindsided by Council’s ‘consultation’ (or total lack thereof) regarding the Neighbourhood Activity Centres.
However, PORA has been actively involved in communication with the Manningham Council regarding many other issues we now face in this area in the last 10 months.
These communications have involved face-to-face meetings by appointment at the Manningham Council offices.
At no time were any of these issues raised by any representative of Manningham Council present.
Looking at Manningham Council’s initial consultation, the local Park Orchards area was never actively consulted, and Park Orchards was never identified as being considered a Neighbourhood Activity Centre.
We were grouped in with responses from Warrandyte and Wonga Park.
Given that surveys were conducted in Warrandyte, it stands to reason that input from Park Orchards and Wonga Park residents would be minimal to non-existent.
Looking at Manningham Council’s Liveable City Strategy Results summary, the Park Orchards area was never identified as a Neighbourhood Activity centre.
Consultation was not offered or given locally to the Park Orchards area.
The Liveable City Strategy report by Manningham Council shows that the Park Orchards area is now identified as a Neighbourhood Activity Centre.
Where is the basis for this inclusion, considering no consultation has effectively taken place in the area of Park Orchards? How did Park Orchards go from not being a Neighbourhood Activity Centre in the Liveable City Strategy Results summary to being declared a Neighbourhood Activity Centre in the Liveable City Strategy report?
The number of total submissions was 360 across Manningham.
The total population of Manningham is estimated to be approximately 130,000 people.
The number of submissions is woefully disproportionate to the number of residents these proposed outcomes will affect.
There is so much more to this; we haven’t even discussed building heights and building areas, the effectiveness of Council-initiated building ‘guidelines’, and the strength of existing overlays.
Overlays that are controlled by the State Government, who is also working with Council to push these initiatives through.
The same State Government has recommended that current residents who may be directly affected by medium-density housing projects have their rights to object removed.
The same State Government has also put local councils on notice regarding any failure to issue building approvals based on a numbers outcome.
All residents have a decision to make.
How much do they value their current neighbourhood amenity?”

The State Government has pledged to build 80,000 homes in Victoria in the next 10 years, and it will be up to local governments to make that happen.
Now is the time to have our say The first stages of determining where these new homes go are in the bones of surveys such as the Activity Centre Design Concepts survey.
We all need to ask ourselves what housing in our street, suburb, NAC—wherever we are in Manningham—looks like now and what we want it to look like in the coming decades.
There are numerous surveys circulating at the moment which will, ultimately, contribute to housing outcomes over the next decade.

The Victoria in Future 2023 report can be found at planning.vic.gov.au/guides-and-resources/data-and-insights/victoria-in-future.
What do you think? Email bulletin@warrandytediary.com.au.

Public meeting in Park Orchards

PORA has convened a public meeting on Tuesday, May 28, to discuss a number of issues/strategies/policies impacting Park Orchards residents, these include:

  • The Park Orchards Chalet
  • Manningham Residential Strategy
  • Neighbourhood Activity Centre Design Concepts

The meeting will take place at 7:30pm at St Anne’s Primary School, Knees Road.

RVMs arrive in Manningham

THE STATE-managed Container Deposit Scheme (CDS) has been running in Victoria for over one month.
But in Manningham, generally, the scheme has been slow to start, mainly due to a lack of refund points.
There are three ways to return refundable containers: Over The Counter (OTC) Depot Reverse Vending Machine (RVM) Until recently, the only options available — locally — to residents in the greater Warrandyte area were a few OTC locations, and the nearest Depot and RVM were both in Bayswater.
With Manningham slated for up to 10 RVMs across the municipality — including Warrandyte Reserve and Mullum Mullum Stadium — the rollout, to date, of convenient places to return eligible containers has been disappointing.
The responsibility is squarely in the lap of the Operator, Visy, who has until August 2024 to bring the operation up to standard.
By then, Zone Operators will need at least one collection point per 14,500 people in metropolitan areas, at least one per town of 750 people in regional areas, and at least one per town of 350 people in remote areas.
Residents looking to refund their bags or boxes of containers have good news: the first RVM in Manningham is now in operation at Rieschiecks Reserve, 125-149 George Street, Doncaster East.
Manningham Mayor, Councillor Carli Lange, was at the site for the official launch of the RVM and encouraged community members to take advantage of the opportunity.
“We all need to work together to take responsibility for how we dispose of waste.
“Let’s improve our recycling efforts while supporting a sustainable future and the local economy along the way.
“Our recycling actions create products for future generations and ongoing sustainability for our community,” Cr Lange said.
Cr Lange was joined by Deputy Mayor Laura Mayne, Director City Services Rachelle Quattrocchi, Visy Co-owner Fiona Geminder, Visy CEO Mark De Wit, Visy Executive General Manager Wayne Russell, and Visy General Manager Container Deposit Scheme Tim O’Donnell (pictured).
The reverse vending machines are automated, purpose-built and can capture up to 10,000 eligible containers per day.
They can be used from 7am to 8pm daily and include acoustic panels for soundproofing and external lighting for enhancing safety and security.
RVMs will help make recycling more convenient and accessible, said Mr O’Donnell.
“The Manningham community has already embraced CDS Vic in its first few weeks, returning containers through OTCs and depots.
“Reverse vending machines are another way for sports and community clubs to be rewarded for recycling, as every bit counts when it comes to fundraising efforts.”

Residents Yukon and Lucas (pictured right) were the first to use the RVM and said they found the machine very easy to use. Charities and Community Groups can register as a partner through the cdsvic.org.au. Once registered, they will appear as a donation partner in the CDS Vic app.
Presently, Wonga Park Cricket Club, Templestowe Football Club, Park Orchards BMX Club, Park Orchards Lions Club, Parks Orchards Junior Football Club, and Doncaster Baseball Club are among the 400+ charities and groups signed up to receive donations.
The community can choose to receive their refund via an electronic transfer through the downloadable CDS Vic North app, a voucher, or as a donation to a charity or community group.
“This initiative rewards recycling and allows used cans, bottles and other eligible containers to be repurposed into new products,” Cr Lange said.
“I’m confident that having the reverse vending machines in such convenient locations locally will significantly reduce litter and deliver positive community fundraising and environmental outcomes.”

A fresh new disc golf course for Ruffey Lake Park

A NEW, permanent Disc Golf course will open at Ruffey Lake Park in early February.
The course has been closed for two weeks during January to complete the upgrade.
The new course will feature 18 holes with nine launch pads and a practice basket, and new course signage.
With a dual design, players can complete the course in two laps.
Manningham Mayor Deirdre Diamante said Council is aware the disc golf course at Ruffey Lake is well used.
“This upgrade will improve that experience for both our growing disc golf community and our visitors.
“We’re investing in a facility that supports our community to be outside, active, and connected,” she said.
The previous six-hole course was run as a trial in Ruffey Lake Park, and has now been upgraded to a permanent 18-hole course as part of the Ruffey Lake Park Landscape Masterplan 2021.
Manningham Council is delivering the upgrade in partnership with the Victorian Government.
Ruffey Lake Park’s public course is suitable for beginner through to advanced players of all ages and is free to play with no bookings required.
Discs can be borrowed from the Doncaster Library at 687 Doncaster Road, Doncaster.
For further information, go to manningham.vic.gov.au/disc-golf.

Communities dig in on National Tree Day

NATIONAL Tree Day made a triumphant return on July 31, with events all around the country hosted by a multitude of groups.
In Manningham and Nillumbik, Councils used the opportunity to include the community in some of their more ambitious planting projects at Ruffey Lake and Challenger Reserve, respectively.

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In Diamond Creek, nearly 1,200 indigenous trees and shrubs were planted.
Nillumbik Mayor Cr Frances Eyre thanked the community for “coming out and getting muddy”.
She said the planting will help to improve water quality while strengthening the habitat value of the wetland.

“A shout-out to the wonderful volunteers from Rotary Club of Eltham and Diamond Creek Men’s Shed who helped make the morning a success,” Cr Eyre said.

Wayne Green, Cub Scout Leader for 2nd Eltham Sea Scouts, attended the Nillumbik event and provided the Bulletin with this report:

“Tree Planting Day was awesome today at the Challenger Street Wetlands.
Tim and Helen and others from the Council, you were amazing.
Thanks, Men’s Shed, for putting on a great BBQ at the end and Rotary, for pointing the way.
In attendance were a ton of amazing councillors competing to plant the most number of plants.
This whole shebang started in 2003 with a $180,000 grant and is reaping huge benefits for all of us.
My family and I love this — and Scouting and Guiding also really appreciate it.
What is not to like?
Free food.
Great weather.
Interesting conversation and sore muscles.
Walking home, my 17-year-old son hugged me and said, ‘Dad, I love doing stuff with you like this’.
He is a great kid, and I am a proud dad, having the opportunity to have such free fun provided by the Council and so many great community groups.
As Helen pointed out, today’s planting will help save lizards, butterflies and small birds like wrens.
Oh, and a very big thank you to Edendale Farm.
The native plants are amazing.”

Manningham Mayor Cr Michelle Kleinert, Deputy Mayor Deirdre Diamante and Cr Anna Chen

At Ruffey Lake Park, over 400 people attended the event to help Council reach their planting target of 1,200 seedlings along the Ruffey Lake corridor, achieving their goal in under two hours.
Manningham Mayor Cr Michelle Kleinert said this year’s event exceeded their expectations.

We normally see around 200 people at this event.
“We were blown away by the turnout and thank every community member who came along to join the fun,” she said.

Council hosts the annual event, providing all volunteers with the necessary tools, equipment and plants.
Council also thanked the Rotary Club of Doncaster, who provided a free sausage sizzle.

“It’s a very wholesome event.
“It feels good to give back, get outside and be hands-on in the dirt!
“I think that’s why we always see such a diverse crowd; it’s an event that everyone can enjoy,” said Cr Kleinert.

Another blitz for Fitzsimons Lane project

AS THE FITZSIMONS Lane project begins another major phase, motorists are warned that major disruptions will be occurring as a section of Porter Street is closed for around six weeks.
Major Road Projects Victoria’s Project Director Dipal Sorathia said creating a more reliable Porter Street junction is one of the biggest priorities for the Fitzsimons Lane Upgrade team.
New traffic lights will be installed at a Porter Street intersection in Templestowe to deliver a safer and more efficient crossing for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians.
Removing the Fitzsimons Lane/Porter Street roundabout will ensure better traffic flow for all road users and will help clear a significant bottleneck and improve safety.
Construction crews will work around-the-clock for seven weeks, from 6pm Tuesday, April 26 to 5pm Sunday, June 12, to remove the roundabout and install traffic lights, with associated kerb and channel works, drainage works, build footpaths, earthworks, pavement replacement, line-marking and lighting.
“We thank locals for their patience as we get on with this upgrade and complete about six months’ worth of work over the next seven weeks,” said Mr Sorathia.
He said this intersection is one of the busiest in Templestowe.
“As traffic volumes return to pre-pandemic levels, congestion during the morning and afternoon peaks regularly leads to queuing — causing delays, frustration and distress.”
Mr Sorathia said replacing the Porter Street roundabout with traffic lights will reduce congestion for the more than 60,000 vehicles which use Fitzsimons Lane every day and make the community safer.
Two lanes of traffic will remain open on Williamsons Road/Fitzsimons Lane in both directions when works kick off on Tuesday, April 26.
Temporary traffic lights will guide north-south motorists through the intersection.
During this first phase of these works through to Saturday, May 14 — the eastern leg of the Porter Street roundabout will be closed, meaning traffic will need to detour via Foote Street/Reynolds Road, Blackburn Road and Warrandyte Road.
Access to nearby businesses, Templestowe Reserve and BlueCross Silverwood will be maintained.
Maps describing the detour in place can be found below:
Click on maps below slideshow for large-scale version

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A second stage of works will be carried out over the remainder of May and into June, with one lane to re-open for those travelling from Eltham turning left into the eastern leg of Porter Street towards Warrandyte.
With restrictions on traffic movements throughout the entirety of the major works period, motorists are encouraged to plan ahead and allow extra time for their journey.
Delays of approximately 20-minutes are expected along detour routes although access through the closed road will be maintained for emergency vehicles and public transport.
Pedestrian and cyclist access has been maintained on select shared paths however, some verge areas are fenced off to ensure the safety of road workers.
A pedestrian detour is in place through Templestowe Reserve.
The temporary roundabout will be removed, and the upgraded intersection will be open by early June.
Finishing works — including asphalting, line- marking and signage works — will continue throughout 2022.
The upgrade will also improve the reliability of public transport with the introduction of bus prioritisation signalling.
Once traffic lights are installed at Porter Street, the project team will then turn their attention to major construction to upgrade the Foote Street intersection in Templestowe.
For more information or to sign up for updates, visit roadprojects.vic.gov.au/fitzsimons.
For up-to-date travel information visit:
ptv.vic.gov.au and vicroads.vic.gov.au.

Macedon traders unsatisfied

MACEDON Square’s proposed streetscape upgrade has been in the works for over a year, with traders fighting to keep the centre functional and safe.
In August 2020, Manningham Council released two concept designs aiming to upgrade Macedon Square, one with an open space plan (Option B) and one without (Option A). Traders and community members identified several sore points in the proposed plans, leading Council to prolong consultation and work alongside community members to address these issues.
Four key areas were identified for improvement: parking, safety, accessibility, and other design features. “Consulting with the community is a top priority for Council,” Director City Planning and Community, Angelo Kourambas, told WD Bulletin.
Officers created a revised plan based on this feedback, which was endorsed by Council in its September 28 Ordinary Council Meeting.
However, traders in the centre are still left unsatisfied. Gary Cyganek, owner of Egons Bakery and representing the Macedon Square traders, spoke with WD Bulletin about the points of contention in the revised plan.
“All they’ve done is revise the plan we’ve rejected.
“We feel safety has been compromised,” he said. Although the revised concept design increases road widths along Macedon Road (5.6 metres) compared to prior plans, traders are unsettled by any narrowing of the road at all. Council will also install a 0.6m wide central traffic median to limit east/west car movements along Macedon Road. Traders are apprehensive about the prospective narrowing of the road, due to fears of potential safety hazards, increased collisions, and congestion.
“I think it’s still very dangerous on the road, which is our number one priority.
“By narrowing the road you’re putting people closer to moving vehicles when they’re loading and unloading their car.
“We know the feedback from our customers — they don’t like the congestion [in the centre] and this is going to make it worse.”
Mr Cyganek goes on to say the traders are not convinced the restructuring of the road will create any benefit to Macedon Square patrons and traders alike.
“We’re going to call for an independent TAC report because we feel we need to be shown that this will be best practice, because we just can’t see it.
“We feel this is not functional nor is it safe,” Mr Cyganek says.
In the September 2021 engagement report, Council re- surveyed the community, prompting individuals to choose between Option A, Option B or Option C.
19 per cent voted for Option A (without open space), 56 per cent voted for Option B (with open space) and 24 per cent voted for Option C (neither).
With majority community support for an open space concept, Council is now preparing to progress with the detail design phase of the project, with construction expected to commence in early 2023.
Mr Kourambas said Council will continue to engage with the community on the Macedon Square project.
“Council will continue to engage with traders during the detail design stage of the project in early 2022.
“This may include further investigation of other suggestions such as locations for new trolley bays, electric vehicle charging stations, car share spaces and smart waste bins,” says Mr Kourambas.

Eltham Gateway trees remain under threat

THE CLASH between utilitarian necessity, and community and environmental amenity is all too familiar to many residents of Warrandyte and surrounds.

The latest battleground is the Eltham Fitzsimons Lane Roundabout at the Eltham Gateway.

Major Road Projects Victoria (MRPV) is planning to remove the roundabout and replace it with a multilane, traffic-lighted intersection, as part of its $2.2 billion Northern Roads Upgrade project.

Planned works also include the removal of the roundabout at Porter Street in Templestowe and the redesign of the Foote Street intersection.

The work at the Eltham Gateway to replace the roundabout with an intersection will involve the removal of hundreds of trees which will significantly change the look of the area, threatening what many see as the visual gateway into Nillumbik’s Green Wedge, as well as damaging the character of the area and disrupting community amenity for residents.

Eltham Community Action Group (ECAG) has been campaigning for an alternative design which will help ease traffic flow without damaging the amenity and character of the area.

“People see those trees and it makes them feel like they have come home”, said Carlota Quinlan, a representative of ECAG.

Following what many see as an ineffective campaign by MRPV to share the proposed design in September 2018, the impact of the works — the extent of the removal of the trees — was not fully visualised to both commuters and the broader community until late 2019, when ECAG tied red ribbons to all the trees planned to be removed at the Eltham Gateway, as well as publishing mock-ups of the proposed design.

ECAG also submitted a petition with 3,000 signatures to the Minister for Transport Infrastructure, Jacinta Allan, requesting the project is halted and more a sympathetic design be sought, with more up to date traffic data.

In November 2019, the Diary ran a story on the ECAG red ribbon protest and asked MRPV if they were planning to alter the plans, given works are scheduled to begin in 2020.

At the time, MRPV told the Diary: “Updated preliminary designs will be published on the Major Road Projects Victoria website in the coming weeks.”

Nearly three months passed with no update, so the Diary contacted MRPV again for an update on the works, MRPV has now released information regarding alterations to the proposed 11 lane intersection.

Major Road Projects Victoria’s Delivery Director, Steve Cornish, told the Diary the design balanced important community feedback about the local significance of the Eltham Gateway with the needs of motorists, cyclists and pedestrians.

“We’ve listened to what’s important to the community and investigated a number of design options,” Mr Cornish said.

“The design changes we’ve made will reduce the number of trees that are impacted, while still ensuring we can deliver vital safety benefits and reduce congestion.”

The new design slightly reduces the footprint and, according to MRPV, reduces the number of trees being removed.

But details in their latest update are vague.

Following a meeting between the project team and ECAG on Wednesday, February 26, ECAG spoke to the Diary, and indicated they were still “very disappointed” with the planned works.

“They have not taken on board community concerns,” said Ms Quinlan.

Although the updated design reduces the number of trees that need to be removed, the trees which currently stand in the middle and around the roundabout are still going, which has been the whole point of ECAGs protest.

Ms Quinlan told the Diary ECAG includes members who have experience in urban design, engineering et cetera, and that the group has submitted alternative design ideas to MRPV, which meet the expectations of both MRPV and the local community, but these have been declined.

Ms Quinlan also reinforced the sentiment that ECAG is not against the road improvement project in principle.

She said the community action group simply want a design which maintains the character and amenity of the Eltham Gateway.

Whilst ECAG continue to negotiate with MRPV for a better deign, the project continues to grind through the necessary bureaucratic processes needed for works to begin with the necessary planning amendments gazetted on January 16.

Construction is still scheduled to begin later this year.

The Diary asked MRPV for specific details regarding the number of trees saved in the new design, as well as comment on how traffic flow will be impacted by the North East Link.

“Design refinements, since the initial reference design was released in September 2018, have resulted in a total of 150 fewer trees needing to be removed.

“This includes a most recent saving of 50 fewer trees needing to be removed with the design revisions released in February 2020.

“Major Road Projects Victoria’s traffic modelling showed that while traffic volumes on Fitzsimons Lane are expected to reduce with the opening of North East Link (2027), the existing roundabout would continue to create congestion, long queues and risky driver behaviour without an upgrade.

“Every iteration of the design has taken into account how future traffic volumes will affect the intersection.

“The updated design has reduced the overall footprint of the upgrade, while still delivering significant improvements to safety and congestion to Fitzsimons Lane.

“Major Road Projects Victoria will continue to inform and consult the community through web, electronic and mail updates, door knocks to nearby properties, community information sessions, and pop ups at events.”

The recent “artist’s impression” released by MRPV as part of the February update has also come under fire from ECAG on social media with a post on the groups Facebook page haranguing Major Roads for an artist’s impression which is misleading and not to scale.

There is still time for the community to voice their concerns or seek clarity on any aspect of the design.

MRPV is hosting a Drop In Session at Eltham Library on Wednesday, March 11, from 6pm.

 

Templestowe win the tussle

Templestowe won over Warrandyte in the annual STOP. One Punch Can Kill cup, with both Reserve and Senior outfits winning comprehensively.

STOP. One Punch Can Kill, an organization founded in 2013 by Caterina Politi after the tragic death of her son, David Cassai (a member of both the Warrandyte and Templestowe communities), is dedicated to teaching others the dangers of violence.

Both Warrandyte and Templestowe football clubs have been avid supporters of the cause, and changed the name of the Yarra Cup Challenge match to the STOP. One Punch Can Kill Cup in 2016 to further lend their hand to the organization.

Reserves

The Reserves struggled early in the game, kicking just the one major in the opening quarter.

Zac Ratcliffe continued his good form, constantly attacking the ball, but Warrandyte couldn’t manage to create clear-cut forward chances.

However, Warrandyte’s defence held firm, managing to restrict Templestowe well throughout the first half, and holding the margin to just 19 points at the major break.

Unfortunately, Josh Huntly sustained a broken arm in the second quarter, an injury that will see him spend a significant amount of time on the sideline.

The Bloods started the third term with great purpose, peppering the goals and generally running over Templestowe.

Sadly, Warrandyte would rue missed opportunities in front of goal to bring the game within reach, and despite only trailing by 16 points at three quarter time, fell by over eight goals at the final siren 3.7 25 to 12.5 77.

Seniors

The Senior side mirrored the Reserves early in the game, finishing the first quarter without recording a score while Templestowe piled on five goals.

In the second term Warrandyte managed to click into gear, with young star David Wilson kicking two terrific majors to ignite the Bloods.

Former Templestowe player Michael Cullum also managed to get one on the board as Warrandyte continued the charge, outscoring Templestowe for the quarter to trail by 29 points at the half.

Throughout the second half, emotion began to get the better of a few players out on the park, but both sides settled down to continue a decent second half of footy.

The Bloods, in particular Cullum, Troy Ratcliffe and Wilson, fought bravely throughout the third and fourth term, with Cullum adding another major.

Sadly, the Bloods were unable to make any real inroads on the margin, with Templestowe continuing to pick apart the defence to score when necessary.

When the final siren sounded, the Bloods trailed by 42 points, 7.10 52 to 14.10 94.

The Bloods face off against fierce rivals Ringwood in their next fixture – again at Warrandyte Reserve – and will look to secure a vital victory.

Despite a less than ideal result, the club can take away that STOP. One Punch Can Kill’s message about the dangers one punch can do was delivered.

Photo sourced from Warrandyte Football Club Facebook page

 

Police urge Warrandyte residents to step up home security in light of crime spike

MANNINGHAM crime prevention unit is urging residents of Warrandyte and surrounds to be vigilant with security of their homes and to invoke the basic Neighbourhood Watch Principles after another increase in crime in recent months.
Senior constable Carla Reardon told the Diary there had been a spike in burglaries in Warrandyte, Templestowe, Park Orchards and Donvale.

“By no means are we wanting to alarm people, but do need home security increased in the area to help deter burglars,” Sen Const Reardon said. “On many occasions people have security systems but  aren’t arming them or they are inactive for a variety of reasons including being broken or residents are only out for a short time.
“We are reminding residents to lock their houses including doors and windows, be aware of any suspicious behaviour, and people or vehicles that look as though they are out of place. Descriptions and details are very useful. It’s important to report any suspicious behaviour to 000 at the time of seeing these things so police have the opportunity to attend and make an assessment of it.
“Increase natural surveillance, for example, keeping gardens trimmed and having working sensor lights.
Get to know your neighbours and notify them if you will be away for a period of time, even just the weekend.”