Tag Archives: Parks Victoria

Fitzsimons Lane River Peel relocation

ONE OF THE City of Manningham’s most recognisable landmarks is about to move to a new home.
The River Peel sculpture will be relocated as part of the Fitzsimons Road Upgrade, being delivered by Major Road Projects Victoria.
The artwork is currently situated at the Fitzsimons Lane and Porter Street roundabout, which is being redeveloped to remove the roundabout and install traffic lights.
River Peel will be carefully dismantled and temporarily placed into storage before being reinstalled further along Fitzsimons Lane, close to the Yarra River crossing.
Manningham Mayor Cr Andrew Conlon described the River Peel as an “iconic local artwork signifying the unique river landscape and orcharding past of the local area of Doncaster and Templestowe”.
He said the relocation of River Peel from the roundabout to farther along Fitzsimons Lane will allow residents and visitors to continue to enjoy this sculptural piece in Manningham.
Work to remove the sculpture from its current home will begin on April 8, with the relocation expected to be completed by the middle of the year.
River Peel was created in 2001 by artists Michael Bellemo and Catriona Macleod.
It draws on the local heritage and surrounding landscape, imitating the Yarra River as it bends and turns through the area, and an apple peel to reflect the history of orchards in Doncaster and Templestowe.
MRPV has worked closely with Mr Bellemo and Ms Macleod, Manningham Council, Parks Victoria, Department of Transport, and Wurundjeri as the Registered Aboriginal Party to agree on the relocation site for River Peel.
The move will ensure the sculpture continues to be a gateway piece to Manningham on Fitzsimons Lane.
The Fitzsimons Lane Upgrade will redevelop four intersections along Fitzsimons Lane, which is a major thoroughfare connecting Melbourne’s northern suburbs with the city and eastern suburbs, and is used by more than 60,000 vehicles every day.
Major Road Projects Victoria Program Director Dipal Sorathia said the Fitzsimons Lane Upgrade has been designed to respond to the area’s growing transport needs, while also respecting the heritage of the local community.
“We’re proud we’ve been able to help find a new home for River Peel, which ensures it keeps its status as an important Manningham gateway piece for decades to come.”
He said, once completed, the road will be safer for all road users and provide drivers with faster, more reliable journeys.

Community objection

The project remains a focus of strong community protest.
The large-scale removal of trees at the Main Road and Fitzsimons Lane intersection — during the February lockdown — has not sat well with many residents, who felt the timing was a smack in the face for objectors.
Three residents local to the roundabout have become alarmed at MRPV’s interaction with local Councils and the community during the design stage and early works.
Vicki Shukuroglou and members of the Johnstone family convened a well-attended meeting at the Eltham bowls Club last week to report on meetings with MRPV and to plan further protest action.
Local engineers told the meeting they had presented calculations and plans supporting their contention that the 25 per cent reductions in traffic volume (14,000 vehicles per day) resulting from the North East Link have not been factored into the 6-8 lane design, only to be told the MPV design supports the business case for the Project.
Other speakers highlighted gaps in the environmental approvals and processes.
Ms Shukuroglou called for this meeting be the beginning of a call to “Pause this Project”.
A full report of the meeting will be published in the April WD Bulletin.
MRPV said in a statement, the project is the first in a multi-billion-dollar pipeline of road upgrades in Melbourne’s north as part of Victoria’s “Big Build”.
The statement said the project is generating much-needed jobs as part of the State Government’s COVID-19 response.
MRPV remains committed to delivering the Fitzsimons Lane Upgrade by the end of 2025.

Parks closures

The Warrandyte Diary has been informed that Warrandyte State Park visitor sites have been closed due to danger from high winds.

According to an email from Parks Victoria sent to registered Volunteer Groups and Tour Operators,  Jumping Creek Reserve, Normans Reserve, Koornong Reserve and Pound Bend are currently closed to the public, and are scheduled to reopen on Thursday, September 3.

There are damaging winds warning in effect across South East Victoria and as many will have seen, during daily activity following the storm o Thursday, and from notifications on the Vic Emergency app today, trees are coming down.

Stay safe out there today!

Community fun run back for another lap

From left: Michelle Bean (Run Warrandyte), Tracy Channon (Netball President), Phil Treeby (Run Warrandyte), Bill Stubbs (Cricket President) Jason Smith (Senior Footy President). Absent: Travis Reddaway (Junior Footy President) and David Dyason (Run Warrandyte).

THE PREMIER running event in every Warrandyte runner’s heart, Run Warrandyte, is back for another lap (or three).

The ninth iteration of the annual event, will be held on Sunday, March 1 and has nominated Guide Dogs Victoria as its official charity partner, allowing participants the opportunity to fundraise to help the charity raise the money needed to breed and train a four-legged companion for those who are vision impaired.

It costs approximately $50,000 to breed and train just one guide dog.

The run is also a great opportunity to raise money for the Warrandyte Sporting Group with a combination of runner fundraising and profits from the run going towards important projects at the Warrandyte Sports Club.

Run Warrandyte Committee member, Michelle Bean, spoke to the Diary about the run and how it has contributed to the Sporting Group over the past eight years.

“To date we have raised a total of $53,000.

“These funds have been put towards past projects such as the new electronic scoreboard.

“Future projects include court and field lighting upgrades, as well as assisting in the enhancement of player training and wellbeing,” she said.

Run Warrandyte 2020 is also doing its part for the environment — the run is making steps to becoming a zero waste event.

Before the event, the committee is encouraging participants to not print their registration confirmations when they come to collect their bibs, instead showing a copy of the confirmation on your smartphone will suffice.

On the day, water on course will be provided in biodegradable cups and packaging, and participants and their families are encouraged to bring their own water bottles or collapsible cups for use during the event, these items are also available to purchase through the event registration website.

The event distances of 2.2, 5, 10 and 15 kilometres will follow the same course as the previous two years, offering 5–15km runners the opportunity to run through picturesque bushland in The Pound.

With assistance of the Day family, these runners will get an opportunity to run a unique course not normally accessible to the public.

“Numbers for the event continue to grow and the committee receive great joy in playing a part in providing a fun day for the community.

“The committee is ever grateful to the major sponsors that help make the event happen including, Warrandyte Community Bank, The Grand Hotel, Goldfields Family Medical Centre, Charlie Bins, Harding Swift Caravan Services, Ringwood Warrandyte Osteo, Quinton’s IGA, Johnstone Reimer Lawyers and Project Clothing,” said Michelle.

With distances catering for all ages and ability levels, Run Warrandyte is the ideal community event to get active and experience the wonderful Warrandyte bushland that surrounds our town.

Warrandyte runs around the Pound

THE FIRST WEEKEND in March was once again a busy one as over 600 people flocked to Warrandyte Reserve for the eighth iteration of the community running event to either run or volunteer.

A little rain overnight kept the morning temperatures down which was a welcome relief to most who would have been training in the weeks leading up to the run where average temperatures were around the high 20s–low 30s.

This year, the run organisers managed to negotiate a tweak to the existing courses which made the run both easier to manage and a more challenging run.

For the 2.2K runners, this meant they only had to run one lap, instead of two as in previous years but saw them climbing all the way up Everard Drive and Pound Road, alongside the 5, 10 and 15K runners.

For the longer distances the course still looped through the Pound but thanks to the cooperation of Parks Victoria and property owner Jan Day, runners passed through her property after exiting the Tank Track and joined the bushland trail which follows the river between the Ranger Station and the Tunnel carpark.

Despite what was viewed by the run committee as a more trail-like and technically challenging course, and the fact that each lap of the longer runs were around 150 metres longer than five kilometres, the feedback on the finish line and around the event village was extremely positive.

David Dyason, chair of the Run Warrandyte committee spoke to the Diary about the success of the event.

“This year’s course was highly acclaimed by all participants, we have received many compliments and no negative feedback… one participant made us promise not to change the course next year ‘it was so good…’ which we have had to do for various reasons in the past,” he said.

Warrandytian Brynton Ashton placed in the top three of the 15K distance since it was introduced in 2016.

Brynton once again dominated the longer distance finishing 1:25 ahead of 2nd place Alex Tracey and despite the tougher course, only 29 seconds slower than the previous year.

After the race, Brynton spoke with guest commentator and Member for Warrandyte, Ryan Smith.

When asked how he was feeling Brynton said his legs were “a bit sore given the new course” but that it was overall an enjoyable run.

The buzz around the event village after the run was great with numerous medal ceremonies taking place, Run Warrandyte also had a number of runners running for charitable causes, both local and afar.

The event’s official fund raising page gave participants the opportunity to raise money for organisations including the Warrandyte Netball Club, Warrandyte Football Club, Warrandyte Junior Football Club, Warrandyte Cricket Club, Warrandyte CFA, STOP One Punch Can Kill, and Rivers Gift(SIDS).

Through the event, runners managed to raise over $2700, cementing Run Warrandyte as a great platform to inspire people to raise money for a good cause.

Mr Dyason went on to talk about the unique opportunity a fun run in Warrandyte presents and praised Parks Victoria for their assistance in making the course run a possibility.

“We think that, for a fun run, our course is truly unique.

“The mix of urban streets, fire trails and State Park single trails, with much of it having Yarra River views we think it’s an awesome treat.

“Parks Victoria are to be commended for working with us and allowing us to use these trails and we feel the responsibility of ensuring this section of Warrandyte bushland is respected and appreciated by our participants — and we think it was.”

If you ran on the day, make sure you visit the event page on GeoSnapShot for official race photographs.

Run Warrandyte will be back in 2019.

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Medals were awarded for 1st, 2nd and 3rd in an Under 8, 12-17 and Open categories for most distances, medal winning runners and their official times are listed below.

Spelling of names and official times sourced from Tomato Timing.

15K

Open Male: Brynton Ashton (1:02:50), Alex Tracey (1:04:15), Marcus Boxall (1:06:36)

Open Female: Narelle Cormack (1:08:41), Melissa Hansford (1:11:16), Eloise Thompson (1:13:53)

12–17 Male: Brown Vermeulen (1:18:10), Nicholas Alexander (1:23:22), Brown Vermeulen (1:27:56)

12–17 Female: Alicia Callahan (1:18:46)

10K

Open Male: Aron Class (41:12), Ben McKinnon (44:13), Robert Clark (48:01)

Open Female: Naomi Peters (52:15), Clare Oliveira (52:18), Atsuko Sasaki (52:48)

12–17 Male: Benjamin Reid (43:04), Max Savill-Bentley (43:36), Lucas Todd (1:09:26)

8–11 Male: Cambell Stark (54:33)

5K

Open Male: Nicholas Brooke-Anderson (20:04), Hudson Rostrom (21:42), Michael Cullum (21.49)

Open Female: Sherry Street (22.40), Veronica Bence (24.56), Nicole Lavender (25:35)

12–17 Male: Ben Munks (22:28), Adam Gillard (23:10), Jed Harrowell (23:19)

12–17 Female: Ruby Maher (22:30), Chloe Woollard (24:55), Julia Rooney-Watson (27:43)

8–11 Male: Lenny Reddaway (25:55), Wes Callow (26:36), Michell Harrison (27:23)

8–11 Female: Anni Tatten (27:19), Rose Rostron (29:21), Millie Hurley (30:03)

U8 Male: Hamish Dwyer (28:10), Archie Andrew (28:39), Ethan Sampimon (30:08)

U8 Female: Sophia Marelas (43:51), Jade Trewarn (1:14:29)

2.2K

Open Male: Luke Brewis (8:18), Charles Johnstone (8:55), Martin Baldock (10:32)

Open Female: Alice Van Rijn (11:44), Yvette Harbinson (12:01), Lynda Madams (13:03)

12–17 Male: Samuel Ferguson (9:34), Odin Harbinson (10:05), Dylan Thompson (11:00)

12–17 Female: Amber Louw (8:21), Cassie May (10:50), Stella Thompson (26:17)

8–11 Male: Jacob Close (9:30), Elliot Butcher (9:37), Reve Pearce (10:26)

8–11 Female: Eva Graham (11:26), Jasmine Knowles (11:41), Zara Veal (12:38)

U8 Male: Taylor Aldenhoven (11:24), Hunter Veal (11:38), Marlon Damcher (11:44)

U8 Female: Chole Baldock (10:31), Millah Townshend (14:05), Greta Fitzgibbon (15:07)

U8s Kids Run

Open: Sophie Linden (18.54), Xavier Forsyth (19.38), Austin Stainer (19.59)