Sport

Warrandyte’s mighty hat trick

WARRANDYTE Cricket Club has experienced another successful year, taking home three senior premierships in the Ringwood District Cricket Association for 2015/16.

Victories for Warrandyte’s Third XI (Don Smith Shield), Fifth XI (Timothy Court Shield) and Sixth XI ensured the Bloods added more silverware to their recently bulging trophy cabinet.

It was a busy finals campaign for Warrandyte across the entire club with five of the six senior teams qualifying for the finals and all of those five winning through past the first week.

The impressive Third XI made it to the big dance the hard way. Arguably deserving to finish on top of the ladder, Warrandyte had to settle for third place and an elimination final against Lilydale due to an anomaly in the draw and a last round defeat.

Warrandyte made light work of the opposition in the knockout game, easily defending a monstrous 305 on the second day. Warrandyte reached the total thanks to the well-poised batting of Tom Ellis and Cameron Day, before Stuart Howarth and Shaun Ison brought the team home strongly.

Ison would prove to be the games X-factor, taking three wickets when Warrandyte had its turn with the ball, to compliment U16 player Ben Jackson’s four wickets.

The following week, Warrandyte faced Kilsyth to book its ticket into the Grand Final in what proved to be a tighter contest. After being restricted to 151 on a slow ground, (with Day doing most of the heavy lifting with the bat) Warrandyte’s skipper Stewart Smead delivered with the ball, taking 5/10 in a romp to ensure Warrandyte would play another week. Playing as the only senior team in the third week of the finals, Warrandyte had a large crowd in attendance as it took on the competitive East field at a neutral ground. The Grand Final was an intense affair and became a one-day fixture following rain interruption on the first day.

Warrandyte had 35 overs to play with and restricted Eastfield to 117, largely due to more terrific bowling from Smead. That left Warrandyte facing a tricky run chase in a high-pressure situation, and the Bloods needed to keep their heads. Consistent wickets kept East field in the game, until Chris Jackson and Dean Gidley combined for the ninth wicket to guide Warrandyte home to an unlikely victory.

The Fifth XI also welcomed 11 premiership players to the history books, with an emphatic Grand Final victory over Templeton at the Warrandyte Cricket Ground.

To reach the final, Warrandyte was required to chase down 100 against a tough Montrose team, but completed the turnaround thanks to some dogged batting by Peter Hanson. Warrandyte put on a nervous display with the bat in the Grand Final, which may have been influenced by the size of the occasion. The home side managed 125, with Nathan Croft providing a mature captain’s innings before Warrandyte took the ball to defend the total.

Thanks to clutch bowling by Aaron Dean and Ryley Reardon, Warrandyte pegged back Templeton, despite the away side needing just 40 runs with seven wickets in hand. Warrandyte was able to celebrate a truly incredible come-from-behind win because of a complete team effort.

The Sixth XI have also done the community proud with comprehensive victories over Olinda and then Eastfield in their finals campaign. In the first matchup, Warrandyte cruised to victory following a strong batting display from Travis Jackson and Bailey Thomas, with bowlers providing ample cover to defend 269. Bill Stubbs was the one to do the damage, with strong support from Brady Poole, Claire O’Brien and Max Coutts. Heading into the Grand Final, Warrandyte faced tough competition, highlighted when Eastfield put on 171 in its innings.

Stubbs and Andrew Thomas worked hard with the ball to ensure Warrandyte would have a strong chance of reaching the Eastfield score.

However, the total would turn out to be nowhere near defendable, with Graham Rees, Bailey Thomas and Brady Poole providing strong support to club president Greg Warren, who was the star of the show.

Warren would finish not out on 90 runs, an incredible effort by the club stalwart to ensure a team compromised of a mix of veterans, junior and seniors would take home the flag.

In the other grades, despite a first round win for the First XI and 13 wickets from coach Jake Sherriff in the finals, Warrandyte’s senior side would suffer a poor batting collapse in its preliminary final against North Ringwood.

Warrandyte’s Fourth XI would also be knocked out on the penultimate weekend of the year, with another batting collapse costing the team. The week before, five wickets from John Prangley and strong batting from Hoiberg and Goddard would guide them past South Warrandyte.

First XI

Elimination Final: Warrandyte 136 (Dehmel 39) d. Warranwood 117 (Sherriff 8/41). Preliminary Final: Warrandyte 74 (Dehmel 28) def. by North Ringwood 6/83 (Sherriff 5/25)

Third XI

Elimination Final: Warrandyte

9/305 (Ellis 69, Day 57, Haworth 41) d. Lilydale 165 (B Jackson 4/41, Ison 3/24). Preliminary Final 151 (Day 86) d. Kilsyth 49 (Smead 5/10, C Jackson 3/14). Grand Final: Warrandyte 8/118 (Ellis 18) d. Eastfield 7/117 (Smead 4/15)

Fourth XI

Elimination Final: Warrandyte 176 (Hoiberg 97 not out, Goddard 41) d. South Warrandyte 153 (Prangley 5/31). Preliminary Final: Warrandyte 64 (Kline 15) lost to Wonga Park 8/167 (Weatherley 2/4)

Fifth XI

Semi Final: Warrandyte 8/102 (Hanson 32) d. Montrose 100 (Woodhead 3/25). Grand Final: Warrandyte 125 (Croft 31) d. Templeton 115 (Dean 4/15, Reardon 3/10)

Sixth XI

Semi Final: Warrandyte 4/269 (Jackson 62, B Thomas 58) d. Olinda 83 (Stubbs 3/16). Grand Final: Warrandyte 2/176 (Warren 90 not out) d. Eastfield 171 (Stubbs 4/20, A Thomas 3/22)

Community gets a jog on

WARRANDYTE Reserve was awash with cones, colour and competition yesterday as runners of all ages and abilities took part in the fifth annual Run Warrandyte event.

Record numbers were recorded as runners competed across the six events. Everyone from parents in prams, school kids, Warrandyte Bloods players and dedicated athletes like the Westerfoldians parkarun group took part. Five-kilometre runner Simon Tu, a member of the parkarun group, believes running truly is a sport for those of all abilities.

“No matter quickly or slowly you run, everyone is going at full capacity. So it’s the most democratic sport there is,” said Simon.

Most exciting was the introduction and running of the inaugural Grand Hotel Warrandyte Gift. After a series of heats involving over 30 competitors, it was Rory Ashton who won out in a photo finish, crossing the line milliseconds ahead of Sharlotte Rimelowe and Kellie Appleby.

The first three placing’s received cash prizes courtesy of the Grand Hotel, ensuring the hard work of runners was rewarded.run3

Long distance runner Stephen Rennick was the star of the show in the Ringwood Warrandyte Osteopath 15km event, leading the field with an exceptional time of 55 minutes 40 seconds, beating out all comers, including a brave runner who finished the track barefooted while drumming along to music. Not to be outdone was Wendy Mountford, who clocked a rapid time of 1 hour 7 minutes and 14 seconds in an outstanding effort in the 15km female event, just beating out Clare Oliveira who came in a minute later.
Simon Bull and Jennifer Wood took out the Harding’s Swift Caravan Services 10km honours respectively, while Simon Tu and Alicia Callahan were the winners
in the Ruby Tuesday Jewellery 5km category.

Perhaps the most hotly contested was the Quinton’s SUPA IGA 2.2 kilometre run, in which youngsters led the way, treating the race like a sprint early before pushing each other all the way to the line.run4

The U8s Crystal Brook Tourist Park Oval Dash was also a crowd favourite, with the little ones running as fast as anyone in front of excited spectators. All events were eagerly supported and watched by a crowd of friends, family and volunteers who cheered each runner over the finish line.

Community favourites were present, such as Grand Hotel manager Peter Appleby, who put the running shoes on with son Liam, to represent the pub, sponsor for the 2016 gift event. Member for Warrandyte Ryan Smith was present to award medals to the winners and announce the raffle, and the Warrandyte football players also completed various circuits, despite playing a game the previous day. Participation was strong and impressive MC Steve Ballard was extremely satisfied with the day as a whole.run2

“It’s been fantastic, probably better than ever,” Steve said.

“We had really strong numbers, the weather was perfect and that really helped.

“It was nice and overcast for the distance runners, and then the sun came out for the Gift. Our sponsors have been really good, there was really good spirit and camaraderie between runners, and we saw some really good times especially in the distance runs.”

Plans are already underway to make the day even bigger in 2017, including more involvement with the local sports clubs.

“It’s a great way to kick off the junior and senior footy season and the netball season, it’s great to
see competitors from the different clubs in all the races,” Steve said.

“Next year what we’d like to do is try to set something up to get the sporting clubs to compete as clubs in the races, set them up against each other.”

Special thanks are in order for major organisers, including David Dyason who worked tirelessly along with all the volunteers, the White Owl Cafe who provided exceptional food and coffee for runners and spectators, and, of course, the Warrandyte Community Bank.

 

 

 

Grand Gift is all set

RUN Warrandyte’s 2016 event is going to even greater lengths to include and entertain the entire community, premiering the Grand Hotel Warrandyte Gift, a handicapped sprint race which joins other existing events to further bolster the day.

Offering a cash prize, the Gift will be run on the main oval as runners from longer distance events finish their races, allowing spectators to witness an exciting quick sprint event not previously offered on the day.

Sponsored by the Grand Hotel, the Gift is offering a prize of $600 dollars to be split between the three podium places, to give runners a little incentive before taking off. The day (Sunday March 6) kicks off with the 15km run at 8am sharp, followed by the 10km, 5km, and two point 2km events shortly after. The U8s have centre stage next, before heats start for the inaugural gift at 9am.

The day can’t be run without volunteers and those who are interested need only register online. This year the road events have been altered, with a section of rough added to the now famous Run by the River. The familiar 2.2km run/walk event now only contains one lap of the Second Avenue loop, but has runners doing more on the main oval. All other tracks have been changed slightly, and include the Pound Bend Tank, all starting and finishing on the main oval. All participants who register online will receive a Run Warrandyte running singlet as part of their entry fee and money raised will aid local sporting clubs – Warrandyte Junior Football Club, Warrandyte Football Club, Warrandyte Netball Club and Warrandyte Cricket Club. Visit warrandytesports.com.au

 

 

 

 

 

 

State call ups for our boys

WHEN Basketball Victoria is identifying players from your side for state selection camps, it’s a good indicator your program is in good shape.

In the past year, numerous players from Warrandyte Basketball have attended camps and tryouts in the hope of selection for state programs and teams.

In the 2014-2015 season, two Warrandyte affiliates represented Vic Metro; Under 16 player Casey DeWacht made the Under 16 Vic Metro Men’s side and coach Nicole Howard was head coach of the Under 14 Southern Cross Challenge Vic Metro Girls team.

This list has continued to grow in recent weeks with announcements for the 2015-2016 season. Young guns Emma Dowling and Alan Ure from the Under 14 Warrandyte Venom program have earned places in the Southern Cross Challenge (SCC) Vic Metro sides, while Nicole Howard will retain her head coach role at the SCC.

The SCC involves four days of competition and will take place in January at the State Basketball Centre, where Emma, Alan and Nicole will represent Vic Metro against Vic Country and other state sides.

Further selections include Warrandyte Venom Under 18 junior Fraser Trenfield, who will don the navy singlet for the Ivor Burge Vic Metro Men’s side, and Ryan Holloway, who joins the side in an assistant coaching capacity. Both Ryan and Fraser will travel to Queensland in February to compete in their national competition and will be able to use lead up games and tournaments to prepare. The Under 18 Vic Metro teams selections are also underway, with squads being whittled down to low numbers. Casey DeWacht (Venom Big V player) has reached the top 24 players for the 18 Men’s and will travel to NSW to compete in the East Coast Challenge in early January.

Joining him in NSW will be WBA director of coaching Nicole Howard, in an assistant coaching role for the Under 18 women’s side. The Under 18 national competition will take place in Adelaide in April, which Casey will be eligible to compete in if he earns final selection for the state side.

With a strong pathway now from Aussie Hoops all the way to Big V basketball, Warrandyte Basketball is helping to develop the skills of young players and coaches, who are able to represent Victoria Metro with pride.

To hell and back

RECOVERING from a long-term injury is a brutal physical process, something Melbourne AFL player Christian Petracca can certainly testify to. The second pick in the 2015 draft saw his dream of an AFL debut shattered after a season-ending ACL injury in pre-season training. But the 19-year-old Warrandytian insists the mental struggle was more difficult than the physical one, though he is winning the battle. Dealing with the reality of waiting another year to step onto the field, as well as the pressure of being a high draft pick, took its toll on the explosive midfielder. But according to Petracca, some tough love at home, a trip to America and learning some hard lessons along the way helped pave the way to his recovery. The Diary’s MICHAEL DI PETTA takes time out in the young gun’s home town for an update.

Michael: First of all, obviously with the ACL injury, you missed the entire year. As a young player, how do you come back from that?

Christian: Yeah, when I first did it, it was pretty frustrating, obviously I’d never had a setback like this in my life as a footballer, or a sportsperson in general. I didn’t really know how to cope or how to handle the situation, especially being touted as a high draft pick, when the pressure’s already on me. I think the biggest thing I did was to surround myself with good people. My family was supportive throughout the whole year and obviously so was everyone down at the footy club. You’ve got 44 blokes on a list and it really helps; any day if you’re feeling flat, you can talk to any of them.

MD: What was some of the best advice you got from some of the blokes at Melbourne or from the family?

CP: Make the most of it, you’re only in the gym for a year, so really try and harness the experience and get your body right. Also, they told me it’s probably the best time to do a knee, if you were to do one, right at the start of your career, so really just focus on working hard and being a better person.

MD: And the family?

CP: They’ve done everything, I get home, they’ve probably seen I’ve had a bad day and they give a lot of sup- port. My brothers haven’t changed and that’s probably the best thing, they’ve kept on telling me to suck it up. I don’t want them to change just because I’ve done a knee, or become an AFL footballer or anything, but it’s good because we haven’t changed at all. Mum and Dad have been really good the whole year, even off the field, just helping me through and it’s what I needed.

MD: What were some of the things you did, or techniques you used to keep yourself physically and emotionally motivated throughout the period?

CP: It was quite a boring year, I guess, because every day I did the exact same stuff – there was no real change, it was just basically leg strength. Every day, Monday, Wednesday and Friday would be my main days for running, gym and we did these other little exercises with that which would basically take up the whole day. And on Tuesday and Thursdays, which were my days off, I’d still be doing a bike session, or a swim to keep the cardio going. Then on top of that, you’ve got to fit in the meetings with the main group and all the game style reviews, and reviews from training. So you’re pretty busy; it’s a full time job. I’m probably more mentally fatigued then physically, just because it really has been a long year. I just can’t wait to start.

MD: When you were sitting out on the sidelines you must of learnt a lot about playing and being in the AFL, even though you weren’t out on the field.

CP: Yeah definitely, I think the biggest thing that I found was that talent only gets you so far, you could have another one of these injuries and your career might be over. It’s a really cutthroat industry and one minute you could be pick No.1 and the next minute you could be delisted. You’ve just got to work hard and earn respect, and that’s the biggest thing that I found. At the start of my career, I thought I’d rather be liked, but it’s more about working hard and earning respect from your teammates.

MD: You went to the US recently to take part in a rehabilitation program, what kind of different stuff were you doing over there?

CP: I was actually surprised, it was quite similar stuff, but Billy Knowles, the ACL specialist, made things a lot more specific with the drills we were doing. It was a lot of hard work, it was two two-hour sessions a day for five days, it would be all legs, a lot of gym, and a lot of focusing on landing, jumping and controlling. Obviously he knows a lot of statistics and he was telling me a lot of ACLs are done when you are decelerating, so not when you’re speeding up, but when you are slowing down. That’s how I did my knee, so we were focusing a lot on how to plant your feet or when you’re jumping and you get hit in the air, learning how to land properly. It was really good, it gave me a really good insight and I’ve come back from Philadelphia really confident in my knee. Mentally it was really weird: he sort of connected the wires from my mind to my leg, he made me think while I’m up in the air, this is how I’m going to land. I didn’t really know how to do that kind of thing, but now that I’ve gone there it really gave me a good insight on how to do it.

MD: So do you feel like your knee is back to 100%?

CP: I don’t think it will ever be back to 100%, I still have deficiencies in some areas, but I’ve spoken to a lot of boys and they’ve said similar things – not every ACL is the same. But at the moment it feels really good and I’m doing everything I can, and when we get to Day 1 of pre-season, I’m sure I’ll be able to do a lot, probably not the contact work, but I’ll probably build into it.

MD: Explosiveness was one of the words used to describe you coming into the draft. Do you feel you will have to modify your game in any way to still have the same impact?

CP: Not at all, I’ve always been quite an explosive player. The most frustrating thing about the injury was that I did it while I was moving. With my strength being agility, playing a lot of basketball, it really frustrated me because I’ve probably done that action so many times on the field, but I don’t think it will change my game in any way. I’ll still be the same player.

MD: Melbourne showed some really positive signs. Didn’t win too many games, but there were some really good signs from young blokes like Hogan and Brayshaw. With you coming back, how strong is the foundation for the footy club over the next few years?

CP: We’ve shown this year – well it’s been a bit inconsistent with the wins on the board – but we definitely have improved and we’ve got a really good base of young guys who have really helped us.

It’s really good going to a club every day knowing there are young guys around your age who are really there for one reason – to win premierships. It’s a really good feeling to know we definitely have the group to do that in the future.

MD: So, what’s your personal goal for the season ahead? What do you want to accomplish?

CP: I have some goals that I like to set, but for now it’s really just getting through pre-season unscathed. If I play Round 1, I do, if I don’t it’s really just focusing on playing some games this year. Pre-season this year is shorter, the NAB Cup starts in early Feb, but for me I think if I can get through Christmas I’ll be on the home straight.