Tag Archives: Susan Foreman

Fitzsimons Lane River Peel relocation

ONE OF THE City of Manningham’s most recognisable landmarks is about to move to a new home.
The River Peel sculpture will be relocated as part of the Fitzsimons Road Upgrade, being delivered by Major Road Projects Victoria.
The artwork is currently situated at the Fitzsimons Lane and Porter Street roundabout, which is being redeveloped to remove the roundabout and install traffic lights.
River Peel will be carefully dismantled and temporarily placed into storage before being reinstalled further along Fitzsimons Lane, close to the Yarra River crossing.
Manningham Mayor Cr Andrew Conlon described the River Peel as an “iconic local artwork signifying the unique river landscape and orcharding past of the local area of Doncaster and Templestowe”.
He said the relocation of River Peel from the roundabout to farther along Fitzsimons Lane will allow residents and visitors to continue to enjoy this sculptural piece in Manningham.
Work to remove the sculpture from its current home will begin on April 8, with the relocation expected to be completed by the middle of the year.
River Peel was created in 2001 by artists Michael Bellemo and Catriona Macleod.
It draws on the local heritage and surrounding landscape, imitating the Yarra River as it bends and turns through the area, and an apple peel to reflect the history of orchards in Doncaster and Templestowe.
MRPV has worked closely with Mr Bellemo and Ms Macleod, Manningham Council, Parks Victoria, Department of Transport, and Wurundjeri as the Registered Aboriginal Party to agree on the relocation site for River Peel.
The move will ensure the sculpture continues to be a gateway piece to Manningham on Fitzsimons Lane.
The Fitzsimons Lane Upgrade will redevelop four intersections along Fitzsimons Lane, which is a major thoroughfare connecting Melbourne’s northern suburbs with the city and eastern suburbs, and is used by more than 60,000 vehicles every day.
Major Road Projects Victoria Program Director Dipal Sorathia said the Fitzsimons Lane Upgrade has been designed to respond to the area’s growing transport needs, while also respecting the heritage of the local community.
“We’re proud we’ve been able to help find a new home for River Peel, which ensures it keeps its status as an important Manningham gateway piece for decades to come.”
He said, once completed, the road will be safer for all road users and provide drivers with faster, more reliable journeys.

Community objection

The project remains a focus of strong community protest.
The large-scale removal of trees at the Main Road and Fitzsimons Lane intersection — during the February lockdown — has not sat well with many residents, who felt the timing was a smack in the face for objectors.
Three residents local to the roundabout have become alarmed at MRPV’s interaction with local Councils and the community during the design stage and early works.
Vicki Shukuroglou and members of the Johnstone family convened a well-attended meeting at the Eltham bowls Club last week to report on meetings with MRPV and to plan further protest action.
Local engineers told the meeting they had presented calculations and plans supporting their contention that the 25 per cent reductions in traffic volume (14,000 vehicles per day) resulting from the North East Link have not been factored into the 6-8 lane design, only to be told the MPV design supports the business case for the Project.
Other speakers highlighted gaps in the environmental approvals and processes.
Ms Shukuroglou called for this meeting be the beginning of a call to “Pause this Project”.
A full report of the meeting will be published in the April WD Bulletin.
MRPV said in a statement, the project is the first in a multi-billion-dollar pipeline of road upgrades in Melbourne’s north as part of Victoria’s “Big Build”.
The statement said the project is generating much-needed jobs as part of the State Government’s COVID-19 response.
MRPV remains committed to delivering the Fitzsimons Lane Upgrade by the end of 2025.

New dog on-lead area around Warrandyte Lions Park

MANNINGHAM COUNCIL has made changes to dog controls in the Warrandyte River Reserve to ensure dogs remain on lead near the Warrandyte Bridge including the recently upgraded Lions Park area.
The change has been introduced to support safety for residents and visitors to this area and those enjoying the newly upgraded community facilities within the reserve.
Dogs must be on lead within the newly designated on lead area, which is a 260-metre section of the Warrandyte River Reserve, between 183 Yarra Street and the Warrandyte Bridge.
The new on lead area is in accordance with Council’s resolution in September 2020, which introduced Order Number 4 Dog and Cat Controls across Manningham.
This order was introduced in line with the Domestic Animals Act 1994.
There are still sections within the Warrandyte River Reserve that are designated as off lead areas.
In Manningham, dogs are only permitted off lead in designated areas providing the dog is kept under control at all times.
Dogs must be on lead within 15 metres of:
• public barbecue facilities
• children’s play equipment
• organised sporting events
• approved community functions or public outdoor meetings.
There can be penalties for owners who let their dog off their lead in areas where it is not permitted.
It is important to note that dogs are not permitted within the Federation Playspace area of this reserve.
For more information, on dog controls including on and off lead areas, visit manningham.vic.gov.au /changes-to-dog-on-lead-areas
or call 9840 9333.

Information Warrandyte shuts up shop

INFORMATION WARRANDYTE closed its doors during the COVID lockdown, and now operator Doncare has decided not to continue operating from the Warrandyte Community Centre site.
Originally the Warrandyte Citizens Advice Bureau, the service commenced operations in 1986 in the Old Post Office and, since November 1991, has been situated at the Warrandyte Community Centre, operating as Information Warrandyte Inc.
In 2017, Information Warrandyte, in partnership with Doncare, commenced delivery of Emergency Relief services following discussions about the provision of local services in the Warrandyte area.
After suffering some significant hurdles in 2019, Information Warrandyte sought the support of Doncare to continue operating.
Doncare provided the following statement:

“Following lengthy discussions with Manningham Council, in March 2020 the Committee of Management agreed to wind-up Information Warrandyte’s Incorporated Association due to the lack of recurring funding.
At that time, with the support of the outgoing committee and subsequent funding from Manningham City Council, Doncare committed to not only continue the services offered from this site, but to expand and build a strong and robust connection to the Warrandyte community.
Of course, no-one could have predicted the COVID-19 pandemic and its profound impact on the Australian economy and society.
Like many other Community Service Organisations, Doncare faced a wide range of sustainability-related implications as the impacts of COVID emerged.
The financial implications on our fundraising due to the temporary closure of the op shops and cessation of fund-raising events and initiatives has been detrimental to our income streams.
While the Op Shops have since reopened, due to a reduction in volunteers and the current economic crisis, the recovery to Doncare’s income has not eventuated, thus, to remain afloat Doncare has implemented cost-saving measures, including reducing its paid workforce from the top down.
Sadly, the stretch on Doncare’s resources has meant that we are not able to adequately resource a second site.
Therefore, with a very heavy heart, Doncare will not be operating from the Warrandyte Community Centre.
Doncare strives to provide innovative, high quality, person-centred services and we pride ourselves on developing initiatives that place the organisation in a robust position to respond to community demand in Warrandyte.
While our plans to deliver services from the Warrandyte Community Centre have been hampered by COVID-19, we continue to provide services to members of the Warrandyte community from MC2 in Doncaster.
Whether we are supporting socially isolated seniors with volunteer supported recreational activities, or paying their winter bills, helping disadvantaged kids get to school or to camp, providing counselling to teens or families, helping women and children escape family violence, or simply being a source of community connection, Doncare’s presence in Manningham, and particularly Warrandyte continues.”

Information Warrandyte has a long and proud history, and some volunteers had provided their valuable service for decades.
One volunteer, Joyce Wilks provided this reflection on the legacy of Information Warrandyte:
“It was run by a voluntary Committee of Management and at their peak they had as many as 38 volunteers.
Most Information Warrandyte volunteers completed a 50-hour accredited training course, and a few volunteers were also accredited to offer Tax Help for eligible low-income clients.
Many volunteers were very loyal, and even after moving away from Warrandyte they continued to come in weekly to do their shift.
Three volunteers put in over 30 years of service.
However modern technology and smart phones took a toll on Information Warrandyte with less visitors and clients needing their services, so the decision was made to disband after serving the Warrandyte community for 34 years.
A final get together was delayed by the COVID-19 pandemic until March 2021 when many of the volunteers enjoyed catching up with each other at Petty’s Orchard for morning tea.”

New hope

The good news is that all is not lost.
Manningham Council is actively working to re-establish a service for the Warrandyte Community.
Manningham Yarra Ward councillor, Carli Lange told the Diary:
“Many community groups would love to utilise the space and to work together for the benefit of the community.
“Manningham Council will conduct an expression of interest and looks to have a vital support facility for its community”.
Support services continue to be available from Doncare at their Doncaster facility at 687 Doncaster Road.
The Diary will keep across the issue and will provide updates on the reinstatement of welfare services for our community.

Encouraging women to run for government

GOVERNANCE in many municipalities has long been dominated by male voices.

So, there is a drive by the Victorian State Government to inspire a new generation of women councillors ahead of the October local government elections.

Minister for Local Government Shaun Leane, announced the It’s Our Time campaign, which aims to inspire women to get involved in local government and nominate for election.

The push will include the provision of online resources including webinars.

Mr Leane said, “Gender equality makes communities, councils and Victoria stronger.

“That’s why we’re making support available to encourage women to run for council and support safe campaigning.”

It’s Our Time will draw on the experience and expertise of a range of partners including LGPro (Local Government Professionals), the Australian Local Government Women’s Association, the Victorian Local Governance Association, the YWCA and the Ethnic Communities Council.

Minister for Women, Gabrielle Williams, said Victoria is leading the country when it comes to improving gender equality.

“We want people of all genders to enjoy equal rights, opportunities, responsibilities and outcomes — and programs like this help us make it happen,” she said.

A century on from the election of the state’s first woman councillor, Mary Rogers, Victoria now boasts the highest number of female mayors in history with 32 in place across the state.

However, 13 of Victoria’s 79 councils have just one female councillor while overall, women account for just 38 per cent of elected representatives.

Locally, Manningham Council currently has a majority of women on council, with five out of the nine councillors identifying as female, while only two of the seven members of Nillumbik’s council are women.

Manningham

Andrew Day, Manningham CEO told the Diary, with four female Mayors over the past eight years, Manningham Council has a proud history of electing women into leadership roles.

“Manningham Council is committed to supporting and celebrating gender equality and diversity within our community and among the Councillors who are elected to represent our community,” he said.

Mr Day said during the current four-year Council term, the Manningham community elected five female Councillors and four male Councillors.

“During this time, the Councillors have elected two female Mayors and two female Deputy Mayors, which highlights the opportunities for local women in leadership roles at Manningham Council.

Mr Day said having an elected Council that adequately represents the local community with a good gender mix is important to Council decision making.

“This encourages a diversity of views and opinions to effectively lead and represent constituents, make strategic decisions and support good local governance for the wider community,” Mr Day said.

He said Manningham Council has a range of support options in place to help remove some of the traditional barriers for women standing for Council, including carer support options, payment of allowances and expenses for Councillor duties, and a flexible approach to meeting times to accommodate other personal or family commitments.

“As Manningham moves to a new nine ward structure, we encourage women and people of all ages and backgrounds who are interested in representing their local community to stand for Council at the upcoming October election,” Mr Day said.

Nillumbik

Nillumbik Mayor, Karen Egan said Nillumbik Shire Council has strong commitment to gender equality through its Gender Equity Policy Statement, which was adopted in 2018.

“For local government to be a true reflection of the communities we serve it is important to have representation of both men and women, as well as people from a range of diverse experiences.

“Not only do women make up just over 50 per cent of the population, but men and women have very different ways of looking at things — together, we represent a wide range of views and offer different perspectives on the important issues Council needs to consider for our community.

“I’m proud to be the first Mayor from the rural ward of Bunjil,” she said.

Ms Egan said standing for Council can be tough, particularly in rural areas.

“You have to have a thick skin to withstand the personal attacks and opposition, and financially, campaigning can be costly.

“The time commitment required of councillors, including the time away from home, can be difficult for women already juggling the demands of family and work, particularly single mothers like myself,” she said.

This year, with COVID-19, women are bearing even more of the financial burden and caring responsibilities, making it more difficult.

“But being a councillor is an extremely rewarding opportunity to serve the local community.

“I urge more women to consider using their unique skills and knowledge to help make a real difference to their local areas,” she said.

Parthway to diversity

The Victorian Government has provided $137,000 to promote pathways for a more diverse range of candidates standing for local government in 2020.

This has included backing the Victorian Local Governance Association’s Your Community, Country and Council campaign to Aboriginal communities.

Minister Leane has also announced the launch of a new Gender Equality Advisory Panel which will focus on achieving the 50 per cent representation target set by Victoria’s gender equality strategy Safe and Strong and delivering the reforms of the state’s new Gender Equality Act 2020.

The panel will include members from across the sector including LGPro and councillor representatives.

Mr Leane said the new Gender Equality Advisory Panel will be “full of experience and know-how”.

“It’s an important step towards achieving gender equity in councils by 2025 and one that will inspire a new generation of councillors,” he said.

The Local Government Act 2020 also promotes gender diversity with stronger action on sexual harassment and rules for councils to measure gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness in their workforce plans.

The nomination period for the 2020 Municipal Elections is from September 17–22.

Anyone wishing to nominate for Council should visit their local council or VEC website:

Manningham

manningham.vic.gov.au/candidate-information

Nillumbik

nillumbik.vic.gov.au/Council/About-Council/Council-elections/

Victorian Electoral Commission

www.vec.vic.gov.au

 

Enrol to vote now to exercise your entitlement

By SUSAN FOREMAN

TIME IS running out to ensure you have your say at the upcoming municipal elections.

Election day is October 24 and the close of roll is 57 days prior.

The vote will be conducted as a postal election, with ballot packs being mailed to every enrolled voter in early October.

To vote in the council elections you must be enrolled by 4pm on Friday, August 28, 2020.

There are two categories of enrolment, either the State roll or the Council roll, called the “CEO’s list”.

The State Roll requires voters to be over 18 and an Australian citizen, the CEOs List is provided to give non-citizen ratepayers an entitlement to vote.

State enrolment

If you live in an electorate and are enrolled to vote in State elections at your current address, you are automatically enrolled to vote in that Council’s elections.

If you are an Australian citizen aged 18 years or over and you have lived in Victoria for at least one month, you will need to enrol with the Victorian Electoral Commission if you are not on the State electoral roll.

You can apply, check and amend your state enrolment details online at vec.vic.gov.au.

Voting is compulsory for State-enrolled electors at Council elections.

Council enrolment

If you were on the last voters’ roll for your current municipality at the 2016 Council elections as a non-resident owner (and the circumstances of your enrolment have not changed), you may be automatically enrolled by council to vote at this year’s election.

You can apply to appear on the CEO’s List if you are aged 18 years or over, pay rates for a property within that municipality and are not otherwise entitled to vote in that municipality.

You have an automatic entitlement as a council-enrolled voter if you:

  • Own a property within a council but do not live in the area,
  • pay rates for a residence or a corporation in a council area.

You can apply to enrol if you:

  • Are not an Australian citizen, but you live and pay rates in a council, or
  • pay rates on a property you occupy and have no other entitlement to vote in the council, or
  • are a director or company secretary of a corporation that pays rates and have no other entitlement to vote in the council, or
  • are a ratepayer, you were not on the council roll at the 2016 council election and you are not on the State roll for that council area.

Check with your local council to apply, check and amend your council enrolment details.

For local council elections in October 2020, it is not compulsory for council-enrolled voters to vote, except in Melbourne City Council.

The introduction of the Local Government Act 2020 will make it compulsory for all types of voters, including council-enrolled voters, to vote in all municipal elections scheduled from October 2024.

Helping our most vulnerable and marginalised

Doncare is particularly concerned about the vulnerable members in our community and people who are now being impacted financially, socially and emotionally by situations arising from COVID–19.

Many of whom, may not have required assistance before.

Last financial year, 98 per cent of clients seeking assistance from Doncare’s Information and Emergency Relief program were in receipt of a government pension, with 30 per cent receiving a Newstart Allowance.

That figure is set to rise, as Covid-19 continues to affect the level of unemployment.

Every day, Doncare’s Community Support Workers hear stories of family violence, financial hardship, homelessness or people facing the real risk of becoming homeless through the inability to pay rent or mortgages.

They see parents who cannot feed their children, pensioners who have not put on heating or who have had to choose between paying their utility bills and eating.

Many seniors tell us that they would normally spend time in local libraries or shopping centres to keep warm, but with Stage 3 restrictions in place, they are housebound.

Now that Victorian children are learning remotely, financially vulnerable families will also see significant increases in utility usage and expenditure as the winter months approach.

On average, Doncare feeds over 3,000 individuals a year and has already experienced a 200 per cent increase since February in the numbers of people approaching its Emergency Relief program for essential food items.

At the same time however, as suppliers and major donors take their own precautionary measures and downsize operations, Doncare is rapidly running out of food to distribute.

A Doncare spokesperson told the Diary thst now, more than ever, Doncare needs the community’s help to maintain the health and wellbeing of people experiencing hardship by donating food and household items.

“We have been very fortunate that Bendigo Bank’s Warrandyte and Doncaster East and Templestowe Village branches donated funds and Noel Jones Doncaster jumped to the rescue with a significant donation, even securing a huge amount of food from Metropolitan Foods Pty Ltd with the funds they donated.”

Year 9 students, Lucas and Angus also popped in to the Doncare office with Toby, Vice Captain of Whitefriars College.

The students initiated a fundraising BBQ and partnered with Youth Resource Officers from Warrandyte and Forest Hill Police Departments.

They raised $413.40 for Doncare’s food pantry.

Thanks to Mary-Anne Lowe, Warrandyte locals can now donate non-perishable items to Doncare’s food pantry by visiting the drive-thru drop zone at Bramleigh Estate, Warrandyte.

Donations will be gratefully accepted seven days a week from 7am–7pm (contactless).

Doncare’s new CEO Gaby Thomson said: “We are extremely grateful to Mary-Anne for creating this fabulous initiative, and to all the families, businesses and community groups that have already donated.

“This level of support really and truly echoes the sentiments of Doncare’s philosophy ‘for the community, by the community’,” she said.

Donations can also be delivered to Doncare’s main office at Suite 4, Level 1, 687 Doncaster Road, Doncaster.

Whilst the MC2 building is closed due to Covid-19, staff will gladly meet you downstairs to collect donations.

Meanwhile, Doncare has adopted physical distancing and other transmission reduction measures across the organisation and will be providing remote service delivery to clients in Family Services; Counselling; the Social Support for Seniors program and Community Visitors Scheme.

DAWN mentors will also continue to support women in recovery from family violence.

Should you require emergency relief or assistance with food parcels and food vouchers, please call Doncare on 9856 1500.

For more information, visit
www.doncare.org.au

 

The bank that cares for its community in a crisis

By SUSAN FOREMAN

YOUR LOCAL community bank has long been the lifeblood for the community, and especially in our current State of Emergency, the bank is doing all it can to help.

Community Liaison Officer at the Warrandyte Community Bank, Dee Dickson said the branch is staying in touch with Bendigo Bank head office, their staff, customers and community partners to ensure they are able to continue to service and support customers safely.

“Behind the scenes we have been speaking with our not-for-profit partners to understand the needs of locals, how this presents now and how it is likely to present moving forward.

“Recently we have contributed $2,000 to Now and Not Yet for the provision of emergency food parcels for local people and families in need.

“We have also reached out to Doncare and provided $1000 toward the distribution of food parcels and donated $2,000 to the Rotary Op Shop Food Bank to ensure they are well stocked with non-perishables.

“We’re exploring other ways to fund projects that support those in need and lift spirits — demonstrating what we can achieve together.”

If you know of someone, including your own family, that is in need, there is help available:

  • Now and Not Yet:  148–150 Yarra
    St, Warrandyte — for food and
    support.
  • Rotary Op Shop:  Rear of the
    Bridge shops, 264 Yarra St,
    Warrandyte  — for food (non-
    perishables on  site)  and food
    orders (purchased  and  delivered
    by op shop  volunteers)
  • Doncare:  Manningham City
    Square, Suite 4 level 1/687
    Doncaster Rd, Doncaster
    — for food  and crisis intervention
  • Pettet Family Foundation, Park
    Orchards — Crisis intervention
    and inclusion services for children
    and their families.
    Contact Geoff Parkes
    geoff.parkes@bigpond.com
    or 0418 392 748.

For 17 years, the Warrandyte Community Bank Branch has been committed to the care of locals and the groups of which they are members, especially when things get tough.

“As we respond to COVID-19, please know our commitment to our customers, will not change.

“If you need assistance our branch staff are here to help you navigate these uncertain financial times,” Dee said.

The branch is open Monday–Friday from 9:30am–5pm or staff can be contacted on 9844 2233.