Sport

All Bodi’s well for our BMX future

BMX began during the early 1970s in the United States when children began racing their bicycles on dirt tracks in southern California. Like skateboarding, surfing, snowboarding and Jack Daniels, the Aussies waited for the Americans to mature, tweak and be the general crash test dummies before embracing a new culture in 1975 (even then us southerners let the Queenslanders give it a crack before taking it on).

The year 1985 saw the soil get turned for the Park Orchards BMX track. In true Green Wedge fashion the council decided to reduce, reuse and recycle by building on the old tip. This must have been very handy when a tire was popped, a quick dig of a hole and surely an old tire would’ve been found?

Thirty years later the Park Orchards BMX club has continued to prosper and it has been an exciting year with a large influx of new members joining our existing members to speed their way around the track every second Saturday afternoon for club racing.

Recently the club was very excited to announce the beginning of major refurbishments to the track. Tireless work by the committee led to the securing of a HUGE grant by everybody’s favorite Warrandyte bank, the Warrandyte Community Bank (branch of Bendigo Bank). Manningham council has also jumped on board the reinvigoration train which will see the installation of lights and the asphalting of the berms. This will bring the track up the national standard, allowing our riders to go faster (and safer) and be able to see at night (also safer).

Following on from an exciting Olympic campaign by our Aussie riders in Rio, the club hosted a “Come and Try” day in early September that saw 28 new riders come and try BMX for the first time. Rio Olympian, Bodi Turner, donated his time and expertise on the day to coach our “come and triers”. The club has since convinced Bodi into running coaching sessions every Saturday until the end of the year.

Due to some crappy wisdom that claims “with good must come some bad” the club’s bubble deflated a bit two weeks ago when the clubrooms were broken into. The dastardly thieves took off with four racing bikes. With their energy obviously waning they also rode off into the metaphorical sunset with the canteen’s supply of Mars Bars, Gatorade and Coke.

The Warrandyte community spirit was brought to the fore yet again when in response to people wanting to donate money, a Go Fund Me page was set up. The money that has been donated will enable the club to purchase some new bikes (maybe even a couple of Mars Bars). For that the club says thank you.

Under 15’s bag flag

Warrandyte Junior Football Club experienced an emotional day at Victoria Park in Kew last month with one out of two teams tasting victory in their respective Grand Finals.

The U15s side put on a masterclass to defeat Macleod comfortably by 44 points, but the U14s were left heart- broken after falling to Banyule by a solitary point in the final minute.

A hefty crowd of red and white were present to watch the young Bloods go into battle, kicked off by the Under 14s side.

Warrandyte got off to the best possible start, kicking a goal within 10 seconds of the first bounce. Slightly scrappy play ensued from then on, but the Bloods were able to hold steady and take a seven-point lead into the first change.

Banyule was sharper throughout the second term, but the Bloods found some spark with a high mark and goal to star player Chase Wallace. Brady Poole kicked a much needed steadier right before half- time to keep Warrandyte close, trailing by just a point.

Whatever was said at halftime to the Warrandyte forwards obviously had effect, because the Bloods rattled off two quick re goals right after the long break to regain control of the game.

Wallace continued to put on a show and Warrandyte looked in the box seat with a 15-point lead going into the final term.

What followed was one of the most frantic quarters of football of the season.

Banyule hit back to draw the margin to within a goal with just six minutes to play, before eventually wrestling the lead back with just three minutes on the clock. Warrandyte was unable to muster a clearcut chance and despite playing a terrific game fell agonizingly close, losing 9.8.62 to 10.3.63.

Thankfully for Bloods fans, the Under 15s side was able to record a terrific victory in their Grand Final to bring home silverware for the club.

Jack Boyd was the star of the show kicking five goals to lead the attack. Boyd was ably supported by Leo Garrick in the middle, while Lachie O’Reilly and Sam Martini were defensively sound and hard at it when it counted.

Most impressive was the professionalism and brilliant mental performance from the outfit, keeping their cool throughout in the 12.11.83 to 6.3.39 victory.

“We trained well, we kept our emotions in check, we didn’t get ahead of ourselves. We had some assistance from the Colts during the week, we understood how they (Macleod) play and we executed perfectly,” coach Eugene Hansen told the Diary. The Bloods broke Macleod down by the 15-minute mark of the rst term and from then on continued to put in a full four-quarter performance. All players were contributors, some kicked flashy goals, while others performed crucial one percenters to ensure Warrandyte was out on top when the siren sounded.

“Everyone had an equal opportunity and everyone contributed, and some of the boys probably played 15-20 percent above their usual level. Typical of that was probably Thomas Mckenzie who kicked a goal up forward, he’s not renowned for kicking goals and the celebration after that was amazing,” Hansen said.

Equally as impressive was the turnout from the Warrandyte faithful to support both sides, with Hansen noting a historical significance to the crowd that others may have missed.

“It was fantastic to see life members from the footy club there, I think around 30 years ago I was involved with winning a flag at the same age group and maybe eight or nine of that premiership side came down to watch,” Hansen said.

For both sides, making the final alone was a tremendous achievement and it seems Warrandyte Football Club has some stars in the making over the coming years.

Warrandyte junior footy teams chase flags

LOCALS are urged to put a few hours aside this Sunday to lend their support to two Warrandyte Junior Football Club teams who have made it through to the grand final in the Yarra Junior Football League.

The two teams are the Under 14s (above, celebrating a recent victory) and the Under 15s (below), who both will play at Victoria Park Lower at 12.30pm and 2.45pm respectively, which means the Red & White army of supporters can set up camp at the one venue and watch the two Grand Finals in a row.

Both teams have not only made the big dance, but are red-hot favourites and had the luxury of a weekend off after smashing victories last Sunday week.

The U15s finished their year second on the ladder with an impressive nine wins from 14 matches. They came into their semi final full of confidence after winning their last three matches of the season.

In the first week of the finals the Bloods travelled to Bundoora, who finished on top of the ladder, only losing four matches all year. Our boys dished out an impressive performance and gave the home team a lesson as they smashed Bundoora 14.14.98 d 5.4.34. The win meant the U15s could progress straight to the Grand Final and have a week off.

bloods 15s

Eugene Hanson, coach of the U15s, spoke passionately about how the boys were ready to go and had the potential (playing at their best) to win the Grand Final but had to learn to control their emotions.

“I told them don’t think about the game itself, it’s very important to make the build-up as normal as possible,” he said.

“We have been training to manage and help the players understand the emotions coming into the game. The boys lost a grand final in the U10s competition five years ago and some of them have a fear of losing, so we want to make sure their emotions don’t get the better of them.”

The U15 boys will go into the Grand Final clear favourites as they do battle with Macleod at Victoria Park Lower in Kew at 2.45pm this Sunday (August 28). The good news is our Bloods have beaten Macleod twice throughout the season by comfortable margins. A flag is looking good.

On the same day the U15s rocketed into the grand final, shortly after the U14s followed suit, giving Doncaster no chance of even a sniff of victory as they ran over them 13.5.83 to 5.12.42.

The U14 team’s road to the finals was solid as they finished the regular season on top of the ladder, winning 11 of their possible 15 games, including only one loss in the last 11 (to Preston who was bundled out last week). What made the U14s semi final win even more impressive was that Doncaster finished second, also on 11 wins, with only percentage separating the two teams.

Warrandyte will battle it out with Banyule in the Grand Final after the Bears beat Doncaster in the preliminary final by one goal on Sunday.

U14s coach Andrew Wallace says he is very confident and reckons if the boys “stay strong and work as a team” and “keep their heads up until the final siren” they can pull off a win.

Warrandyte’s U14s will play Banyule at Victoria Park Lower, Kew, at 12.30pm this Sunday (the match before the U15s).

Both coaches and the rest of the WJFC urge Warrandytians to head down to the grand finals this Sunday and support our young Bloods as they hunt for flag glory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Junior Bloods’ flag tilt

Any fly on the wall at the Warrandyte Junior Football Club would be in for a real treat over the next few weeks.

With as many as five of the Bloods teams set to play in the Yarra Junior Football League finals, there’s going to be the full gamut of excitement, nerves and the pure adrenalin that comes from performing on the big stage. And, with a bit of luck, the euphoria that only a premiership victory can bring.

“It’s pretty exciting,” says Warrandyte Junior Football Club president Sarah Drew.

“As a club this is the best thing that can happen and we’re really happy for the boys.”

“The Colts [Under 16s] have been relegated into their comp with four losses and they had to make it up to get into finals. They’ve all been training hard and listening to their coaches, so it’s very exciting.”

Warrandyte has a junior side for each age division between Under 8s and Colts. As of recent competition rule changes, the Under 8s, Under 9s and Under 10s do not have official results or ladders.

Round 15 was played on Sunday to close out the home and away season before finals begin this Sunday.

With 11 wins from 15 matches, the Under 14s finished on top of the ladder to be the most successful Bloods team in the home and away season while the Under 11s ended up in second position with 10 wins and a draw from 15 games.

The Under 13s and Under 15s have also booked finals tickets. The Under 13s finished third on the ladder with nine wins for the season, while the Under 15s had a thumping 104-point victory in the last round to finish second and claim the double chance. The Under 12s had a solid year but finished eighth. The Colts scraped into the four and play finals Sunday.

The senior club will support the juniors this weekend. WFC president Peter Hookey says the senior players are excited at the prospect of inspiring the young Bloods through their finals campaign.

“We’ve sent a couple for seniors down to the Colts and Under 15 training to give a bit of leadership and education,” says Hookey. “We’re hoping they’ll see the professionalism that’s expected at a senior level and the desire to improve their football skills.”

Should kids lift weights?

YEARS ago, a video emerged showing Tiger Woods driving a golf ball like a pro. The only catch: he was just two years old at the time.

The message to parents: if you want your kids to excel in sports, you need to start them young. Of course, beyond developing specific skills—such as throwing, kicking, and swinging—improving strength, power and speed are key components of sports performance training. Which leads many parents to wonder, should my child lift weights? Some experts warn weight training at a young age can damage a child’s growth plates. And that concern has merit. There are dangers to growth plates found at the end of long bones.

The issue is, however, these injuries are almost always the result of using too much weight with the wrong technique. Smart strength training is absolutely acceptable as long as the right exercises are chosen and that the youth has an appropriate level of base strength and mobility.

Exposure to sports and fitness-based games is the best approach for younger kids. But as they reach Year 5 and 6 and high school age, you can start implementing more of a structured approach to strength training.

But we need to proceed with caution. People put too much focus on popular exercises like the bench press and start piling on weight even before a child can do 10 good push ups. Before a kid ever touches a weight, make sure he or she can perform basic body-weight exercises with perfect form.

As mentioned, push ups are a great start, pull ups, overhead squats, dips and lunges are others that can be put into perfect practice.

Two pairs of metal dumbbells on the floor used by young sportswoman

FIVE RULES FOR KIDS:

  1. Master the basics first. Work on the two movements above – the push up and overhead squat – until they can be completed correctly. (Check YouTube for video help)
  2. Focus on compound, multi-joint movements. Choose exercises that emphasize the upper back, core and hips. Less benching, more rowing. Smart exercises to include: stability-ball leg curls, inverted rows and reverse flys with light dumbbells.
  3. Stay away from most machines. Many gym machines – such as the leg extension, leg press and chest fly (pec deck) – force kids to work through unnatural movement pat- terns that have little carry over to sports and activities of daily living. (Cable machines are the exception).
  4. Watch the weights. Poor form and excessive loading are the reasons kids wind up injured. Once they’ve mastered their own body weight, start with a resistance that allows for 12 to 15 repetitions with perfect technique. Just one or two sets per exercise is fine initially, working up to a maximum of three once strength and endurance improve. Be sure not to take any sets to the point of muscular failure.
  5. Use a variety of strengthening equipment. Medicine balls, bands, and cable-based machines allow for three-dimensional movement. These are ideal because they offer kids variety, while training balance and stability just like free weights.

If your kids are keen to improve their skills and strength, improve their performance on the netball court or football ground, get them started correctly with some perfect- ly performed strength and functionality training exercises.