Sport

Warrandyte at the Australian Open 2018

Joel’s ‘king of the kids’ at the Australian Open

By JOSH HUNTLY

WARRANDYTE Tennis Club coach Joel Compagnino has been kept on his toes during his third year of co-ordinating the ball-boys and girls at the Australian Open, managing over 350 children as the Grand Slam rolls into Melbourne for its 2018 edition.

Joel, who was a ball-boy himself at the 2001 Australian Open, has a total of six years’ experience under his belt working in different roles around the event prior to settling on his current task of assisting in the management of the ball-kids.

“It’s been a lot of fun,” says Joel.

“During the tournament, it’s all about marking them, making sure they stay hydrated and generally supervising them through the event.

“It involves getting on to the court and watching them in action day to day.

“It’s good to be involved with the kids, especially the ones that you know from coaching.

“It’s always good seeing them make friends as well,” Joel told the Diary.

It’s a busy time for the Warrandyte Coach, but he says working with others in the fifty-person management team who are as passionate about tennis and developing the youth of the green-ball game is a plus.

“It’s a really good atmosphere,” he says.

“We’re pretty like-minded and do the same things so it’s good to catch up every year.

“You’re predominantly watching the kids but you also get to watch a bit of tennis as well which is a lot of fun.”

For the ball-boys and girls that participate, the Australian Open will provide memories that last a lifetime and the chance to work with the greats of the game and witness their prowess firsthand is a highlight that won’t soon be forgotten.

“They definitely enjoy the experience,” says Joel.

“They like to rub shoulders with their idols, even just to be involved with the inner-sanctum of the tournament and to see a little of what the public doesn’t see as well as seeing their heroes walk down the corridors.

“I still get goose-bumps watching them, I can only imagine how the kids feel.”

As well as being involved with the kids during the tournament, Joel has a significant role in assessing the ball-kids for the next tournament and he says the criteria to qualify for a spot can be tough, but there’s always a sure-fire place to start.

“Firstly, they’ve got to know a little bit about tennis,” he joked.

“They’ve got to know how to score the game so they know which end the balls need to go.

“They would need to have a good roll and provide good service to the player, and their general speed around the court is important as well.”

The trial period, which occurs in March, is a hectic time for Joel and the other coaches as they attempt to grade 2000 prospects.

There is significant competition for spots as young tennis players from around the area and interstate, and in some cases overseas, vie for a spot amongst the 350 chosen during the June-July selection period.

In the meantime, however, Joel remains the “king of the kids”, overseeing the current generation of the Australian Open ball-boys and ball-girls.

 

 

Warrandyte Tennis Hot Shots all the rage at Australian Open 2018

By CRAIG HASLAM

Once again the Tennis Guru provided a once in a lifetime experience to 40 kids from the Hot Shots tennis programs at Warrandyte Tennis Club (WTC), Warrandyte Primary School and Milgate Primary School.

The kids were demonstrating their amazing tennis skills to the adoring fans (and of course their parents).

The 30 minute demonstration opens up play on the stadiums and the kids are followed on court by the professionals for their Australian Open matches.

Coaches Matt Neil & Angus McLellan represented WTC and helped the kids and parents throughout the morning.

Charlotte Petrella tossed the coin for Dylan Alcott’s match and Max Brogan tossed the coin for the legends featuring Henri Leconte.

The rest of the kids got to make a guard of honour so they could high-five the players as they came on court.

We also had five WTC Hot Shots competing in the inaugural Orange Ball and Green Ball challenge on Australia Day at the Australian Open.

The teams competed against other clubs from around Melbourne on the courts the pros play on. Certainly some amazing tennis action for the kids from WTC.

 

 

Warrandyte strong with the bat and ball


THE WARRANDYTE Cricket Club has had a much-improved November, allowing all squads to increase their standings heading into the final month of the year.

Report from the boundary: 1st XI

The 1st XI have put their first win on the board for the year in Round 5 against Montrose thanks to Ben Taylor, who scored back-to-back half centuries throughout the month, placing himself at the front of the runs sheet for the club.

Taylor, who led the way with 68, was supported well by the Poole brothers, with Brady (3/39) doing damage with the ball, while Darcy (28) assisted with the bat.

Despite a severe middle order collapse by the team, 161 runs was enough for Warrandyte, with Montrose bowled out in the final over to finish four runs short. Round 6 placed Warrandyte in a matchup against a top tier South Croydon, and a rain-affected tie gave Warrandyte the chance to take points off a strong team.

After a shortened day one, Warrandyte knew South Croydon would be declaring early and attempting to bowl them out by 7pm.

Warrandyte, facing a very strong bowling attack looked steady in both the run chase and time management, until some late wickets looked to dash the hopes of a tough draw.

However, 14-year-old Brady Poole would heroically face 57 deliveries and survived the entire final over with Warrandyte nine wickets down to earn the draw, and give Warrandyte what could be a golden four points come the end of the year.

Round 4: Warrandyte 127 (Taylor 52) def. by South Croydon 8/206 (Killey 4/25).

Round 5: Warrandyte 161 (Taylor 68) def. Montrose 157 (B Poole 3/39).

Round 6: Warrandyte 9/139 (Williams 50) drew with South Croydon 6/230 (White 3/36, Killey 3/79).

Report from the boundary: 2nd XI

The 2nd XI had an entertaining November, but unfortunately were unable to take a win from the three games.

Blooding some exciting youth in the team, including Bailey Bowyer, Ben Jackson and Chris Rakuscek, the team have been very competitive in all games, but unable to scrape together their second win for the season.

In their Round 5 game, Warrandyte would fall just 30 runs short despite a strong 62 by Lloyd Williams, a knock that would see him promoted to the 1st XI in coming weeks.

Ben Jackson’s trio of wickets earlier in the game also put the Bloods right into it.

In Round 6, Warrandyte had an almighty batting collapse until tail-ender Steve Lockie would top score and put on 30 odd with Steve Rock to give Warrandyte a total of 75 to defend with the ball.

Despite the small total, the impossible looked alive when South Croydon fell to be 5/50, until the total was eventually surpassed.

Round 4: Warrandyte 8/109 (S Bowyer 26, Lee 25) def. by South Croydon 3/113 (Lee 2/22).

Round 5: Warrandyte 172 (Williams 62) def. by Heathmont Baptists 8/204 (B Jackson 3/39).

Round 6: Warrandyte 75 def. by South Croydon 8/110 (Jackson 3/32)

Report from the boundary: 3rd XI

The 3rd XI sits just outside the top four in the Don Smith Shield, a respectable effort in such a competitive grade.

Warrandyte have put together a good couple of wins thanks to some reliable batting by captain Cameron Day and all-rounder Brandon Stafford, both really clicking with the bat and ball.

Having played away all season, it wasn’t until Round 6 that Warrandyte would play their first game at their new home at Warrandyte High School, and would fall just short of a very strong total posted by Scoresby.

Round 4: Warrandyte 8/141 (Day 44, Stafford 30) def. Scoresby 2/148.

Round 5: Warrandyte 8/228 (Day 93) def. Montrose 8/218 (Ison 3/48).

Round 6: Warrandyte 200 (Haworth 73) def. by Scoresby 268 (Huntly 4/81, Reardon 3/76).

Report from the boundary: 4th XI

The 4th XI sit third, with three wins and two losses for the season, but have a game up their sleeve as they head into December.

Skipper Nathan Croft has ensured they took points in November against St Andrews, helped by veteran all rounder Mick Spence, and a couple of forfeits by Scoresby.

Round 4: Warrandyte def. Scoresby via forfeit.

Round 5: St Andrews 88 (Spence 3/7) def. by Warrandyte 3/101 (Spence 28n.o.).

Round 6: Warrandyte def. Scoresby via forfeit.

Report from the boundary: 5th XI

The 5th XI are just two points shy of the top of the table in the John Macmillan Shield, benefiting from the leadership of their new co-captains.

Playing a mixture of seniors and juniors, the mixed format of cricket has become a real treat to watch.

Chris Jackson ensured the team would win their Round 4 game, with Drew El Moussali supporting well with the ball.

In their Round 6 game, Warrandyte dominated Ainslie Park, with Chris Jackson starting the party with the bat, before Sean Dixon put the opposition to sleep, monstering 100 off eleven overs to ensure the game would be Warrandyte’s (see below).

Round 4: Warrandyte 7/221 (C Jackson 52n.o., Molyneux 52n.o.) def. Ainslie Park 136 (C Jackson 4/23, El Moussali 2/6).

Round 5: Warrandyte 7/230 (Bansal 55n.o., Trayford 49n.o.) def. by Wantirna 242 (C Lawson 3/17, El Moussalli 3/20).

Round 6: Warrandyte 6/282 (C Jackson 53, S Dixon 100n.o.) def. Ainslie Park 9/266 (Hanson 3/9).

Report from the boundary: 6th XI

Bill Stubbs has his 6th XI working well together, sitting atop the ladder at the end of November.

Due to some kinks in the fixture, Warrandyte faced Bayswater Park three times in a row, with Warrandyte winning all games.

Despite the same opposition, Warrandyte were consistent and versatile through all three ties, with different batters and bowlers ensuring the side stayed perfect for the month.

Round 4: Warrandyte 4/127 (Dixon 34) def. Bayswater Park 122 (A Ramsdale 4/16).

Round 5: Warrandyte 5/145 (G Warren 51n.o.) def. Bayswater Park 5th XI 9/108 (Rees 3/20).

Round 6: Warrandyte 4/297 (T Jackson 101, J Stubbs 49) def. Bayswater Park 78 (B Stubbs 4/25, J Weatherley 3/4).

Blistering century

LOCAL Warrandyte cricketer Sean Dixon has made waves with an astounding knock, that will remain in the minds of fans and spectators for years to come.

Dixon, who has most recently been playing for the clubs veterans team in the Over 40’s squad, made his mark in the Seniors division as well, with a scorching 100 not out off just 39 balls.

The century, recorded against Ainslie Park in a 5th XI fixture on November 18, powered the club through to an impressive victory.

Dixon’s knock at Griff Hunt Reserve is even more remarkable when analysed; he had 14 dot balls, effectively meaning he made the 100 off just 25 deliveries.

Dixon arrived at the crease in the 17th over and was retired by the 28th, after hitting nine sixes and ten fours for his innings.

Students bowled over by veteran cricketers


Every year, members of the Over 60s Warrandyte cricket team volunteer their time at the two local primary schools to teach students some batting, bowling and fielding skills.

This year, Steve Pascoe, Barry Johnson, John Smith, Norm Darnfield and Ray Baird coached students in the Foundation, Grade 1 and Grade 2 classes at Warrandyte Primary School with a series of Milo cricket drills.

“The veteran cricketers are really entertaining and very enthusiastic about their sport,” said PE teacher Sally Freemantle.

“The students always love it when they visit — it’s a very popular event at school every year,” she said. Steve Pascoe has been involved as a player at Warrandyte Cricket Club since 1976.

He and his team of veterans also run the Milo cricket program at the club, and they’re always on the lookout for new recruits during their school visits. “Milo Cricket is a great initiative,” Ms. Freemantle added.

“It’s a terrific opportunity for children to learn basic ball skills and it’s a gentle introduction to a team sport. “Getting children involved in sports, especially team sports, is so important.

“There are some very important life skills to be learnt by being part of a sporting team, as well as the health and fitness benefits,” she said.

This year the Milo IN2CRICKET program begins at WCC on Friday November 3 at 6pm and is open to boys and girls aged 5–8. Sessions run for up to an hour, using plastic bats and rubber balls.

The program is also designed to be inclusive of children with disabilities. It runs every week through until March, except for the Christmas break.

Venom claim women’s basketball premiership flag


WARRANDYTE Venom’s Youth League One Women’s team crowned a terrific season in early September, winning the Grand Final over three thrilling games.

The Venom women defeated Coburg by five points at the Warrandyte Sports Complex in game three to take home the flag, giving co-captains Casey Taylor and Ellie Lock a fitting send off in their final games for the side.

Warrandyte went into the finals series on top of the ladder, after dropping just two games for the season, and had a week off heading into the Grand Final series, played as a best of three.

However, the week off may have done Warrandyte a disservice according to young gun Maddi Taylor, as Coburg were able to seize their chance, defeating them by 11 points.

“We’d beaten Coburg quite easily in both games during the season, and because we went straight to the grand final we had a week off.

“They didn’t, so they had a bit of momentum heading into that first finals game, and that caught us off guard a bit,” Taylor said.

In game two, Venom were a different force, and squared the ledger at 1–1 after a nine point win. Ellie Locke led the way with 22 points and six assists, aided by Maddi Taylor who scored 18 points, and Simone Caruana, who notched 13 points and grabbed 14 rebounds.

In the all-important deciding game, Warrandyte were too strong throughout the contest, surviving a final quarter scare to run out deserving 78–73 winners.

“We had the lead the whole game and we played really well, in the last quarter they came back a little bit, but we kept our composure and sealed the win in the end.

“I think Coburg actually finished fourth so they did really well to come out and have a crack like they did,” Taylor said.

Locke, Taylor and Caruana were again influential, along with Isabel Feller.

Locke threatened to triple double with ten points, seven assists and six rebounds, while Caruana continued her form on the glass, with 14 points and eight more boards.

Taylor and Feller took it upon themselves to carry the scoring load, dropping 17 points each to bolster the offence. Spearheaded by coach Angela Heigh, Warrandyte’s achievement and ultimate success owes a lot to hard work and a lengthy pre-season.

“Our pre-season started in October last year to try and prepare.

“We did a lot of training, won a pre-season tournament and it’s been a good season just from there,” Taylor said.

No season is complete without an awards night, and Warrandyte were the toast of the town on September 23, at the Big V Awards ceremony at Etihad Stadium.

Simone Caruana and Ellie Locke received a prestigious all-star starting five position, while Caruana was also crowned the league’s best defensive player.

All of the Venom players were invited on stage to accept the trophy, capping off a terrific campaign.

Preparation now begins for participation in the State Championship Women’s league, after promotion was earned in the 2017 season, while Warrandyte Basketball will hold their AGM on October 31.

New coach to give Bloods a fresh start for 2018

AFTER AN entertaining yet challenging 2017 season, the Warrandyte Football Club will head into the summer break with belief that 2018 can bear greater fruit.

Finishing the season in 11th place with three wins, it was decided the senior side needed to take a new direction despite avoiding relegation.

Senior head coach Peter Muscat departed after two seasons at the club, and the Bloods were quick to announce the new man for the job.

Anthony McGregor will be the man to lead Warrandyte into battle for 2018, bringing an impressive portfolio of playing and coaching experience to the position.

McGregor, formally chosen with pick 28 in the draft by Fitzroy, played alongside club greats such as Paul Roos and Alistair Lynch before injuries prevented him from relocating to Brisbane following the famous merger.

Following his playing days, McGregor took the position of head coach at Reservoir, and took a team on the brink of folding into a stable position.

McGregor then coached the Bundoora Football Club reserves, taking them to a grand final, while also assisting in the senior premiership.

With years of experience in the northern football system, McGregor now brings his talents into the EFL, and is excited to take charge.

“I’m really looking forward to it.

“I’ve met Pete Hookey (club president), he’s a fantastic fella and he’s got the club at heart.

“When you have someone at the top who loves it so much, when you’ve got people at the top who do care about the club, once that filters down good things really happen,” McGregor said.

McGregor believes that capitalising on the youth down at the club will be important, and hopes to craft a game plan the youngsters will get behind.

“There’s a great amount of youth, so I think that simplifying the game plan, getting a basic plan we can execute, simplifying rotations et cetera is the way to go.

“Looking from the sideline, I want to get the youngsters to enjoy it a bit more and with that will come success.

“When you start from scratch, to put a win/loss goal on it would be foolish.

“Maybe adding a few bigger bodies will make that turn around quicker, but I think it’s about getting that sense of camaraderie.

“There’s youth on this team who are going to be, hopefully, together for a few years, so the opportunity is there to mould and build a very competitive team,” McGregor said.

On the field, the Bloods played their final game of the season against Scoresby, and while the Seniors fell, the Reserves won a real arm-wrestle to cap off an admirable campaign.

However, the day took on greater significance, as Jake Bentley called time on his Bloods career.

A club stalwart and always a tough competitor, the value of Bentley’s leadership over the past few seasons cannot be underestimated and it’s no doubt he will be sorely missed.

Unfortunately, the senior side were unable to turn the tide after a slow start, remaining goalless to halftime.

Scoresby were able to control the tempo and ran out convincing 47-point winners, 9.15 69 to 3.4 22.

The result left Warrandyte 11th on the EFL ladder on 12 points, ten above East Burwood who finished the season winless.

The Reserves were able to earn a thoroughly deserved win in their season closer, holding off Scoresby to record a 13-point win, 5.7 37 to 3.6 24.

Finishing 6th on the ladder on 32 points after notching eight wins, the reserves were within touching distance of finals and can give themselves a pat on the back after a truly excellent season.

Footballers can now enjoy well deserved rest over the off-season, and gear up for a pre-season which promises much leading into season 2018.

Bullants blast Jets in Grand Final victory


In the U13/3 Netball competition, the Serpell Jets were the clear favourites, coming into the finals with a win/lose record of 10–1, compared to the Warrandyte Bullants 6–5.

However, the Bullants had been the victors in the Jets one and only loss of the season, giving the underdogs some needed confidence in the final.

The Jets started the game like the favourites with a 3–1 first quarter, which was repeated in the second quarter only because the Bullants snuck a goal on the half time siren.

It was looking bleak for Warrandyte Bullants at half time but by three quarter time they had the premiership within reach.

Aggressive defence by Scarlett Preston, a lot of hard work through the centre and around goal and accurate shooting from Amber Gedge saw the Bullants mount a solid third quarter comeback, entering the final quarter trailing 10–8.

Both teams fought with everything they had in the final quarter, setting the large crowd on edge.

The Bullants drew level with 90 seconds to go after a see-sawing nine minutes and with both teams playing so well, it was impossible to tell who would win.

The Bullants hit the front with 30 seconds left in the game but the Jets still had a chance to level the scores as they took the ball to the centre restart.

When the Bullants forced the turn over with only seconds left, their last goal proved to be the winner.

As the siren sounded, there were cheers and tears for both sides with the Warrandyte Bullants winning 14–13.

The winning team (Photo: SCOTT PODMORE)

Warrandyte ace their way to two premierships


THE WARRANDYTE Tennis Club get to hang two new premiership flags from their rafters after their open Section Five and Section Six teams won their grand finals last Friday night.

The Section Five side defeated Yan Yean Red 42 games to 22 and the Section Six team defeated Wattle Glen 35 games to 28, to win their respective finals in the Diamond Valley Tennis Association’s autumn season.

Both teams were forced to work hard early, they were neck-and-neck with their opponents when rain forced play to stop midway through the matchups.

The break turned out to be a blessing in disguise for Warrandyte, once play resumed both their teams came out firing and stormed home to victory.

Alistair Tudor, one of Warrandyte’s coaches and the Friday night Junior Convenor said it was great to see the dedication and hard work the players put in throughout the season pay off.

“[I’m] happy for both teams, given that both teams missed out on making their finals last season, it gives them great reward to be able to win both their finals this season.

“For Section Six who were on top of the ladder for the majority of the season it was great to close the season the same way whilst Section Five finishing third on the ladder and managed to knock off the second place team in the semis to progress to the grand final and take the flag,” he said.

Warrandyte’s Section Two and Section Three teams also qualified for the finals this season but were eliminated in the semis after losing to Plenty and Norris Bank respectively.

Even though not all of the teams finished the season as premiers, Coach Tudor believes it is still a huge positive for the club to have all four of their sides makes the finals.

“I think it’s great for tennis in Warrandyte,” he said.

He went on to reflect on the boost to the club’s reputation a result like this has.

“Anytime the club can have success it does great boosting the profile of the club within Warrandyte as well as the surrounding areas,” he said.

He also wanted to thank some special people who played an important role in the teams’ and club’s success. “In reality I couldn’t do my role without the support of the parents.

They are the vital part that makes sure players get to matches and [they] greatly assist me in making sure the competition runs smoothly,” he said.

The teams won’t have to wait long to take back to the court with the next season kicking off on July 21.

Congratulations to Section Six players: Callum Bowers, Hamish McLellan, Nick Davenport, Owen Kelly and Mitch Miskowiec-Robb and to Section Five players: Nicholas Tso, Matthew Quick, Daniel Mizzi(on the ground), Raymond Chen and Chris Milburn-Clark (not pictured) on a great season.

 

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Warrandyte women line up with Sheagles

WOMEN’s FOOTY is a big hit in Warrandyte and although the Bloods may not have a team in the Victoria Amateur Football Association (VAFA) Women’s Premier division, Warrandyte locals are making a big impact with four of our girls playing for the Marcellin Sheagles.

Nat and Zoe Macdonald, Lexie Hipwell and Taylor Padfield, all friends who have grown up together, made the decision to play women’s football this season and have reaped the rewards.

The Diary met with the girls, and Lexie told the Diary how the four of them ended up playing footy.

“My intent was never actually to play footy — I mean I wanted to, but Dad was a bit worried, and I didn’t want to do it by myself.

“But Nat got me into it,” she said.

Nat acted as somewhat of a ringleader for the group, and Marcellin can be thankful that she did.

In Lexie, the Sheagles gained athleticism, a strong presence in the ruck and long kicking ability.

Zoe’s strengths lie in the backline, with a good ability to mark and win the ball at ground level, while Nat acts as a speedster in the middle and excels at clearing packs.

“My friend Maggie was asking me to come down and play for the Marcellin Seniors, she said that it was a new team with some good quality and that in the first year we might struggle a bit so that I would play 80 minutes.

“But the team actually turned out alright and we’ve gone on from there,” Nat said.

The Sheagles first grabbed attention after competing in the in VAFA’s Lightning Cup back in April.

Despite going in with low expectations, the Sheagles managed to win their four games, before advancing to the Grand Final and taking the tournament.

“There’s 40 new teams that have come in this year, and this was a chance to expose the girls to matches because they didn’t want the girls to come out underdone for the season.

“We played St Mary’s in the final and we just got it done,” Zoe said.

Results in the Lightning Cup and performances in grading games have placed the side in VAFA’s Premier Division, and though the girls thought they might be out of their depth, the reality has been anything but.

“Our first Premier game was against Brunswick, and everyone thought we would get done by 60 points.

“It was a wet game, we went out and we weren’t too confident, but we kicked the first and went from there,” Nat said.

The Sheagles currently sit in 3rd position on the ladder, only percentage below the two teams above.

“We’ve actually been really good, we even won our game in round three by 60 points.

“I think we were all a bit worried because everyone was talking up Premier, but we’ve been playing well,” Lexie said.

Playing in Premier division has further advantages for the Warrandyte women, with scouts and coaches keeping a close eye on the games.

“There’s some great players in the Premier division and there were even scouts at the Lightning Cup, so its definitely a platform for the AFLW.

“Each game we are improving, not just working on skills but also on tactics, so we are only going to get better,” Zoe said.

Coach Tom Stafford and Assistant Coach Luke Boyd are certainly in luck with their Warrandyte contingent, who have without doubt played a major role in the Sheagles rapid rise.

Templestowe win the tussle


Templestowe won over Warrandyte in the annual STOP. One Punch Can Kill cup, with both Reserve and Senior outfits winning comprehensively.

STOP. One Punch Can Kill, an organization founded in 2013 by Caterina Politi after the tragic death of her son, David Cassai (a member of both the Warrandyte and Templestowe communities), is dedicated to teaching others the dangers of violence.

Both Warrandyte and Templestowe football clubs have been avid supporters of the cause, and changed the name of the Yarra Cup Challenge match to the STOP. One Punch Can Kill Cup in 2016 to further lend their hand to the organization.

Reserves

The Reserves struggled early in the game, kicking just the one major in the opening quarter.

Zac Ratcliffe continued his good form, constantly attacking the ball, but Warrandyte couldn’t manage to create clear-cut forward chances.

However, Warrandyte’s defence held firm, managing to restrict Templestowe well throughout the first half, and holding the margin to just 19 points at the major break.

Unfortunately, Josh Huntly sustained a broken arm in the second quarter, an injury that will see him spend a significant amount of time on the sideline.

The Bloods started the third term with great purpose, peppering the goals and generally running over Templestowe.

Sadly, Warrandyte would rue missed opportunities in front of goal to bring the game within reach, and despite only trailing by 16 points at three quarter time, fell by over eight goals at the final siren 3.7 25 to 12.5 77.

Seniors

The Senior side mirrored the Reserves early in the game, finishing the first quarter without recording a score while Templestowe piled on five goals.

In the second term Warrandyte managed to click into gear, with young star David Wilson kicking two terrific majors to ignite the Bloods.

Former Templestowe player Michael Cullum also managed to get one on the board as Warrandyte continued the charge, outscoring Templestowe for the quarter to trail by 29 points at the half.

Throughout the second half, emotion began to get the better of a few players out on the park, but both sides settled down to continue a decent second half of footy.

The Bloods, in particular Cullum, Troy Ratcliffe and Wilson, fought bravely throughout the third and fourth term, with Cullum adding another major.

Sadly, the Bloods were unable to make any real inroads on the margin, with Templestowe continuing to pick apart the defence to score when necessary.

When the final siren sounded, the Bloods trailed by 42 points, 7.10 52 to 14.10 94.

The Bloods face off against fierce rivals Ringwood in their next fixture – again at Warrandyte Reserve – and will look to secure a vital victory.

Despite a less than ideal result, the club can take away that STOP. One Punch Can Kill’s message about the dangers one punch can do was delivered.

Photo sourced from Warrandyte Football Club Facebook page

 

Junior Bloods’ name leaders


THE Warrandyte Junior football club have announced their leadership group for 2017, naming Ben Dickson as skipper to lead the side this season.

Selected by the Colts coaching staff, fellow players and the committee, Dickson will be supported by vice captains Jack VanDerRee and Leo Garrick.

Dickson was also the recipient of the Ben McKellar perpetual shield, in honour of former Colt Ben McKellar, who was captain in 1998 but unable to play out the season after contracting leukaemia, tragically passing away in 1999.

During the interview process all three players displayed qualities that epitomise the values the Junior football club wishes to display — a strong sense of community, equality, and feeling of belonging.

All three have played their younger years of football at the club and are leading by example, getting involved with AusKick, the Senior side and other teams.

During the season, the trio will also be charged with organizing a community event.

Tough shakedown for Bloods at Chirnside Park


THE Warrandyte Bloods fell in both fixtures in their 2017 season opener, losing to a chipper Chirnside Park outfit at Kimberley Reserve on the weekend.

Both Warrandyte teams were handicapped with injuries, with several players failing to pass their midweek fitness test.

Before play commenced one minute’s silence was observed, in memory of former Chirnside Park player Brian Pedler who died October 2016.

Drew Hollingsworth, father of Reserves player Jake Hollingsworth, was also remembered.

First on the field were the Reserves: they put in a nifty defensive performance to ensure the game remained an arm-wrestle, but inaccurate goal kicking and a difficult breeze allowed Chirnside to take the spoils.

Andre Balemian kicked the first goal of the campaign for the Warrandyte Reserves and the Bloods defence looked steadfast, with Bryce Leeanarts and Drew Corke applying terrific pressure in the back half.

Chirnside made better use of the wind in the second quarter, holding Warrandyte scoreless while tacking on 18 points themselves.

Throughout the second half, returnee Daniel Large looked lively, booting a major and providing a spark down the left-hand side of the ground.

Unfortunately, while the Bloods defence was relatively strong throughout, the forwards struggled to create opportunities.

The Reserves welcome back past favourite Daniel Large, whose performance this weekend was arguably best afield for the Bloods.

Chirnside Park Reserves: 5.10.40

Warrandyte Reserves: 3.9.27

For the Seniors, windy conditions and the Bloods lack of familiarity within a new look outfit played into Chirnside Park’s hands; the Seniors were defeated comfortably after a strong first quarter.

Much like the Reserves, they started the game kicking with the breeze and hit the ground running.

Jason Fitzgerald got the Bloods revved up with an early goal, and new-recruit Ryan Tester looked comfortable off the half back line.

Former Colts player Jake Trewella was exhilarating in his Senior debut and the Bloods rattled off four majors in the first term to lead by 19 points at the first change.

Sadly, this only seemed to kick Chirnside into gear, who were far more dangerous with the breeze.

The backline began to show a few cracks, and Chirnside Park’s big forwards started to assert their dominance.

The home side slammed on nine goals for the quarter to put Warrandyte in disarray, and the Bloods were never able to recover.

Jake Bentley put in a solid shift and Tom Naughtin played a commanding role in defence, but Chirnside never looked like relinquishing control, running out a 74-point winners.

Chirnside Park Seniors: 17.17.119

Warrandyte Seniors: 7.3.45

Warrandyte will now turn their attention towards the first home game of the season after the Easter break on April 22, the first of a series of “themed” home games that will take place over the season.

“Community Day” will promote and acknowledge the support of local businesses, sponsors, and supporters, who will be encouraged to attend.

Complementing this is a ceremony for the opening of the Bendigo Bank Gym.

Warrandyte’s double delight


Warrandyte Cricket Club have had a highly successful end to season 2016/17 with their Fourth XI team and Under 14s junior team winning their respective RDCA Premierships.

In back to back games at the Warrandyte Cricket Ground, the Under 14s started off the successful weekend for Warrandyte with a five-wicket win.

Alan L. Reidy Shield

The Under 14s won the Alan L. Reidy Shield after being asked to bowl first against St Andrews at home.

Chris Rakuscek, coming off a season splitting his skills between junior and senior cricket, got the wickets tumbling early, taking two top order wickets to have St Andrews reeling.

Rakuscek (4/23) and Brady Poole (2/16) opened the bowling strongly, with Tom Jackson (2/18) and Lachie Haberfield (2/22) taking the remaining wickets on day one of the final, to dismiss the opposition within 33.2 overs and give their team a total of 108 to chase for the title.

Warrandyte capably chased down the total with Ethan Ward (13) retiring off his 50 balls at the top of the order while the middle order capably chased the total down around him.

Warrandyte batted exceptionally well in partnerships to make quick work of the runs, with Poole (43) guiding the run chase home with some smooth hitting, before Jackson (11) hit the winning boundary to give the juniors win.

The flag tops off a great season for the junior program, with Poole becoming one of the youngest players in club history to play First Eleven Senior Cricket, and many team members making their senior cricket debut.

Neil Tull Shield

Following the big juniors win, the Fourth XI hosted Heathmont Baptist to complete for the Neil Tull Shield also at the Warrandyte Cricket Ground.

Warrandyte faced Heathmont for the fifth time this season, having beaten them successfully all season, including in the Qualifying Finals where they arguably at their tightest hit out of the season.

After captain Dean Gidley won the toss and elected to bat, Warrandyte faced some tight early bowling before losing both openers, Goddard (10) and Molyneux (9) in tight procession before the first drinks break.

James Weatherley (32) combined with Daniel Wellesley (105) with an excellent partnership to put Warrandyte back into a leading position, before Wellesley would go on to play what would be a match winning innings.

Wellesley, joined by Brett Kline (34), Ison (16), Gidley (22) and Prangley (14), would escalate the run scoring following the lunch break on day one, with some late hitting ensuring Warrandyte finished with a highly competitive 8/250 from their 70 overs in front of a large, vocal home crowd.

Wellesley’s century will long stand as one of the greater innings seen at the Warrandyte Cricket Ground, with his control and speed of bat impressing all that watched.

A confident Warrandyte returned the next day to finish the job, but knew they faced an on form top order from Heathmont.

Heathmont’s opening partnership sent nerves through the Warrandyte camp with an opening stand of 44.

However, Ison would take the crucial opening wicket and from there an essential procession occurred.

Stephen Warr toiled away from the IGA end of the ground for 16 overs throughout the day, taking a crucial wicket in the Heathmont middle order, combined with some persistent line and length from Prangley.

Ison was matched with his excellent form with the ball by captain Gidley, who finished with the figures of 4/35 including three wickets in tight order following the lunch break.

By the time Daniel Woodhead took the final wicket, caught behind by Goddard, Warrandyte would win by 80 runs and knew they had the flag in the bag.

The win marks two premiership flags for captain Gidley, but the first for club lifetime member Stephen Goddard, who after 25 years of playing at the WCC will savour the weekend’s event for a while.

Family talent Poole runs deep


 

Most families are proud to boast just one child playing high-level sport at a young age. Other families, such as the Pooles, are lucky enough to possess three. Brothers Brady (13), Darcy (16) and Jack (19) have established themselves as cornerstone members of Warrandyte’s cricket program, all playing roles in the First and Second XI for the Bloods.

The trio recently reached significant milestones within the local cricketing landscape for different reasons.

The brothers were first the talk of the town when they were all named to play together for the Second XI at the beginning of the season, before Brady made further waves when he became the youngest player in club history to run out for the Firsts aged just 13.

“We started off the year in the Twos – at the start of the season Dad said there was a huge announcement about it at the team selection – it was a big surprise that Brady was playing Twos because he played Sixes last year, and it was a really big deal that we played on the same side because we play so much cricket here in the backyard. It’s really great playing with each other,” said Darcy Poole.

After all playing together for the Second XI, Brady was eventually named in the Firsts, an honor that wasn’t lost on the young all-rounder.

“It was a big deal – I didn’t really expect it to be honest – certainly at the start of the season I didn’t expect to; just to be playing with people who have played at a good level of cricket, a level I want to play at when I’m older it’s a big deal to me.

“It’s different, there’s more persistent play.

“You play against some really good players who have had good careers in cricket and then come back down to a local level — it’s not too huge a jump from the Seconds, but it’s noticeable,” Brady says.

One of the major benefits of playing up the order for the boys has been the opportunity to play and work with club coach Jake Sherriff, which both brothers consider a massive benefit.

“When I first played with him that was one of the biggest things, playing with someone who has played district cricket; but even last year when I was in the Sixes, which is the lowest division, he was still coming down and telling me how to improve my game,” Brady said.

The family’s progression is made more remarkable when you consider just how young they are and how much experience they lack.

Both Darcy and Brady have just four years of cricket under their belt, and even less senior cricket exposure.

Despite this, both players are logging strong individual and team performances.

“I’m a batsman, I don’t really bowl much, personally I made 87 earlier this year just before Xmas,” Darcy says.

“I’m more of a bowler, and sometimes bat, but not usually in the seniors – I don’t have too many standout games, I haven’t had the standout performances like Darce – I’ve probably had more success keeping teams playing the way we want them to play,” Brady says.

The journey the brothers have taken to becoming talented cricketers began with Jack, who as the eldest was able to influence his younger siblings.

“We both started playing at the same time because Jack forced us to go down to training – it was after Christmas a while back and we had just started playing backyard cricket — he told us to come down see what is like and we haven’t stopped since,” Darcy says.

“Before we started playing cricket we didn’t even think about it, we thought it was boring, Dad would be watching it and we thought “why would you watch tha”, but we started to get into it and now we can’t stop,” Brady says.

Warrandyte Cricket Club are certainly glad that the brothers made the decision to pick up the bat and ball, and with youngest brother Oscar — aged 11 — still waiting in the wings, the Pooles may soon have another superstar wearing the baggy whites at Warrandyte Reserve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warrandyte runs again


Saturday Market means the first weekend of the month is always a busy time for Warrandyte, but last Sunday Warrandyte was a-buzz with runners of all shapes, sizes and ages as the Sports Club hosted the annual Run Warrandyte fun run.
A slightly overcast morning made for perfect running conditions, the run organising committee were excited to report their best participant numbers ever with over 600 registered runners.
The run attracted many regular runners, including the Wooten family who had the whole family at the event.
Even the footy players were involved in the action.
“It’s a community event so we get the footy players involved in participation, one club one community,” said Pete Muskat, a member of the Warrandyte Football club.
The weather and the general condition of the participants was particularly good this year with
super-speedy times set in the four endurance distances.
The 15K winner, Brynton Ashton, set a time of 1:02:21 which given the hilly nature of the course is impressive.
But the day was more about families having fun through exercise, as young Henry Bate (pictured left) demonstrated when he took on the 2.2K run with his family.
Henry managed to run the course —with the help of his dad— in 23 minutes.
This year, as well as the marshals and the CFA, runners out on course were entertained with live music on the corner of Pound Bend Road; volunteer marshal Ben Treyford expressed his delight in having the addition of a live band on course.
“They were awesome, we clapped after each song and even the less serious runners had a bit of a dance as they came through,” he said.
Run Warrandyte also featured “The Gift” for its second year.
The 100m handicapped heats were,
once again, a great success and have established themselves as an integral part of the Run Warrandyte experience.
The calculated handicapping by Gift organiser, Peter Sharpe, saw competitors run their hearts out in a thrilling grand final, which saw all seven competitors finish in under 12 seconds.
The winner of the Gift was Nicolas Sharpe who ran the 100 meters in 11.335.

Gift winner Nicolas Sharpe crossing the line in the thrilling final

Commentator Craig Davidson took a few minutes to speak to the Diary and reflect on the event.
“As far as coming down here at 6am on a Sunday morning, I cannot think of any other place to be, it’s sensational.
“My fellow commentator Tim, who has commentated on a number of these events, he was astounded with the times in which the runners were coming through — especially in the 10 and 15K events.”
Our Diary photographers were out and about on the day taking some awesome snaps of the running action, check out our Run Warrandyte page on the Diary website for a selection of pictures from the event.

Full race results for the endurance distances can be found on the Run Warrandyte page of the Warrandyte Sports Club website.

Tennis hot shots at Rod Laver Arena

Four groups of young tennis players from the ANZ Tennis Hot Shots program took over both Rod Laver Arena and Margaret Court Arena last Thursday as Tennis Australia renamed Australia Day the “Tennis Guru Day”.

Forty players aged seven to nine from Warrandyte Tennis Club, Warrandyte Primary School and Milgate Primary School participated in the Tennis Guru Hot Shots program on centre court.

The demonstrations highlighted some of the activities the young tennis players learn in the Hot Shots coaching program.

For half an hour the kids, aged between seven and nine years, demonstrated their skills to the crowd.

They were then followed by the professionals in their Australian Open matches.

While the kids strutted their stuff, coach Craig Haslam was interviewed by Tennis Australia for big screen crosses at the change of ends.

“These kids ran onto a huge stadium and played the game of tennis completely independent of adult support for 30 minutes.

The demonstration was not rehearsed, it was just kids having the time of their life playing tennis. I was so proud of them,” said Mr Haslam.

He must have heard the words “they are so cute” at least a hundred times that morning.

The Hot Shots tennis program demonstrations are a regular feature of the Australian Open and other demonstrations took part on the other major courts throughout the Grand Slam.

On your marks Warrandyte

WITH only one month to go, volunteers were representing Run Warrandyte at the February Riverside Market last Saturday.

The annual event, which is now in its sixth year, grows in both event size and distances.

Now a regular event in Warrandyte on the March sporting calendar, this year’s Run Warrandyte has partnered with charity Stop, One Punch Can Kill (SOPCK) making this year’s event not only a celebration of fitness within the community but also a stand, or should I say sprint, against violence too.

“We are very excited to include SOPCK in our event this year,” said David Dyason of the Run Warrandyte Committee.

“We have introduced a team fundraising aspect to this year’s event with prizes being awarded to the team which raises the most money for the charity.”

The SOPCK charity was set up in the wake of the death of David Cassai, who was a killed on New Year’s Eve 2012.

Mr Cassai had ties to the local community as he attended Warrandyte High School and often watched the footy.

The Warrandyte footy club got behind the SOPCK campaign in the 2016 season.

As one-punch deaths become an increasing problem, sports clubs are often used as a conduit to engage young people in the Stop campaign, and with the sports club contributing to the management and facilities that Run Warrandyte uses, it seems fitting to have SOPCK as the event’s first official charity.

“People like the philosophy of running, but are often put off by the physical aspect.”

“I think having a fundraising part to the run will encourage people to sign up and get out on the course,” said John, a member of the Run Warrandyte team.

The course is similar to last year with one loop that brings runners back to the sports oval; run distances are determined by the number of laps they do.

The Run Warrandyte Committee will have the usual support of the local fireys, keeping everyone cool, as well as some on-course entertainment to keep everyone’s spirits up on that long climb up to The Pound.

The Grand Hotel Gift, a 100 metre, handicapped sprint is also back after last year’s successful integration into the running event.

While registration for the Gift alone is possible, participants in the 2.2K, 5K, 10K and 15K distances are encouraged to also enter the Gift as entry for these people is complimentary.

To help with training, Run Warrandyte local personal trainer Chris of RivvaPT has produced a training plan, which is available through the Run Warrandyte Facebook page, for the 5K and 10K distances.

“We have had a number of people ask us if we can walk any of the runs,” said Mr Dyason.

“Because we have to close public roads, if people want to only walk, we suggest they enter the 2.2 or 5K event.”

The Gift and the longer runs all start and finish on the oval, where a number of local clubs and businesses are expected to be on display, making it a great morning out for both runners and non-runners.

The run takes place on March 5.

Run Warrandyte registration can be found online and the Run Warrandyte team regularly posts updates and competitions on their Facebook page.

Warrandyte’s footy girls are ready to rumble

Next year is set to be ground breaking for women’s football Australia-wide, following the inception of the National Women’s competition.

Many community clubs are following suit, placing an emphasis on boosting and developing a culture of female football at their organisation.

Warrandyte Junior Football Club is no exception, looking to field a number of girls’ teams in 2017.

About 40 girls across all age groups attended the WJFC Girls’ footy open day at Warrandyte Re- serve on November 20.

Eugene Hanson, the WJFC Colts coach and a number of club leaders and Colts players ran training drills, which were completed with intense determination, despite very hot conditions.

The girls were extremely impressive and due to the growing nature of the code, WJFC is pleased to offer young girls in the community the chance to play organised football across a range of age groups.

If you are interested in being part of youth girls football at WJFC email secretary@warrandytejfc.org

Cricket resumes: hat-trick hero Steve

CRICKET has returned to Warrandyte for the 2016/17 season, but due to some bemusing league decisions and wet pitches, there have only been six results from a possible 20 games.

Despite a few sunny forecasts on Saturdays, the RDCA has elected to call two different rounds off across the league to ensure fair competition, with varying quality in grounds. On the positive side, Warrandyte’s seniors had only lost one game by October’s end.

In the available games, Warrandyte showed extremely promising signs. The First XI and Second XI both took victories in Round 1. For the First XI, Dave Mooney started off yet another season in fine nick, posting 47 not out to guide Warrandyte to a very defendable 170 at a slow Dorset Oval.

In doing so, Mooney became the highest all time First XI run scorer, setting another record in his golden career with the club.

South Croydon was under pressure from the start, with Daniel Barry and Alex McIntosh taking apart the batting lineup with three and two wickets respectively.

Warrandyte went on to win by 45 runs.

In Round 2, Warrandyte faced a tough task at home, chasing 351 after Templeton thrashed the bowling attack around the Warrandyte Cricket Ground. Warrandyte’s coach Jake Sherriff (6/76) was reliable with the ball on a tough day, taking late scalps to peg back the wickets before Warrandyte was saved by the rain.

The Second XI was also victorious in Round 1, recording a strong home victory against Warranwood. Dale Lander led from the top of the order with 62, while new skipper Campbell Holland slashed 47 to give his side an excellent start. Lander would be promoted to the First XI the following round and Warrandyte knocked out 207 before sending in the bowling attack.

The home side was able to dismiss the Warrandwood batsmen in quick order on a fast wicket, taking a 50- run victory thanks to tight bowling from Tom Ellis (3/10) and Campbell Holland (3/13).

In other results, Warrandyte’s Third XI thanked Tyson Brent and Josh Aitken for providing 264 in their first game of the year.

On a postal stamp ground against Montrose, Brent’s batting was exceptional considering it was his first knock of the season, giving the team good faith in their batting lineup.

The Fourth XI cruised to victory in its run chase against Heathmont Baptists, returning to the holy grail ground at Stintons Reserve.

Patient batting from Dave Molyneux and direct bowling from John Prangley and Daniel Woodhead made the difference.

The Fifth XI was unable to chase down Ainslie Park, despite some strong individual performances. Ben Sprout pegged back the Ainslie Park batsmen with a ve-wicket haul, effectively closing out the innings with late strikes to hold the batters to 207.

Stephen Grocott provided hope for Warrandyte with 41no, but they eventually fell 42 runs short.

Results:
First XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte 6/170 (Mooney 47 not out) d South Croydon 8/135 (D Barry 3/20, McIn- tosh 2/16). Round 2 – Warrandyte drew Templeton 8/351 (Sherriff 6/76)

Second XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte 6/207 (Lander 62, Holland 47) def. Warranwood 157 (T Ellis 3/10, Holland 3/13). Round Two – Warrandyte drew with North Ringwood.

Third XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with East Ringwood. Round 2 – Warrandyte 3/264 (Brent 106, Aitken 59 not out) d Montrose 135 (Smead 3/16, Ison 2/16). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with Norwood.

Fourth XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with Warranwood. Round 2 – Warrandyte 3/135 (Molyneux 60) d Heathmont Baptist 7/130 (Prang- ley 3/17, Woodhead 2/19). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with South Warrandyte.

Fifth XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with Croydon North. Round 2 – Warrandyte 165 (Grocott 41 not out, Jackson 32) d by Ainslie Park 7/207 (Sproat 5/34). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with Heathmont Baptist.

Sixth XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with North Ringwood. Round 2 – Warrandyte d by Heathmont Baptist (forfeit). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with North Ringwood.

All Bodi’s well for our BMX future


BMX began during the early 1970s in the United States when children began racing their bicycles on dirt tracks in southern California. Like skateboarding, surfing, snowboarding and Jack Daniels, the Aussies waited for the Americans to mature, tweak and be the general crash test dummies before embracing a new culture in 1975 (even then us southerners let the Queenslanders give it a crack before taking it on).

The year 1985 saw the soil get turned for the Park Orchards BMX track. In true Green Wedge fashion the council decided to reduce, reuse and recycle by building on the old tip. This must have been very handy when a tire was popped, a quick dig of a hole and surely an old tire would’ve been found?

Thirty years later the Park Orchards BMX club has continued to prosper and it has been an exciting year with a large influx of new members joining our existing members to speed their way around the track every second Saturday afternoon for club racing.

Recently the club was very excited to announce the beginning of major refurbishments to the track. Tireless work by the committee led to the securing of a HUGE grant by everybody’s favorite Warrandyte bank, the Warrandyte Community Bank (branch of Bendigo Bank). Manningham council has also jumped on board the reinvigoration train which will see the installation of lights and the asphalting of the berms. This will bring the track up the national standard, allowing our riders to go faster (and safer) and be able to see at night (also safer).

Following on from an exciting Olympic campaign by our Aussie riders in Rio, the club hosted a “Come and Try” day in early September that saw 28 new riders come and try BMX for the first time. Rio Olympian, Bodi Turner, donated his time and expertise on the day to coach our “come and triers”. The club has since convinced Bodi into running coaching sessions every Saturday until the end of the year.

Due to some crappy wisdom that claims “with good must come some bad” the club’s bubble deflated a bit two weeks ago when the clubrooms were broken into. The dastardly thieves took off with four racing bikes. With their energy obviously waning they also rode off into the metaphorical sunset with the canteen’s supply of Mars Bars, Gatorade and Coke.

The Warrandyte community spirit was brought to the fore yet again when in response to people wanting to donate money, a Go Fund Me page was set up. The money that has been donated will enable the club to purchase some new bikes (maybe even a couple of Mars Bars). For that the club says thank you.

Under 15’s bag flag

Warrandyte Junior Football Club experienced an emotional day at Victoria Park in Kew last month with one out of two teams tasting victory in their respective Grand Finals.

The U15s side put on a masterclass to defeat Macleod comfortably by 44 points, but the U14s were left heart- broken after falling to Banyule by a solitary point in the final minute.

A hefty crowd of red and white were present to watch the young Bloods go into battle, kicked off by the Under 14s side.

Warrandyte got off to the best possible start, kicking a goal within 10 seconds of the first bounce. Slightly scrappy play ensued from then on, but the Bloods were able to hold steady and take a seven-point lead into the first change.

Banyule was sharper throughout the second term, but the Bloods found some spark with a high mark and goal to star player Chase Wallace. Brady Poole kicked a much needed steadier right before half- time to keep Warrandyte close, trailing by just a point.

Whatever was said at halftime to the Warrandyte forwards obviously had effect, because the Bloods rattled off two quick re goals right after the long break to regain control of the game.

Wallace continued to put on a show and Warrandyte looked in the box seat with a 15-point lead going into the final term.

What followed was one of the most frantic quarters of football of the season.

Banyule hit back to draw the margin to within a goal with just six minutes to play, before eventually wrestling the lead back with just three minutes on the clock. Warrandyte was unable to muster a clearcut chance and despite playing a terrific game fell agonizingly close, losing 9.8.62 to 10.3.63.

Thankfully for Bloods fans, the Under 15s side was able to record a terrific victory in their Grand Final to bring home silverware for the club.

Jack Boyd was the star of the show kicking five goals to lead the attack. Boyd was ably supported by Leo Garrick in the middle, while Lachie O’Reilly and Sam Martini were defensively sound and hard at it when it counted.

Most impressive was the professionalism and brilliant mental performance from the outfit, keeping their cool throughout in the 12.11.83 to 6.3.39 victory.

“We trained well, we kept our emotions in check, we didn’t get ahead of ourselves. We had some assistance from the Colts during the week, we understood how they (Macleod) play and we executed perfectly,” coach Eugene Hansen told the Diary. The Bloods broke Macleod down by the 15-minute mark of the rst term and from then on continued to put in a full four-quarter performance. All players were contributors, some kicked flashy goals, while others performed crucial one percenters to ensure Warrandyte was out on top when the siren sounded.

“Everyone had an equal opportunity and everyone contributed, and some of the boys probably played 15-20 percent above their usual level. Typical of that was probably Thomas Mckenzie who kicked a goal up forward, he’s not renowned for kicking goals and the celebration after that was amazing,” Hansen said.

Equally as impressive was the turnout from the Warrandyte faithful to support both sides, with Hansen noting a historical significance to the crowd that others may have missed.

“It was fantastic to see life members from the footy club there, I think around 30 years ago I was involved with winning a flag at the same age group and maybe eight or nine of that premiership side came down to watch,” Hansen said.

For both sides, making the final alone was a tremendous achievement and it seems Warrandyte Football Club has some stars in the making over the coming years.