News

Festival of favourites


THE much-anticipated Warrandyte Festival has come and gone for another year. The sun shone, the arts were embraced and our royal monarchs Cherry and Joff Manders rode a pair of curious camels down Yarra Street. It doesn’t get much better than that!

Warrandytians gathered in their thousands to enjoy the weekend that trumps most out east. The atmosphere was buzzing and it was smiles all round as the spirit of the festival took hold.

The festivities began with Battle of the Bands on the Friday evening. All bands were talented – their stage presence was electric and the extent to which they banged their heads was admirable. AMIKO were lucky enough to take out the title this year, scoring a two-day recording contract in a professional studio.

The iconic parade down Yarra Street was a treat for everyone as always. Special guests including Cr Paul McLeish, the mayor of Manningham, and Cr Ken King, representing the mayor of Nillumbik, enjoyed prime viewing from the community centre balcony. Warrandyte’s veteran MP, Ryan Smith, was there to catch all the action too.

Our King and Queen were dressed to impress in their regal attire, yet still somehow managing to climb atop their chosen camels. Fortunately, their royal steeds were not spooked by the fire trucks or bagpipes and our monarchs rode forth safely … despite our Queen’s “Kingsley” looking a little frazzled in the early stages.

Of course, all of Warrandyte’s favourite community groups and services, sporting clubs and schools also took part in the parade with gusto. Well-known businesses Warrandyte Community Bank and Quinton’s IGA were in full festival spirit, as well as the Warrandyte Theatre Group standing out in their vibrant costumes.

The 2015 theme Smart Arts became increasingly apparent as many little artists from Warrandyte Primary and Anderson’s Creek emerged. Equipped with their berets, palettes or own artistic creations, these kids were clearly ready for the big weekend ahead.

It’s hard not to appreciate the cuteness of the local tots of Warrandyte’s kindergartens and preschools. Crowded into the back of their trucks turned floats, nothing was going to stop them from waving enthusiastically to their families.

Warrandyte Neighbourhood House also embraced this year’s theme through the acknowledgment and celebration of Deborah Halpern’s newly installed sculpture. Calling themselves the Community Queen’s of Shire, the ladies walked forward with much grace and style.

Once again, Peter Norman drove his blue 1954 Fordson Major. Peter and his tractor represent the Diary year after year and always do us proud.

As the parade concluded, it was time for everyone to head down to Stiggants Reserve to engage in more festival fun. The trickiest part was trying to figure out where to go and what to do first!

Given the theme, art was certainly abundant within the festival grounds. The unmissable ‘Fat Ladies’ and their companions the ‘Skinny Men’ were back once more, continuing to draw many admirers.

For curious young minds, ‘Smart Arts Central’ was undoubtedly the place to be. The workshop space was transformed from a circus show to a ukulele studio, to a drama theatre and more. The amount of audience participation and level of enthusiasm within the crowd was infectious.

There was no shortage of artsy activities and events within the reserve. Many stalls presented opportunities for the kids to make or engage with something creative, such as paint a communal blank canvas while waiting for your turn to ride a camel, or colour a plaster model to keep as a souvenir.

Keen young readers’ needs were met as a beautiful tree adjacent the main stage had picture books and colourful pom poms hanging from the branches. It looked majestic and the novelty of it made it very inviting. Somehow, reading a book hanging from a tree becomes so much more satisfying than reading one ordinarily.

Other community stalls also embraced the festival’s smart arts theme. The Warrandyte Uniting Church offered simple but effective plate decorating fun, while the Yarra Warra Kinder gave the option to do some cool bush-style threading.

A unique jewellery store ‘Name on a grain’ also sparked interest and suited the festival theme. With precision, the stall managers would write a name or word on a tiny grain of rice and encapsulate it within a small transparent pendant. The dainty result made for a wonderful gift.

For that matter, gift opportunities were everywhere: from soaps that look good enough to eat to home made terrariums and potted cacti.

While the kids were easily entertained, adults at the festival were also well catered for with food, drink and entertainment. It also offers a chance to catch up with fellow Warrandytians and others.

Festival-goers were once again spoilt for choice when it came to food. The event embraced multiculturalism as reflected in the available food options. Take your pick from Polish dumplings, Italian-style woodfire pizza, French crepes, Dutch poffertjes, authentic Indian curry, or maybe the classic Slovenian kransky in bread from the Warrandyte RSL.

Twistos, Korean-style twisted potatoes (those intriguing fried twists on a stick), were another popular option, and one of those novelties you almost feel obliged to eat in the spirit of the festival – similar in that way to the CFA’s famous hot jam donuts!

Once you made your all-important food choice, the time came to pick a stage and performer to listen and/or boogie to. The music scene was outstanding this year with a lot of talent across both stages and days.

The riverbank stage featured a diverse range of performers, from the lovable one-man-band Uptown Brown to cool indie rock band Pinball Machine. Great sound and enthusiasm all round.

The main stage of course gave all the local schools a chance to shine, but it was later in the evening when the party really started.

Melbourne-based band Jakubi got everyone up and dancing with their unique mix of hip-hop, reggae, soul and synthesised rhythms. Their energy was contagious and created a positive vibe.

After their performance, the band posted on their Facebook page (which has close to 20,000 likes) that there was ‘somethin’ crazy in the air last night [at the] Warrandyte Festival.’ Along with a video of Stiggants Reserve going wild, the guys also wrote: ‘Thank you so much to everyone that came out and destroyed that poor grass with us. So much love!!!’ Cue all the young girls’ hearts to skip a beat!

A new acoustic tent also found its place at the festival this year. The performers Dan, Tom and Ruby sung stripped back covers of songs as well as original material. Their music was a delight.

Warrandyte High School’s dog show and pet parade was a hit as always with no shortage of cute pups under the big red top. Much to the amusement of the audience, many pets got distracted when attempting to perform their best trick. But Claire Bloom was always sure to console owners and pets with an encouraging “good try”.

Simultaneously, the tension was building over at the annual billy cart derby. This year saw various well-designed vehicles, including a new type of cart, the reverse three-wheeler. As competitors were narrowed down, the onlooking crowd continued their enthusiastic support – in particular, the always-loud ‘CherryBomb’ cheer squad, who made sure everyone knew who they were rooting for.

While there were a few close calls, everything ran smoothly and there were no major collisions. St John’s Ambulance Service, in conjunction with the trusty mulch pile, stood by regardless to ensure the safety of all drivers.

If you have an interest in our town’s past, hopefully you were able to make it to John Hanson’s historical gold mine tour. John’s vast knowledge about our town’s founding gold miners was fascinating as always, and after a number years the tour remains popular among Warrandytians and visitors alike.

When it comes to wacky Warrandyte traditions, the iconic annual duck race is right up there. The tension was building on the riverbank as onlookers counted down from 10 to the release of the decorated ducks. Three, two, one… and the race was on! Tension subsides as the ducks float slowly downstream. Duck owners follow their progression from the riverbank, hoping their ducks took out the title.

Other market and community service stalls also made their annual appearance.

The CFA had a strong presence as usual, offering food, drink and information about the continued need for fire safety coming into the winter months. Many took the challenge of squirting the fire hose in an attempt to hit the target, or hugging it out with the life-size smoke detector.

Furthermore, what would the Warrandyte Festival be without the Eltham Steam and Stationary Engine Preservation Society? Or Woodcraft Manningham? Or the Scouts’ Giant Waterslide? These are the golden treasures that you look forward to seeing each year. Their presence evokes feeling of nostalgia for many.

As the festival drew to a close, we returned home tired and foot-sore but with fond memories of the weekend that was.

It is important to acknowledge all the hard work and preparation that went towards bringing the festival to life. A big thankyou and well done to the wonderful festival committee, the emergency service teams and everyone else who graciously volunteered their time. Once again, they coordinated another fantastic event. Your efforts do not go unnoticed!

Until next year…

Bank boost for youth


SIX Warrandyte students have been able to kick-start their further education with a scholarship from Warrandyte Community Bank.

Maddy Edsell, Josh White and Zac Ratcliffe have been announced as this year’s scholarship recipients and will join Mitch Dawson, Nik Henkes and Josh McMullen in their second year of financial support.

Passionate about the program, now in its fourth consecutive year, outgoing chairman Sarah Wrigley conducted the evaluation of the scholarship applications.

“We had a fantastic response to the call for applications again this year, our biggest year so far,” Sarah said.

“We had a number of very worthy applicants, and it was a hard decision.”

The Warrandyte Community Bank is proud to support students in their tertiary study. It is part of the branch’s commitment to building a stronger Warrandyte community and another way in which the bank is supporting local youth.

With $5000 to pay for study related expenses such as course fees, equipment, book and travel expenses the scholarship can help ease some of the financial burden.

“It’s a big step moving from school to university and is made much bigger if students have financial issues and other stresses,” Sarah said.

Other stresses have played a significant role in the lives of two of our young 2015 recipients with the loss of a parent. Josh’s mum lost her battle with cancer late last year.

He expressed his gratitude in telling the Diary: “Mum always dreamed of me going to university and chasing my dream job. With the Warrandyte Community Bank scholarship it will make this dream less stressful and more achievable.”

“$5000 will allow me to buy books, and commute to university without the stress of financial burden,” he added.

Josh, Zac and Maddy have all expressed sincere gratitude for the financial support awarded to them by the Warrandyte Community Bank.

Josh and Zac have commenced separate courses in Exercise and Sports Science and Maddy has started her four year degree in Occupational Therapy at Latrobe University.

Maddy sees her scholarship as an honour and a great relief, noting the connection between the bank and our community. She said, “Thanks to the Warrandyte community for supporting our Warrandyte Community Bank”.

In summing up, Sarah said: “I know the board is very proud of its ability to fund these three new scholarships and help Josh, Maddy and Zac in their academic endeavours.”

The annual Warrandyte Community Bank scholarship helps first-year university students on their path to tertiary education with a $10,000 bursary over two years ($5,000 each year). To be eligible, applicants must meet various criterion including residing in the local area, be academically motivated, actively involved in the community and be able to detail financial or social challenges which hinder their ability to undertake further study.

Most vote for cat curfew

THE locals have spoken and 80% of those who responded to the online cat poll have voted either for a complete curfew or for a dawn to dusk cat curfew in Warrandyte.

More than 1000 people had voted on the Warrandyte Community Association website when the poll closed at the end of March.

Final figures were 46% voted for a complete curfew, 34% for a dawn to dusk curfew and 20% voted for no curfew.

The Yes/No poll asked the question: Should there be a cat curfew ‘at all times’ or ‘from dawn to dusk’? It also included an option to comment.

Nillumbik Shire Council has an order under the Domestic Animals Act 1994, which requires cat owners to keep their pets securely confined between the curfew times of 7.30pm and 6am.

Although there is no curfew in place in Manningham, council strongly recommends cats be confined to owners properties.

WCA president Dick Davies said the response to the survey had been very high.

“Obviously the majority would prefer a curfew. But it’s important to note that this is not a vote against cats but a vote for responsible cat ownership,” Mr Davies said.

“Comments both for and against a curfew were mostly very reasonable. It’s heartening that Warrandyte can engage in a sensible level of debate about a sensitive topic as many people rely heavily on companion animals.”

The WCA’s Carole Lush, who has been actively involved with the poll says it’s obvious a review, update and implementation of a cat curfew is required.

“I am personally in favour of a 24-hour curfew, and 47 percent of the voters agreed with me,” Mrs Lush said.

“I believe that people who choose not to become cat owners have the right to keep neighbourhood cats out of their property during daylight hours. l frequently see at least two neighbourhood cats on our property and in the Manningham Council Reserve behind our land.

“I have planted a native garden for birds and wildlife and don’t want cats in my garden.”

The poll received national coverage in the Herald Sun and on Channel Ten’s Studio 10 morning show.

Research has shown that wandering cats are a major threat to wildlife.

Mr Davies said that WCA would be discussing the results with both councils. Nillumbik has indicated that it would take a “substantial poll” for councillors to raise the dawn to dusk curfew to a complete 24-hour curfew.

Five For Friday (Easter)


What’s happening in Warrandyte? Here’s our weekly Five for Friday.

1. Happy Easter everyone! don’t forget to nab your last minute Easter Eggs from Warrandyte Lollies & Treats, Cocoa Moon and Quinton’s IGA. Or any other local shop stocking the chocky eggs. Shop local!

2. Warrandyte Community Market is on Saturday April 4. All sorts of clothes, crafts, homemade cakes and jams, flowers and plants, and glorious food from Phil’s Burgers to Harry Hoo’s dim sims, the poffertjes ladies and more.

3. The footy is back! Well, the big stuff, anyway. Who’s it going to be? The Hawks again? The Swans? Or a suprise packet this year – maybe the Tigers, Kangas, Pies, Doggies, Cats or Blues? No better time to chomp on those Easter Eggs than Easter Sunday and Monday while watching the footy on TV.

4. Blatant plug for a loyal Diary advertiser – Concrete Booking Agency, concrete where and when you need it! Give the lads a call on 1300 266 278

5. Gown & Posy Fashion Parade on Thursday April 9 upstairs at The Grand Hotel in Warrandyte. All ticket sales will go to all Warrandyte fire stations excluding booking fee. Lots of fantastic raffle prizes, all money from the raffle will also go to the CFA. Say a big thank you and lets show them that we care by attending the fashion parade for a fun Girls Night Out! All tickets are $30 Buy your tickets online at: http://trybooking.com/HTDF

It’s festival time in Warrandyte


It’s got music. It’s got soul. Even designer ducks! Warrandyte Festival is coming your way March 20, 21 and 22. CHERIE MOSELEN walks you through the weekend that has it all.

BATTLE

Local youth bands amp it up in a battle for the top prize – a day in a recording studio – from 6pm on Friday March 20 at Stiggants Reserve. Feature headliners this year are Cash the Madmen and Selling Time. Soft drink, water and BBQ will be available for cash purchase on the night. This is a drug, smoke and alcohol free event. Admission is FREE.

ART

Enjoy Warrandyte Rotary’s 31st exhibition of work by local and interstate artists. Preview the art and join in the festivities at the gala champagne opening 7pm – 11pm on Friday March 20, at the Warrandyte Community Church in Yarra St. Tickets cost $25. The Art Show opens on Saturday and Sunday from 10am. A $5 ticket includes catalogue. Student entry is free.

ROAD CLOSURES

Yarra St, between the Kangaroo Ground Rd bridge roundabout and Harris Gully Rd roundabout, will be closed to traffic from 10.30am until about 12pm on Saturday March 21.

PARADE

This year’s festival monarchs and “Smart Arts” ambassadors, Cherry and Joff Manders, will lead the street parade from the Mechanics Institute in Yarra St to Stiggants Reserve. The official ceremony gets underway on Saturday March 21 at 11 am. Community groups, schools, sports clubs, vintage cars, fabulous floats to beat the band – don’t miss it!

MAIN STAGE MUSIC

The music starts at 12.15pm with local school and bush bands and continues with quality acts Winter Suns, Jakubi and Nudist Funk Orchestra among others. Sunday’s program features a variety of talent from 11.30am, including Wishful, The Solicitors and Davidson Brothers. Bring seating and a picnic, or buy food and drink across the weekend.

RIVERBANK STAGE

Uptown Brown kicks off the entertainment at noon on Saturday, followed by a diverse line-up including Sideglance, Tristan Bird and FLAXXON. Sunday’s program starts with everyone’s favourite Pet Parade at 9.30am. Triple J Unearthed High Acts will give music lovers plenty to look forward to in the afternoon.

DRESSED UP DUCKS

Pop in to the Top Tent, Upper Reserve, on Saturday between 10am – 5pm and Sunday 9am – 12pm to vote for your favourite designer duck in Warrandyte’s Most Decorated Ducks competition. Trophies awarded. Official winner announced Sunday at 11.45am.

RIDES

The Family Bike Ride meets at the Netball Courts in Taroona Avenue at 9am. Enjoy a leisurely ride through the festival precinct and Black Flat. Riders must provide own safety equipment and a responsible adult must accompany children under 15. Registration can be completed on the day. For rules and regulations visit the website www.warrandytefestival.org

BILLY CARTS

Have you got the ‘metal’ to join the billycart hall of fame? Carts line up at the top of Police Street from Sunday 9.30am. Registration takes place between 8.30 – 9.15am for children aged eight to 15 years. The event features a parent’s race, trophies and great prizes. Carts MUST meet strict safety criteria. For inquiries call 0418 357 282 or email contact@warrandyte festival.org

DUCK RACE

Up to 1000 plastic ducks take the plunge on Sunday at 2.30pm – the first to make it downriver from Police Street to Stiggants Street wins. Ducks can be purchased beforehand for $3 from local schools, or during festival weekend from the Information Caravan. Spec-quackular!

DISPLAYS

Discover a range of opportunities through local groups and service providers, including: Aboriginal art exhibition, Combined Emergency Services, Parks Victoria and Friends of Warrandyte State Park, Reconciliation Manningham, Warrandyte Community Garden, Warrandyte Community Association, Climate Action Now, Warrandyte Toy Library, local council, stationary and steam engines, miners, blacksmiths, woodcrafters, Animals on the Move, reptiles, and solar/ electric bikes. Warrandyte Tennis Club return with mini nets and radar gun.

SMART ARTS CENTRAL

On Saturday, this tent – located downhill from the Community Church – will give audience members an opportunity to get involved with some of the stage performers. Check out the Funky Monkeys children’s music and circus show from 12pm, followed by ukulele and African drumming workshops and pro- fessional storyteller. All for FREE!

NATURE ARTS PLAY

This popular activity, which returns with the help of Manningham council, can be found at Smart Arts Central this year. Children can build a unique play space of cubbies, nests and sculptures influenced by local flora, from 12.00pm on Sunday only.

FOLLIES

Written and directed by Warrandyte Theatre Company members, A Penny For Your Follies! is just the ticket to tickle your funny bone. Comic sketches and musical numbers will be staged on: March 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28 and April 9, 10 and 11, from 8pm at the Mechanics Institute Hall.

READ

In its 18th year, The Grand Read’s feature guest is Alex Skovron, author of five collections of poetry and a prose novella. Enjoy the work of quality poets and writers at Warrandyte’s annual literary night of nights from 7.30pm on Tuesday March 24, upstairs at the Grand Hotel. Tickets cost $20 (Concession $16) and include a light supper. Please purchase in advance from Warrandyte Neighbourhood House on 9844 1839. For more info visit the website www.warrandyte neighbourhoodhouse.org.au

Check out www.warrandyte festival.org for information including: program details, accessibility info, road closures, maps and registration forms. Facebookers can search ‘Warrandyte Festival’ for regular weekend updates.

Wild about our animals


THE towering Black Saturday bushfires in 2009 killed 173 people and led to an outpouring of grief among Australians.

But for Wonga Park firefighter Adrian Trigt, they had special meaning that added to the tragedy.

“I visited Kinglake after Black Saturday and the place looked like a warzone,” Mr Trigt said. “I opened an email from Wildlife Victoria and I saw that they needed more wildlife rescuers and so I jumped on board because saving wildlife is important: it does make a difference.”

Mr Trigt has since devoted his time to rescuing and transporting injured kangaroos to wildlife shelters for rehabilitation.

His work is highly specialised, with few people trained in how to rescue kangaroos.

It’s difficult to find volunteers who are willing to regularly spend several hours attempting to save an injured kangaroo, let alone buy the expensive equipment needed to rescue such large and speedy animals.

Car accidents are one of the leading causes of death for native animals such as kangaroos and much of Adrian’s work involves removing dead roos from roads and marking them with a white “X” so passersby know a rescuer has already attended.

“Unfortunately, most animals don’t usually survive car accidents,” Mr Trigt said. “If a kangaroo is lying there with two broken legs and it’s dying, I want to help put the animal out of its misery. You can’t just leave an animal there to suffer.”

Unfortunately, that’s how the overwhelming majority of wildlife injuries end.

Wildlife Victoria, a non-profit emergency response service for wildlife, sent volunteers to help injured animals on about 40,000 call outs last year.

The organisation’s relationship manager, Amy Amato, estimates 80 to 90 per cent of cases resulted in the animal being put down or dying before volunteers arrived at the scene.

“It’s pretty hard on our volunteers and sometimes they go weeks without being able to rescue a single animal,” Ms Amato says. “That’s when our job becomes about ending the animal’s suffering. Nearly every wildlife death or injury is directly or indirectly human-related, whether it’s a road accident, a kangaroo caught on a fence, a pet attack or a bird that has ingested plastic and needs surgery.”

Those animals with a chance of survival end up in the care of one of the organisation’s 500 active wildlife carers, such as Wonga Park’s Adriana Simmonds, who is a biologist and environmental educator from Columbia.

She has nursed around 2000 native Australian animals back to health and released them into the wild over the past 15 years.

Her immense love for Australia’s wildlife is evident to those around her, who haven’t seen her take a proper holiday in 15 years because her shelter always has animals needing her care.

Hello possum: Adriana Simmonds is passionate about her animal rescue work.

Running her wildlife shelter from her home is a 24-hour job, with baby animals requiring feeding throughout the night. It can also be heartbreaking work – sometimes all she can do is ease their suffering as they die from horrific injuries.

Yet Mrs Simmonds says she wouldn’t have her life any other way.

“You sacrifice yourself and at the end of the day you let them go and it’s like you’re letting go of your own child. It’s pure love,” she said.

“When they’re babies I’m a mum to them – I’m affectionate, I kiss them and hug them but as they start growing up I start the process of detachment. When I release them into the wild they are completely dehumanised so they don’t remember me. They need to be completely wild to survive on their own.”

During spring and summer, carers face an influx of orphaned babies, whose mothers have often been hit by cars as they migrate or they’re often attacked by cats whose owners don’t keep them indoors at night.

Mrs Simmonds says global warming is also making natural events such as bushfires more extreme and deadly for wildlife. But she says cutting down forests to make way for developments such as roads and houses have the greatest impact on wildlife, affecting the entire ecosystem.

“You’re limiting their source of food and shelter and the rate at which we destroy is never the same as the rate at which we restore habitat,” Mrs Simmonds said.

“Then animals can die trying to find other shelter. People often view possums in their roofs as pests and yet those possums are there because the trees they would usually live in have been cut down, but people don’t often make the connection.”

Wildlife advocates say many wildlife deaths could be prevented if the Victorian government established more wildlife corridors so native animals could migrate safely through Melbourne’s outer-suburbs such as Warrandyte and Wonga Park.

Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning spokesman Ewan Cook says a guide for wildlife corridors is being developed, which will be followed by a plan.

Meanwhile, Mrs Simmonds is busy looking after the animals in her care and visiting schools and community groups with her business Human Seeds, which educates people on wildlife issues while helping her fund the costs of running her shelter.

“I truly believe education is the only hope we have for the future and I teach people how to incorporate simple changes into their daily lives, which make a big difference to our wildlife,” she said.

“Probably the best thing people can do is plant native vegetation in their backyards – that way people are creating their own wildlife corridors.”

To report injured wildlife, call Wildlife Victoria on 1300 094 535 or visit www.wildlifevictoria.org.au

Hold the line


Warrandytians are well versed in a weekly whinge when it comes to telecommunications. So who ya gonna call? We called in Diary super sleuth David Hogg to investigate. He has some tips that just may put a smile … ahem … on your dial

HOME phone not working? Internet slow or dropping out? Warrandyte residents seem to think that there are unacceptable levels of problems in Warrandyte, but it is difficult to get specific evidence of this and the Diary is keen to get your feedback.
We are aware of recent prob- lems in the Brackenbury St area where Telstra contractors replaced a 50-pair cable and got the connections wrong leaving several households without phone or inter- net and it took multiple visits over two weeks to resolve all the problems.
But these things happen. Obviously with its hilly and semi-rural topography, one can expect slightly more disruption to services than city-dwellers would experience, but is there really a problem with the system here or are the problems more with the user? We’ll try to shed more light on this with a number of tips below.
Home phone
Pick up your home phone and dial 1 (to remove the dial tone). What do you hear? It should be pretty near to silence. If you hear a high-pitched hash noise you may have ADSL broadband and have neglected to fit a filter. If you hear crackling, there is some bad connection fault between your phone and the exchange. Check the connections at your phone and the wall. If it persists you may have to lodge a fault report with your supplier.
ADSL internet
If your internet service drops out or is intermittent, it is possible that you have other devices connected to the line which do not have a filter installed.
You must have an ADSL filter fitted at every phone socket in your house where equipment is connected; this includes fixed and cordless phones, fax machine, answering machine, security or medical alarm system, and any Foxtel box which connects to the phone line, and with the exception of the ADSL modem itself these should all be plugged into the “Local Phone” socket on the filter.
If, after checking this, the problem persists then the next time it drops out check the lights on your ADSL mo- dem. There should be lights for “ADSL” and “Internet” and these should be green or flashing. If they are not on or are red, there is some problem with your service. Start by unplugging everything in your home connected to the phone line except the modem and see if the problem persists. If so, you may need to call your supplier.

Does your internet seem slow? Then let’s do a speed test and find out exactly how fast it is. These numbers may sound a little technical but bear with us; if we can find out what you’re actually getting as opposed to what you should be getting, we can see if you have a problem. In Google type “ADSL speed test” or go to www.whistleout.com.au/ Broadband/Speed-Test

Find out your download speed in Mbit/sec. This will depend enormously on the length of the cable between you and the exchange. Theo- retically the maximum speed possible with ADSL2+ here is 20 Mbit/sec but in practice that isn’t what you’ll get. The table below shows very approximately the speed you should be getting.

If your download speed is way short of this, you have a problem. New customers are now being connected to ADSL2+ equipment in the exchange but some existing customers are still connected to outdated ADSL1 equipment which will restrict you to around 5 Mbit/sec.

If you live less than 3km from the exchange and are only getting 5 Mbit/sec down- load speed, check with your supplier that you do, in fact, have an ADSL2+ service, and if not ask to be moved across to ADSL2+. This they can do and it shouldn’t cost you anything.
Wi-Fi internet
Your ADSL modem may provide you with a Wi-Fi signal in the home for your phone, laptop, iPad or tablet. Even though the Wi-Fi speed be- tween the tablet and the home modem might be hundreds of Mbit/sec (which is great if you are transferring files locally between devices) your inter- net speed will only be as good as your ADSL connection. For good Wi-Fi, your device does need at least two out of five bars of signal strength. If your Wi-Fi does not reach to the far ends of your house, consider repositioning your modem centrally, or you can buy a Wi-Fi extender unit.

Wireless internet and mobile phones
You might be connecting your computer or phone to the internet using a 3G or 4G SIM card in a mobile phone, a USB dongle that plugs into your computer, a dedicated mobile hotspot device, or via a dongle in a clever modem that uses ADSL when available but switches to wireless when the ADSL goes down. There is now reasonably good coverage of 3G and 4G for phones and internet throughout War- randyte, but there are many dead spots. The three major suppliers, Telstra, Optus and Vodaphone, have quite dif- ferent coverage areas, but all have very good maps on their websites showing this, so you need to check carefully which supplier is best for your location.

For internet purposes, you can again run the speed tests as outlined above. On a 3G system you should get download speeds around 6 Mbit/ sec, on 4G anything up to 25 Mbit/sec, and if you’re for- tunate enough to be in your supplier’s 4GX or 4G+ areas they claim up to 100M bit/sec.

National Broadband Network
Warrandyte is not on the NBN, and if you search their website you will see that the NBN rollout has not started in this area. A year ago their website indicated 2018 as a possible timeframe for start of NBN rollout. The Diary sought information as to when this rollout would start, and was advised that it would not be within the next two years. We are advised that since the new Government has come into office they have required the NBN to remove specific date indications from their website.

When NBN is eventually available you will get a basic service at 12 Mbit/sec for roughly the same cost as now, with options to pay extra for various speed increments up to 100 Mbit/sec.

Speak to us
Do we have an unreasonable level of phone or internet problems which are specific to Warrandyte? The Diary welcomes your feedback.

Contact davidhogg99@bigpond.com and stay tuned for a fol- low-up in the next edition of the Diary. We would love to hear your thoughts

On the write side of the road

Cherie Moselen talks to two local poets about shared geography and an award that puts them both on a prestigious literary map.

WHAT are the odds that two Warrandyte poets who live on the same road would win the same major poetry award, one after the other?

Somewhat doubtful, given the Melbourne Poets Union (MPU) International Poetry Competition annually sees 300-400 poems narrowed to a shortlist of a dozen or less.

Chance is a fine thing, but artistic skill is most likely the reason residents John Jenkins and Carmel Macdonald-Grahame are hot property as the 2013 and 2014 winners of this high profile competition*.

It’s a good thing I manage to interview them together as neither are the type to toss accolades on their own literary bonfires.

Carmel is glowing about rising stars like Eltham writer Lisa Jacobsen, who has been published in Australia, Canada, Indonesia, the UK and the United States. (One of Warrandyte’s treasured Grand Read performers, Lisa also won the Adelaide Festival John Bray Poetry Award last year and was shortlisted in four other national awards.)

However, she makes no mention of having two poems recently longlisted in this year’s fiercely contested Ron Pretty Award.

“It’s a remarkable achievement on the back of the 2014 MPU win and recent publication of her first novel by University of Western Australia Press,” John Jenkins says, filling me in on Carmel’s successes, but waving away any attempt I make to talk about his own as an award-winning poet and celebrated writer of over 20 books published in various genres.

There are more than a few literary triumphs between the two, and while both allow awards establish credibility and garner peer recognition, their value to each seems to lie in the confidence they generate: that the work was on the right track.

“Sometimes I revisit old writing that I’ve abandoned and resuscitate it, because I feel there is still something vital there and a particular competition might be a likely place for airing it,” says Carmel. “It gives me an endpoint and makes me finish the unfinished work, which is a reward in itself. It’s an added bonus if it wins.”

John agrees: “I often persist with a piece of writing, drafting and redrafting, and the formal appreciation means the extra work was worth it. It validates the process – I’ve sent it off to a competition and the judge liked it, the piece is finished and it’s as good as it can be.”

However, Carmel says she is “chuffed” about winning this particular award.

“Part of the pleasure with the MPU prize was being able to follow in John’s footsteps a little, as we’ve occasionally worked on poetry together. Also, the Melbourne Poets Union is a special point of connection for me,” she says.

“When I moved to Victoria seven years ago, it was through this ‘union of poets’ that I found out what was going on in Melbourne for writers.”

“Of course, now I have an abundance of artistic connections virtually at my doorstep, many of whom come together from time to time at the Grand Read.”

Her mention of The Grand Read – a Warrandyte Festival event, in its 18th year – launches John onto a topic he is happy to talk about and is clearly fond of.

“We have a wealth of literary talent in our shire, an embarrassment of riches really, and Warrandyte is lucky to have a fantastic annual event in which to celebrate some of them.”

“There’s lot’s of lovely food, and drinks at the bar, which gives The Grand Read an enjoyable and festive buzz,” he says.

“Every year there are special guests, some with international reputations, so the literary quality of the work is very fine. But there’s never anything stiff or stodgy about it. MC Jock Macneish sets exactly the right tone and the readers are great performers of their own work, so there’s a dimension of entertainment.”

He adds: “Diary readers, certainly anyone interested in writing, should come along and be prepared to be surprised and delighted by a great night out.”

Both Carmel (as an organiser of the event) and John will be appearing at Warrandyte’s Grand Read, upstairs at The Grand Hotel at 7.30pm on Tuesday March 24.

For more information about the event, contact Warrandyte Neighbourhood House on 9844 1839 or email info@warrandyteneighbourhoodhouse.org.au

*John’s 2013 MPU winning poem is titled When he read the poem in the room above the stairs. Carmel’s 2014 MPU winning poem is titled Wreck.

Doncare produces iMatter app

Screen Shot 2015-03-10 at 12.34.52 pmSOME people may find it hard to realise the warning signs of a potentially violent partnership at first. Young or old, no one is immune to the psychological predatory behaviour that domestic violence abusers use to isolate victims before subjecting them to more physical abuse.

Unfortunately, when family and friends try to intervene they are pushed away because the victim is in denial about their situation: their judgement clouded by emotion.

As is common in abusive relationships, the victim may experience feelings of shame, intimidation and fear, compounded by the isolation from support networks that generally accompanies domestic abuse.

To combat this, local Manningham counselling service Doncare has developed a revolutionary new app called iMatter, which takes the perceived judgement and pressure out of identifying and accepting that one may be in a harmful relationship.

The app is designed to help young people recognise the early signs of abusive and controlling behaviour and empower them to avoid and leave unhealthy relationships.

iMatter includes images, quizzes, videos, a diary and links to information about domestic abuse services in every country in the world. It also includes positive messages designed to encourage resilience and self-esteem in young people.

The project is managed by Youth Foundation facilitator Katherine Georgakopoulos and Doncare’s placement student Jo Maddock, who both oversaw the launch of the iMatter app on February 14 by Australian of the Year and anti-domestic violence campaigner Rosie Batty.

“These types of relationships aren’t always as obvious as a black eye or split lip, so it is vital victims are empowered to deal with psychological abuse as well,” Rosie says.

“I think throughout our communities, at any age, we’re learning it’s not just about physical violence,” she said. “Violence is also psychological, which includes verbal. It’s not just about physical harm, it’s far more complex than that.”

Batty said it wasn’t until she was 40 that she finally realised the psychological and physical abuse wasn’t her fault, proving the importance of young people being able to recognise the warning signs early.

Recent Australian research has revealed that 22% of women under the age of 20 have experienced intimate partner violence and what’s even more concerning is that many young women misinterpret behaviour like extreme jealousy and controlling tendencies as signs of love and affection. From these figures it is clear that an app of this kind is long overdue and the creators have already seen an overwhelming response.

Doncare director Carmel O’Brien says, “We hear again and again from young people that they are putting up with things in relationships that are really very disrespectful and sometimes frightening.”

Working closely with domestic violence victims, the Doncare team is aware that young women feel they are rarely warned about the very fine line between controlling behaviours and abuse. The app also promotes self-esteem and confidence, as Batty believes low self-esteem can lead young women to enter and remain in damaging relationships.

“If you’re approaching a relationship when you have no self-esteem, you’re most likely to enter into a toxic relationship,” Batty said. “It will not get better, it will wear you down and will reduce you to a very low point.”

Her most important message? “If (the relationship) doesn’t feel right, get out of it. Get out.”

If you or someone you know is impacted by domestic violence, call 1800 RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au

In an emergency, call 000.

The iMatter app is available at iTunes and Google play stores.

Calmer waters for Melbourne Hill Rd

A SOLUTION to Melbourne Hill Road’s drainage issue could become the benchmark for other ecologically sensitive catchments within Manningham.

An epic struggle by residents for sustainable, cost effective stormwater management has inspired a new approach by Manningham council.

Although originally set to enforce an unpopular and costly scheme for localised flooding issues in the catchment, after sustained community campaigning council engineers are now considering alternative solutions.

Council has obtained a $50,000 grant from the state-funded Living Rivers Program (a previously unexplored option), which will be matched from council coffers to provide a $100,000 budget. This will allow investigation of more environmentally sustainable stormwater management possibilities in the troubled catchment.

Consulting engineering group BMT WBM has been appointed to conduct this feasibility study, which is planned for completion by the end of May.

Council has also undertaken a more consultative approach to management of the issue. Formalised in a ‘Terms of Reference’ document instigated by the community representative panel, this approach is an effort to bring more open and informed discussion around the issue.

Highly regarded strategic environmental engineer and president of Stormwater Australia, Andrew Allen, was a welcome new addition to the recent reference panel meeting.

It is expected Allen, who had been seconded from Manningham council to the office of Living Victoria during much of the original resident/council debate, will add his considerable depth of knowledge in sustainable flood mitigation to the project.

Cr Sophy Galbally, who has continued to campaign for a balanced solution to flood management in the catchment is satisfied with the progress so far.

“I was pleased to meet the senior executives from BMT WBM at the recent reference panel meeting where residents, council engineers and ward councillors were able to convey the issues they hope this study may be able to address. I sincerely hope the consultants’ report, which is welcomed by all, will provide council with innovative and sustainable options for all areas in need of flood mitigation, particularly in the Mullum Mullum ward,” Cr Galbally said.

Residents’ spokesperson Peter Noye told the Diary: “The representative panel stand committed to a more environmentally sustainable and economical outcome. We thank the councillors for voting towards seeking a more cost effective and sustainable alternative.”

The next community meeting on the Melbourne Hill Rd issue will be held at Warrandyte Uniting Church, Taroona Ave tonight (March 10) at 8pm.

VIDEO: Warrandyte chooks


The Diary checks out some chooks and their owners to see what has Warrandyte buzzing about free-range chickens … and a few ducks!

Setting a wonderful eggs-ample


Warrandyte chicken“YOU must never run out of eggs,” is the common response when people know you have chickens.

However, for many Warrandytians, it’s not about the eggs. There are so many delightful reasons for having chickens, with eggs being a bonus.

Adjoining neighbours Adata and John share several chickens between their homes with a mobile coop made from the frame of an old barbeque, a shipping box and pallets. The result is a cleverly designed home for Scarlet, Darling, Lucy, Beautiful Girl, Belina and Bob that for the past two years has been moved from home to home on a roster basis.

If one family is away on a holiday, the other family is able to care for them.

“When you rent, it’s hard to ask a landlord for permission to build a permanent structure,” says John. “This way we can have chickens and share them with our friends.”

Emil, Marcel, Nell and Natalia all help with caring for the chickens, including collecting the eggs, putting them away at night and topping up the water, especially on hot days.

“They all have different temperaments and personalities,” says Agata. “They are curious and adventurous and a little cheeky sometimes by trying to get into the veggie garden.”

Mother of two, Natalie, from North Warrandyte has converted an old cubby into a sweet little home safe from foxes for her Rhode Island Reds – Poeey, Twinkles, Sparkles and My Chicken. Laying well means they often have more eggs than they need and either swap the eggs for other produce with friends or give them away.

Natalie and husband Ben’s aim is to upgrade the coop by designing a way for them to eat more grass which improves their Omega 6 balance.

Warrandyte chickens“Having chickens is calming. You start pottering and realise you are part of the circle of life and reconnecting with the fundamentals of living,” says Natalie.

Lynda not only has chickens but a number of charismatic ducks, the boss of the roost being Barry. They all live together in the Taj Mahal of coops that has been added to and improved over the years to accommodate the chickens and ducks as well as keep out the foxes.

“I’d recommend digging well down into the ground with your wire, at least 500mm to keep them out and I’ve also concreted part of the coop floor to keep out the rats,” says Lynda.

“Wasps aren’t too much of a problem if I avoid putting out too many food scraps.”

With both the chickens and ducks as good layers, Lynda used to sell her freerange eggs at work as they were in such demand – as Julie Quinton quickly discovered at our local IGA supermarket after banning caged hen eggs and stocking only freerange.

Currently, Daphne is broody and has been sitting on the duck eggs for a while, which will probably hatch in the next few days.

In the meantime, 5kg Barry is quite the stud with his harem of stunning white companions Daphne, Lulu and Lizzie.

On the side of a hill, facing north and overlooking the Yarra, lives an eclectic family of chickens.

Annette Lion has owned chickens and ducks for 14 years.

“Each duck has their own personality,” says Annette, as a collection of Bantams, Light Sussex and Pom Pom Heads saunter free around the garden.

With names like Carlotta, Bluebell and Nessie it’s easy to see why Annette’s daughters Luna and Mikaia enjoy having their chickens around.

They are so tame, they’ll even sit on their heads.

We couldn’t find Speckles but she turned up later in the day, having been gone for 10 days. Annette found her sitting on 12 eggs!

It’s obvious that the bonuses of owning chickens is not just the eggs but showing children where food comes from, how to care for them, how they can produce great fertiliser for the garden and the sheer entertainment of watching their antics.

Warrandyte chickens

If you’d like to share your own chicken stories, please tell us at the Diary by emailing info@warrandyte diary.com.au

VIDEO: See our chooks story on Diary TV at warrandytediary.com.au

EPA called in to investigate


VICTORIA’S Environment Protection Authority (EPA) followed up a request from local CFA officers to investigate the cause of spontaneous fire eruptions in Park Orchards recently.

CFA crews were called to Stintons Reserve twice in six weeks to attend to fire incidents that appear to have been ignited by “self-combusting material”.

“We asked the EPA to inspect the site to determine the cause of the eruptions, as our fire investigation team were satisfied they were not deliberately lit,” South Warrandyte CFA captain Greg Kennedy told the Diary.

The fires ignited at the reserve’s fenced-off greyhound slipping track. The reserve is above the original site of the Park Orchards tip, which closed in the early 1990s.

The track has been free of fire incidents since its inception about 12 years ago.

Mr Kennedy stressed it was purely a precautionary measure.

“I felt a bit uneasy given the history of the reserve and the fact that it happened twice in a matter of six weeks,” he said.

An EPA spokesperson said they had attended the site along with Manningham council officers and determined the cause of the outbreaks to be naturally occurring decomposition. He advised that they eliminated “the possibility of a sub-surface fire”.

“The fire was caused by a mixture of decomposing organic matter (sawdust in this case), generating enough heat to ignite the sawdust,” he said.

The fires caused concern about methane leaks among Park Orchards residents, as reported on 3AW’s Rumour File program.

That was understandable given what happened at a Cranbourne landfill several years ago.

A methane issue resulted in a class action against the City of Casey and the EPA that saw residents awarded $23.5 million in compensation.

Many such domestic waste dumps (including Stintons Reserve) were closed over before the introduction of more stringent regulations in 2004, requiring all landfills to be lined to provide leak protection.

The EPA subsequently reviewed metropolitan landfills, putting councils on notice to clean up sites where pollution of land or groundwater posed a potential risk to human health.

In 2013, the environmental watch- dog issued a pollution abatement notice to Manningham council.

The EPA issued the warning after con- ducting a compliance inspection at Stintons Reserve to assess management of contaminants leaking from the closed landfill.

The notice, which was later amend- ed to allow additional time for the works to be completed, stated: “Water sampling results and an assessment of the pipe integrity shows leachate from the landfill is contaminating the surface water piped beneath the landfill and the surrounding ground.”

It also stipulated: “… that this non-compliance, or likely non-compliance, must be remedied.”

Manningham council’s director of assets and engineering Leigh Harrison said the landfill had been rehabilitated in accordance with applicable standards at that time.

He confirmed that council had been “progressively upgrading” management of the site over the past 12 months “to accord with current standards”.

Mr Harrison said: “The present situation offers no threat to the health of those persons using the oval, BMX facility or the slipping track. The works will simply result in a renewed, and improved, leachate management system.”

With regard to recent fire activity at the site, Mr Harrison was adamant there was “no evidence of any issue with methane generation from the landfill contributing to these issues”.

The EPA pollution abatement notice stipulates that all relevant works must be completed by May 31 2015.

The arrival of warmer weather has also triggered community fears of recurring spontaneous fire activity at the slipping track.

Manningham council advised: “Council has spoken to the club and suggested that the track surface, which becomes compacted, be ‘turned over’ on a semi regular basis throughout the year and especially the summer months.”

Rabbits on the hop

BRADLEYS Lane residents have launched a campaign to rid their street of rabbits, saying they are destroying gardens, causing erosion along the banks of the Yarra River and competing with native wildlife for food and habitat.

A group of residents have held a meeting with Nillumbik council hoping to mobilise local support for a pest controller to come out in March or April to bait the rabbits with Pindone, a poison commonly used to control rabbits in Victoria.

Their proposed baiting program would require around 20 days, with the poison generally taking six to 10 days to work, affecting the rabbits’ livers and causing them to die from internal bleeding.

One of the residents leading the campaign, Janice Davies, says 20 people in her street have expressed their concerns about the damage caused by rabbits.

“Over the last year we have noticed a lot more rabbit droppings across our property,” Mrs Davies said.

“I also planted a whole lot of native grass one day and I thought I’d put barriers around them in the morning but by the time I went out the next morning the rabbits had already eaten the grass down to ground level.

“This campaign is about getting as many people in the street involved as possible. We’re taking people’s concerns on board and we’re finding out how to do it without harming pets.”

Another Bradleys Lane resident, Paul Fitzsimons, noticed rabbit numbers increasing when they started destroying his garden last year.

“We plant native vegetation to attract wildlife so when rabbits come along and eat it all, it’s very costly and very frustrating,” Paul said.

Mrs Davies says Nillumbik council has offered to pay for half of the associated costs for hiring a pest controller, bringing the cost to $60 per household.

Nillumbik mayor Helen Coleman says council regularly offers subsidies when residents form a local rabbit action group.

However, the Diary didn’t receive confirmation that council would provide assistance for Bradleys Lane residents at the time of publication.

The anti-rabbit proposal comes as Melbourne Water and Parks Victoria

plan to launch their own rabbit-baiting programs along the Yarra River and through the state park.

Janice says while Melbourne Water and Parks Victoria support the plan, they cannot provide financial assistance.

The Diar y understands residents would have a greater chance of drastically reducing the rabbit population around Bradleys Lane if they start their program around the same time that Melbourne Water and Parks Victoria commence their rabbit control program this year.

A rabbit baiting program involving the Osborne Peninsula Landcare Group about four years ago inspired

the group of Bradleys Lane residents to start informing neighbours about the issue and gauging support for a unified pest control plan.

It’s estimated about 80 percent of residents in Osborne Rd, Hamilton Rd and Koornong Cres were involved in the Osborne Peninsula Landcare Group program.

Ann Penrose, who is part of the Osborne Peninsula Landcare Group, says the high number of households involved made the program successful at reducing rabbit numbers.

“We have baited every year, usually around February or March,” Mrs Penrose said.

“For the first three years we baited the whole peninsula but eventually we managed to get the rabbit numbers down so low that we didn’t have to do all of the area.”

However, rabbits have few natural predators and with females known to have up to 14 babies per litter several times a year, Ann warns that rabbit populations can quickly become out of control.

“We have noticed there’s an increasing number of rabbits recently and we can never eliminate rabbits – only control them. That’s where educating the community comes in,” Mrs Penrose said.

“Controlling rabbit populations is on-going and it’s the residents’ responsibility to keep their properties clear of rabbits.”

Nationally, rabbits are estimated to cost more than $200 million a year in control measures and lost productivity, and as Bradleys Lane resident Cameron Bailey knows, rabbits can affect one neighbour but not the next.

“I’ve only seen one rabbit on my property in the two and a half years that I’ve been living here,” Cameron said.

“They’re not a problem on our property but I would probably support the plan because we’re all for removing non-native wildlife.”

Some have expressed reservations about the plan.

“I’d be happy to get on board if there’s enough residents on board and it’s likely to be effective,” Paul Fitzsimons said.

“In the meantime, we’ve taken our own immediate steps to address the measure. Since we put in fences everything has been fine and our chocolate lilies are starting to come up again but if you fence all of your property then there’s the issue of limiting the movement of animals.”

Others say rabbits are causing problems across Warrandyte, including Mitchell Ave, Gold Memorial Rd, West End Rd and along the Mullum Trail.

One Warrandyte resident commented on the Diary’s Facebook page that she rolled her ankle while playing cricket in her backyard in a rabbit hole that appeared overnight.

Elizabeth Wood, who lives in Stiggants St, says she has been baiting her property for years, yet rabbits are still eating away at her garden.

“I have been killing the rabbits but as I get rid of one lot a new lot move in,” Elizabeth said.

“The rabbits live in Stiggants Reserve and the church yard where there is an area of undergrowth. We have asked for it to be cleaned up to no avail at this stage.”

Campaigners hope baiting will begin in March or April, with Mrs Davies indicating the plan could still go ahead with 20 participants.

“Even with 20 residents we would still have a really good chance of reducing the damage that rabbits are causing to vegetation around our street, but of course, the more people involved the more success you’re likely to have,” she said.

ENTER: Mural competition and short story


Grand Wall Entry Form

Calling all

budding

artists

THE concrete wall alongside the drive-through at the Grand Hotel Warrandyte may be looking a bit bare at the moment, but it won’t be for much longer when a grand design appears there in the near future.

All budding artists in Warrandyte are invited to design a mural to be painted on the wall, with prizes offered to the best five designs and a major prize for the winning entry.

Entries for the competition will close on March 10 and winners will be announced on stage at the Warrandyte Festival on Saturday March 21.

See more details in the advertisement on Page 28 and entry forms and conditions are available at www.warrandytediary.com.au and from www.grandhotelwarrandyte.com.au

Five for Friday: Jan 23, 2015

FIVE FOR FRIDAY …
1. It’s the long weekend! Loads on, cafes a hive of activity, go for a walk along our beautiful river, barbecues and, of course, there’s always something going on at our Grand Hotel Warrandyte whether it be sport on the big screen, entertainment, cold beer, tasty wines and great food!
2. Australia Day is Monday and Manningham City Council has some fun for everyone at MC2. Head there at 7pm Monday for free face painting, a sausage sizzle, magic show, family movie and lots more! Details: www.manningham.vic.gov.au/australiaday
3. We love our Warrandyte Community Bank Branch and we can thank the Bendigo Bank for its excellent scholarship program which has helped so many people in our community. So if you have your Uni offer and not sure how you’re going to afford it, apply right now – APPLICATIONS CLOSE TODAY – at bit.ly/benscholarship
4. Yes, it’s still cricket season, but it’s also time to register for the 2015 footy season so the Warrandyte Junior Football Club is putting out the registration call. You can do this online from here www.warrandytejfc.org/REGISTRATION.
And while you’re at it, mark down in your diary Feb 8 (rego and meet the coach day) and Feb 22nd (season launch at Clifford Park). GO BLOODS!!!
5. The Diary is back (Feb 8) so if you’re a local business don’t forget to get your 2015 ad bookings in by no later than next Friday (Jan 30) and be a part of the first bumper edition of the year! It coincides with our excellent new website rolling out next week – great paper, great website, great social media integration and cheap rates. We look after our businesses who advertise with us, so give us a call – 9844 0555 – and find out how it can work for you and why so many other businesses have flocked to the Diary, the current CNAV ‘Newspaper of the Year’, in the past 12 months – it’s the people’s newspaper. Everyone reads the Diary!

 

The Diary goes global


Thanks to our readers, the Warrandyte Diary is making its way to all corners of the globe, including the Middle East, Asia, the United States. Here are some of our favourites!

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Fireball


The successful Fireball event in October raised thousands of dollars for the local CFA groups

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