Monthly Archives: March 2022

Manningham’s new pet plan

HOW MANNINGHAM’S cats and dogs are managed over the next four years is in the final stages of review, with Council currently seeking community comment on its draft Domestic Animal Management Plan 2022–2025.
Local Councils in Victoria must develop a fresh Domestic Animal Management Plan (DAMP) every four years under the Domestic Animal Act 1994.
The plan exclusively manages cats and dogs; other animals and livestock are managed under different legislation, such as the Livestock Management Act 2010.
In June 2021, Manningham Council began developing its latest DAMP.
At that time, Warrandyte Diary contacted local animal advocacy group Friends of Manningham Dogs and Cats (FOMDAC) about what they would like to see in the 2022–2025 DAMP.

“FOMDAC would like to see cat curfews explored, especially in environmentally sensitive areas.
It is now rare to see dogs roaming in the streets, and we would like to see owners confine their cats to their own backyards.
It would be sensible for owners to keep their cats indoors/confined at night (we must protect our local flora and fauna).
We would like to see plans to safely assist residents in evacuating their animals in an emergency.”

In their statement, FOMDAC went on to talk about the need for more off-lead dog areas and better access to poo bins for dog owners.

“FOMDAC would also like to see more poo bins along walking trails.
Aranga Reserve has been a great success and a model which other councils have followed.
FOMDAC believes there is a need for more secure off-leash parks similar to Aranga.”

Talking points in the proposed DAMP include a 12-month pilot for a 24-hour cat curfew, a review of the number of dog waste bins, and investigations into fenced, dog off-leash areas east of the Mullum Mullum Creek.
The 29-page draft DAMP is available to read on Council’s Your Say website, which also includes a feedback form; anyone with a vested interest in the welfare of cats and dogs, in Manningham, over the next four years is encouraged to read the draft plan and supply any relevant feedback before April 12.
According to local government data, 10,410 dogs and 4,155 cats are registered in Manningham, which is an increase from data collected in 2019/20.
Visit yoursay.manningham.vic.gov.au/damp to have your say on this important issue.

Planned burn in Warrandyte

UPDATED: Thursday March 24

FOREST FIRE Management Victoria (FFMVic) will be conducting a planned burn at Pigtail Track in Warrandyte State Park this Saturday, March 26.

This 10.9 hectare bushfire risk reduction burn is on the eastern edge of Warrandyte State Park.

Walking tracks in Warrandyte State Park in and near the burn area will be closed to the public, smoke will be visible in the area and FFMVic are expecting the smoke to move towards the south Saturday morning, then towards the north and north east later in the day, which will mean it may be smoky in Warrandyte township and could drift towards houses as the wind changes.

See map for burn area.

If there is visible smoke in the area it is advisable to close doors and windows and take any necessary health precautions.

Map courtesy FFMVic

Stay informed about planned burning

Sign up forautomated notifications about planned burns near you at Planned Burns Victoria www.vic.gov.au/plannedburns
Visit www.ffm.vic.gov.au
Call the VicEmergency Hotline on freecall 1800 226 226
Download the Vic Emergency app to see the location of ignited burns.
Callers who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech/communication impairment can contact the VicEmergency Hotline via the National Relay Service on 1800 555 677.

Breaking Biases on International Women’s Day

MANNINGHAM Council was host to an International Women’s Day Morning Tea adopting the theme of #BreaktheBias.
The free event was held on March 8 in Manningham’s recently refurbished Function Centre and included a presentation and a lively panel discussion facilitated by TV and radio presenter Shelley Ware.
Shelley was joined by Asherly Bradac (disability advocate / Manningham Disability Advisory Committee), Varvara Ioannou (Food For Thought Network), Sally Goldner (Founding member of Transgender Victoria) and Aunty Irene Norman (Mullum Mullum Gathering Place).
The 2022 #BreaktheBias campaign seeks to create a gender equal world that is free of bias, discrimination and stereotypes.
Manningham Councillor Laura Mayne said that as a local council in 2022 they aim to achieve gender equality in every policy they do.
“We have just recently established a gender committee, which I am a part of, and it’s a really big action — also in gender diversity we have just established a new LGBTIQA+ diversity action plan.
“We are also undertaking a gender audit and considering our staff and operations, which is something we are continuously reviewing,” she said.
Guest speaker Aunty Irene Norman, a proud Wailwan woman and a Mullum Mullum Elder, said that breaking the bias means teaching
people — from going into schools and talking to the children and educating the teachers — is the first step to seeing change.
“One of the first things we say to teachers is, there is no such thing as a bad question, people are very uncomfortable about asking questions to first peoples of this country — gender bias, women’s issues, men’s issues, acceptance issues — don’t be frightened to ask is the biggest thing we teach them.
“How are you ever going to learn if you don’t ask questions, how are people going to learn if we don’t teach them?” she said.
Panellist Sally Goldner, an LGBTIQA+ diversity educator and founding member of Transgender Victoria, said transgender people
are not being represented at the higher levels.
“I feel mistrustful to people in positions of power because I feel trans people were often spoken for and spoken about without our consent and in ways we shouldn’t be talked about,” she said.
Ms Goldner said the value of curiosity and being open to learning is essential to breaking the bias.
“I hope we get to the point where International Women’s Day is celebrated with just the positives and we don’t have to talk about the
negatives,” she said.
Asherly Bradac single mother of four children, all living with disability and additional needs, said breaking the bias is looking within
ourselves and to understand what our own biases are — “it doesn’t take a genius or a degree to be kind.”
Facilitator of the event Shelley Ware, who has over 20 years’ experience in the media as a radio and television presenter on both
local and national AFL football news shows, said that although she has literally lived bias her whole career, we are now seeing more
women talking about AFL and having different conversations.
Aunty Irene Norman finished off the #BreaktheBias International Women’s Day discussion panel by saying: “It doesn’t matter who is biased against you, don’t hide — show yourself and your abilities, be yourself, hold your head up high and look people in the eye.”

Scotty wows them in Beijing

WARRANDYTE’S own snowboarding legend has been pipped at the post in his run for a Gold medal at the 2022 Beijing Olympics.
He was a favourite for Gold after recently bringing home the goods from the X-Games in January.
James entered the final in second position and was hopeful of taking the top honour.
After a stumble on the first run put him in 10th position, a blistering second run, with a score of 92.5 gave him the lead going into the all- important final run.
“We are lost for words right now, but we knew that was going to be an improvement — forget the rest, we have the best with Scotty James,” the lead commentator said.
When he couldn’t best it in his final run, it was down to the final competitor, Japan’s Ayumu Hirano as the only one who could beat him for the prize.
Scotty still had gold in his sights, while spectators held their breath as the Japanese rider pulled out a spectacular performance and snatching the Gold with a 96.0.
James now adds an Olympic Silver medal to the Bronze he took home from Pyeong Chang in 2018 and says he has his sights set for Gold in Milan to complete the set.
He farewelled his long-time rival, Shaun White, for whom these games are his swansong.
In a post-event interview with Channel 7, James said: “I have had such a great time here in Beijing.
“This has been such a special Winter Games.
“This guy [White] is very, very special”.
He labelled White the Greatest of All Time.
“To Shaun, obviously huge respect to him — the guy is the GOAT… it’s been incredible to be here with you.
White then praised James’ silver- medal-winning run: “Crushed it! I was seeing the switch back doubles to the deck … I was like, come on!
“You are just crushing them effortlessly — to see you throwing down is just awesome.”
Then Warrandyte’s hero asked his rival for support in his campaign to compete in 2026, saying: “If you have the time, I have one more medal I need — if you want to help.”
White laughed as he replied: “I will back you!”
And rest assured, so will Warrandyte.

Students show their support for a local hero
By CLAIRE LAMBERT
WARRANDYTE PRIMARY School (WPS) sports teacher Sally Freemantle was thrilled when Channel 7 contacted her, asking students at WPS to be filmed showing their support of snowboarder Scotty James in the Winter Olympics.
Students were eager to get behind this and excitedly prepared banners and streamers to wave to remind Scotty that his hometown was behind him every step of the way to Olympic glory!
Photographs of the students made it to the official Australian Olympic Team Facebook Page and appeared on the Channel 7 coverage of the Winter
Olympics and Sunrise.
It was a fantastic experience that all students enjoyed being a part of and a great introduction for most of our students to the sport of Snowboarding.

Conscious breathing: what is it and how to optimise the benefits

[WELLBEING]
By LAURA ROODHOUSE

Photo: Rubin Utama
Facilitator Bryden McGregor

BREATHING IS something we unconsciously do every single day, however when done correctly and consciously, there’s some incredible power to breathing.
Roughly eight years ago, when I was first fully immersed in the health and wellness space, I came across breathwork through a facilitator who just returned to Melbourne after teaching for some time in Germany.
It was the newest health fad across Europe and seemed somewhat straightforward, however, I soon realised that this underrated practice had some incredible and transformative benefits.
Practising conscious breath also made people so empowered when they recognised that breath is so readily accessible.
It can be done anywhere and at any time.
Before I started practising breathwork and mindful breathing, I really had no idea just how shallow my breath was.
As I became more consistent in my practice, I realised that I was only going as far as my chest, and when I became stressed or anxious the shallow breathing was only making those feelings worse.
While the body is a complete masterpiece, there are ways and tactics to better harness the breath for holistic benefits.
Firstly, breathing into the nose brings a purification and detoxification process that happens as the air passes through the nostrils and towards the lungs.
The nostrils filter, warm, and humidify the air in a way that the mouth cannot.
At times, breathing through your mouth is necessary (increased physical activity, sinus issues), but consciously breathing through your nose will purify the air especially in very dry or cold environments.
It has also been proven that breathing through the nose will increase air flow to arteries, veins and nerves — increasing the overall oxygen update and circulation.
In breathwork, we teach that conscious breath will then move towards your stomach as your diaphragm contracts and the belly expands as your lungs fill with air.
It is a highly efficient way to breathe as it pulls down on the lungs creating negative pressure in the chest, resulting in air flowing into the maximum area of your lungs.
I often prompt the feeling of breathing into your stomach first, before allowing the breath to fill up into the lungs.
For a more mindful approach to your breath, hold this breath for up to eight seconds, allowing the heart rate to slow down.
This will help to calm the nervous system to reduce anxiety and stress, it also helps to put the body into deep relaxation.
On the release of your breath, focus on releasing your stomach first, allowing the exerting breath of carbon dioxide to travel up the body through the lungs, up the air passage, and release the full breath through the mouth.
It is nurturing for the body to also place the left hand on your heart or chest, and your right hand on your stomach.
Feeling the tactile flow of breath throughout your body.
Our breath is synonymous with life.
To be alive is to be breathing, so, when we can intentionally change the way we breathe, we change the way that we respond to life itself — and this can be incredibly powerful.
Whether it’s taking a deep breath to pause and take time out to respond, or to do a few cycles of breathing to ease anxiety, we’re able to change our internal states which leads to change in everything external to us.
Other benefits of breathwork include: deep relaxation, reduction in anxiety and stress, improved sleep, boosted immune system, increased energy, released trauma and trigger patterns, release of stuck emotions held in the body, rebalance of the nervous system, release of blockages of built-up body tension, as well as freedom from limiting beliefs and behaviours.
Remember to breathe.

Laura Roodhouse is the owner of Wellness by PP wellnessbypp.com

A fresh look for Park Orchards mural

AS PART OF the Park Orchards Recovery Wall project, as reported in February M&N Bulletin, the community, through Park Orchards Learning Centre’s Nature in Art group, has given Pauline Brooke’s village map a fresh coat of paint, and a mural depicting local flora and fauna.
The Diary spoke with members of the Nature in Art group about the project.
Terry Napier, the founder of the Nature in Art group, said their goal was to represent the nature of Park Orchards on the wall.
“Our main theme in Nature in Art is to remind people of the beauty of nature and what we are losing rapidly, so we hope the mural is going to be a constant reminder.
“We have had so much reaction to it including all the little kids from school coming home, and that’s been tremendous,” he said.
The idea was presented to the Nature in Art group via local “dabbler” and Nature in Art member Anne Gibson who was approached by the Park Orchards Lions Club when they decided to give Pauline Brooke’s map a touch-up.
“Trevor from the Lions Club said ‘we’re redoing the map which Pauline Brooke did years and years ago, do you want to do something on the rest of the wall?’.
“I just thought it would be a nice community project, get the Nature in Art students from the Community House involved.
“I thought we would depict the 100 Acres.
“All of that is pretty close to my heart, all the mess we’re making of our environment,” she said.
The mural took a little over three- and-a-half weeks to paint.
Anne and the group usually paint with watercolours, but for this project they had to use housepaint, which Anne explained was a challenge all on its own.
“I had to pick out a red, white, blue, green, yellow and black.
“Because they are not primary colours — because they are made up of other colours — mixing them was a real challenge.
“We had a bit of fun with this, some strange colours,” she said.
The Park Orchards Nature in Art group is the second biggest group of its kind outside the Botanical Gardens.
The addition of the animals to the town map breathe new life and new meaning into a long-standing town feature, and the mural’s message “tread lightly and care for country” is a fitting reminder we need to look after our environment, as well as our community.

Come and try: Nature in Art
Where: Park Orchards Learning Centre, 572 Park Road
When: Saturday, March 19, 9:30am–3:30pm
Info: Inspired by the Park Orchards mural, always wanted to try your hand at this great art form? This is a great opportunity to work with the wonderful Terry Napier. Be introduced to the world of botanical art using pencil and watercolour. In this intensive one day “Come and Try” workshop you will be guided in:
– An overview of botanical and natural history art
– Sketching and illustrating techniques
– Principles of composition
– Watercolour techniques, dry brush and wet on wet
This is particularly designed for people who wish to learn more about natural history art and who are interested in continuing in our term classes.
Cost of course includes notes and drawings to guide you. Bring your own pencils, sketch pad, however you will have access to our class set of brushes, paints and watercolour paper. Course cost: $100.
**To assist us in planning, we appreciate you enrolling 7 days prior to start date**
To book visit www.parkorchards.org.au
Pictured: Margaret Napier, Terry Napier, Deborah McNeil, Graham Pilley and Anne Gibson
Photo: James Poyner

Run Warrandyte: the tale of the trail

THAT INTERIM period where the cricket season is winding down and the footy season hasn’t quite started yet means only one thing for our local running community; it is time — once again — to lace up those runners and tackle the Run Warrandyte fun run.
This is the second year of the 21km course option, and the allure of a half-marathon and any excuse to run the picturesque riverside trial in Pound Bend saw me two-for-two with the 21km distance.
For those who do not know, the 5km–21km distances are one to four laps of a course that takes runners up Everard Drive and onto the Tank Track, before a sweeping downhill section to the walking track, then the hard slog up to Third Street, before following West End Road back down to the Sports Pavilion and the start/ finish.
With its placement at the beginning of March, often bushfires, dehydration, and snakes are your biggest worry.
But, the recent, unusual weather and the brief soaking the township received the previous day, the course and conditions were cool and damp, making for some fast single trail through the lush, green forest alongside a flowing Yarra River.
Four laps of this course has you out there for a long time, but starting first and finishing after all the other distances had been completed meant I managed to see most of the other distance runners out on the course.
From 5km to 21km, young kids to seasoned recreational runners, everyone was smiling and just enjoying being out in Warrandyte’s bush environment.
Hats off to the community of volunteers who gave up a sleep-in on a Sunday morning to guide and cheer the runners around the course.
With a little over 100 metres of elevation per lap, the 21km event accumulates between 400 and 450 metres (depending on your smartwatch) of elevation over the four laps, which makes this course fun but challenging at any distance.
The atmosphere around the event village was electric, and kudos to the organisers who have designed a course where the buzz of onlookers and the activities in the event village invigorates and motivates you to go another lap.
I can say with certainty that the Run Warrandyte fun run has matured into an excellent community event, and I am looking forward to taking on its challenging hills and trails in 2023.
I hope they don’t add any more laps; I might not be able to help myself.

For all of this year’s results visit: https://www.runwarrandyte.com/

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March 2022

Welcome to March 2022’s Warrandyte Diary

To read the Diary online click the Flowpaper below:

To download your copy for reading offline, click here!