Sport

Tennis hot shots at Rod Laver Arena

Four groups of young tennis players from the ANZ Tennis Hot Shots program took over both Rod Laver Arena and Margaret Court Arena last Thursday as Tennis Australia renamed Australia Day the “Tennis Guru Day”.

Forty players aged seven to nine from Warrandyte Tennis Club, Warrandyte Primary School and Milgate Primary School participated in the Tennis Guru Hot Shots program on centre court.

The demonstrations highlighted some of the activities the young tennis players learn in the Hot Shots coaching program.

For half an hour the kids, aged between seven and nine years, demonstrated their skills to the crowd.

They were then followed by the professionals in their Australian Open matches.

While the kids strutted their stuff, coach Craig Haslam was interviewed by Tennis Australia for big screen crosses at the change of ends.

“These kids ran onto a huge stadium and played the game of tennis completely independent of adult support for 30 minutes.

The demonstration was not rehearsed, it was just kids having the time of their life playing tennis. I was so proud of them,” said Mr Haslam.

He must have heard the words “they are so cute” at least a hundred times that morning.

The Hot Shots tennis program demonstrations are a regular feature of the Australian Open and other demonstrations took part on the other major courts throughout the Grand Slam.

On your marks Warrandyte

WITH only one month to go, volunteers were representing Run Warrandyte at the February Riverside Market last Saturday.

The annual event, which is now in its sixth year, grows in both event size and distances.

Now a regular event in Warrandyte on the March sporting calendar, this year’s Run Warrandyte has partnered with charity Stop, One Punch Can Kill (SOPCK) making this year’s event not only a celebration of fitness within the community but also a stand, or should I say sprint, against violence too.

“We are very excited to include SOPCK in our event this year,” said David Dyason of the Run Warrandyte Committee.

“We have introduced a team fundraising aspect to this year’s event with prizes being awarded to the team which raises the most money for the charity.”

The SOPCK charity was set up in the wake of the death of David Cassai, who was a killed on New Year’s Eve 2012.

Mr Cassai had ties to the local community as he attended Warrandyte High School and often watched the footy.

The Warrandyte footy club got behind the SOPCK campaign in the 2016 season.

As one-punch deaths become an increasing problem, sports clubs are often used as a conduit to engage young people in the Stop campaign, and with the sports club contributing to the management and facilities that Run Warrandyte uses, it seems fitting to have SOPCK as the event’s first official charity.

“People like the philosophy of running, but are often put off by the physical aspect.”

“I think having a fundraising part to the run will encourage people to sign up and get out on the course,” said John, a member of the Run Warrandyte team.

The course is similar to last year with one loop that brings runners back to the sports oval; run distances are determined by the number of laps they do.

The Run Warrandyte Committee will have the usual support of the local fireys, keeping everyone cool, as well as some on-course entertainment to keep everyone’s spirits up on that long climb up to The Pound.

The Grand Hotel Gift, a 100 metre, handicapped sprint is also back after last year’s successful integration into the running event.

While registration for the Gift alone is possible, participants in the 2.2K, 5K, 10K and 15K distances are encouraged to also enter the Gift as entry for these people is complimentary.

To help with training, Run Warrandyte local personal trainer Chris of RivvaPT has produced a training plan, which is available through the Run Warrandyte Facebook page, for the 5K and 10K distances.

“We have had a number of people ask us if we can walk any of the runs,” said Mr Dyason.

“Because we have to close public roads, if people want to only walk, we suggest they enter the 2.2 or 5K event.”

The Gift and the longer runs all start and finish on the oval, where a number of local clubs and businesses are expected to be on display, making it a great morning out for both runners and non-runners.

The run takes place on March 5.

Run Warrandyte registration can be found online and the Run Warrandyte team regularly posts updates and competitions on their Facebook page.

Warrandyte’s footy girls are ready to rumble

Next year is set to be ground breaking for women’s football Australia-wide, following the inception of the National Women’s competition.

Many community clubs are following suit, placing an emphasis on boosting and developing a culture of female football at their organisation.

Warrandyte Junior Football Club is no exception, looking to field a number of girls’ teams in 2017.

About 40 girls across all age groups attended the WJFC Girls’ footy open day at Warrandyte Re- serve on November 20.

Eugene Hanson, the WJFC Colts coach and a number of club leaders and Colts players ran training drills, which were completed with intense determination, despite very hot conditions.

The girls were extremely impressive and due to the growing nature of the code, WJFC is pleased to offer young girls in the community the chance to play organised football across a range of age groups.

If you are interested in being part of youth girls football at WJFC email secretary@warrandytejfc.org

Cricket resumes: hat-trick hero Steve

CRICKET has returned to Warrandyte for the 2016/17 season, but due to some bemusing league decisions and wet pitches, there have only been six results from a possible 20 games.

Despite a few sunny forecasts on Saturdays, the RDCA has elected to call two different rounds off across the league to ensure fair competition, with varying quality in grounds. On the positive side, Warrandyte’s seniors had only lost one game by October’s end.

In the available games, Warrandyte showed extremely promising signs. The First XI and Second XI both took victories in Round 1. For the First XI, Dave Mooney started off yet another season in fine nick, posting 47 not out to guide Warrandyte to a very defendable 170 at a slow Dorset Oval.

In doing so, Mooney became the highest all time First XI run scorer, setting another record in his golden career with the club.

South Croydon was under pressure from the start, with Daniel Barry and Alex McIntosh taking apart the batting lineup with three and two wickets respectively.

Warrandyte went on to win by 45 runs.

In Round 2, Warrandyte faced a tough task at home, chasing 351 after Templeton thrashed the bowling attack around the Warrandyte Cricket Ground. Warrandyte’s coach Jake Sherriff (6/76) was reliable with the ball on a tough day, taking late scalps to peg back the wickets before Warrandyte was saved by the rain.

The Second XI was also victorious in Round 1, recording a strong home victory against Warranwood. Dale Lander led from the top of the order with 62, while new skipper Campbell Holland slashed 47 to give his side an excellent start. Lander would be promoted to the First XI the following round and Warrandyte knocked out 207 before sending in the bowling attack.

The home side was able to dismiss the Warrandwood batsmen in quick order on a fast wicket, taking a 50- run victory thanks to tight bowling from Tom Ellis (3/10) and Campbell Holland (3/13).

In other results, Warrandyte’s Third XI thanked Tyson Brent and Josh Aitken for providing 264 in their first game of the year.

On a postal stamp ground against Montrose, Brent’s batting was exceptional considering it was his first knock of the season, giving the team good faith in their batting lineup.

The Fourth XI cruised to victory in its run chase against Heathmont Baptists, returning to the holy grail ground at Stintons Reserve.

Patient batting from Dave Molyneux and direct bowling from John Prangley and Daniel Woodhead made the difference.

The Fifth XI was unable to chase down Ainslie Park, despite some strong individual performances. Ben Sprout pegged back the Ainslie Park batsmen with a ve-wicket haul, effectively closing out the innings with late strikes to hold the batters to 207.

Stephen Grocott provided hope for Warrandyte with 41no, but they eventually fell 42 runs short.

Results:
First XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte 6/170 (Mooney 47 not out) d South Croydon 8/135 (D Barry 3/20, McIn- tosh 2/16). Round 2 – Warrandyte drew Templeton 8/351 (Sherriff 6/76)

Second XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte 6/207 (Lander 62, Holland 47) def. Warranwood 157 (T Ellis 3/10, Holland 3/13). Round Two – Warrandyte drew with North Ringwood.

Third XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with East Ringwood. Round 2 – Warrandyte 3/264 (Brent 106, Aitken 59 not out) d Montrose 135 (Smead 3/16, Ison 2/16). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with Norwood.

Fourth XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with Warranwood. Round 2 – Warrandyte 3/135 (Molyneux 60) d Heathmont Baptist 7/130 (Prang- ley 3/17, Woodhead 2/19). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with South Warrandyte.

Fifth XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with Croydon North. Round 2 – Warrandyte 165 (Grocott 41 not out, Jackson 32) d by Ainslie Park 7/207 (Sproat 5/34). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with Heathmont Baptist.

Sixth XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with North Ringwood. Round 2 – Warrandyte d by Heathmont Baptist (forfeit). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with North Ringwood.

All Bodi’s well for our BMX future

BMX began during the early 1970s in the United States when children began racing their bicycles on dirt tracks in southern California. Like skateboarding, surfing, snowboarding and Jack Daniels, the Aussies waited for the Americans to mature, tweak and be the general crash test dummies before embracing a new culture in 1975 (even then us southerners let the Queenslanders give it a crack before taking it on).

The year 1985 saw the soil get turned for the Park Orchards BMX track. In true Green Wedge fashion the council decided to reduce, reuse and recycle by building on the old tip. This must have been very handy when a tire was popped, a quick dig of a hole and surely an old tire would’ve been found?

Thirty years later the Park Orchards BMX club has continued to prosper and it has been an exciting year with a large influx of new members joining our existing members to speed their way around the track every second Saturday afternoon for club racing.

Recently the club was very excited to announce the beginning of major refurbishments to the track. Tireless work by the committee led to the securing of a HUGE grant by everybody’s favorite Warrandyte bank, the Warrandyte Community Bank (branch of Bendigo Bank). Manningham council has also jumped on board the reinvigoration train which will see the installation of lights and the asphalting of the berms. This will bring the track up the national standard, allowing our riders to go faster (and safer) and be able to see at night (also safer).

Following on from an exciting Olympic campaign by our Aussie riders in Rio, the club hosted a “Come and Try” day in early September that saw 28 new riders come and try BMX for the first time. Rio Olympian, Bodi Turner, donated his time and expertise on the day to coach our “come and triers”. The club has since convinced Bodi into running coaching sessions every Saturday until the end of the year.

Due to some crappy wisdom that claims “with good must come some bad” the club’s bubble deflated a bit two weeks ago when the clubrooms were broken into. The dastardly thieves took off with four racing bikes. With their energy obviously waning they also rode off into the metaphorical sunset with the canteen’s supply of Mars Bars, Gatorade and Coke.

The Warrandyte community spirit was brought to the fore yet again when in response to people wanting to donate money, a Go Fund Me page was set up. The money that has been donated will enable the club to purchase some new bikes (maybe even a couple of Mars Bars). For that the club says thank you.