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Teskey Brothers win big at Music Victoria Awards

THE MUSIC industries finest gathered in Melbourne during Melbourne Music Week for The Age Music Victoria Awards.

Melbourne soul tastemaker and RRR host Chris Gill and PBS presenter Lyndelle Wilkinson hosted the 2017 Awards acknowledging the best acts, releases, venues and festivals throughout the State.

This year’s awards saw some familiar faces gracing the prize-winners’ stage on multiple occasions as well as some first-time awardees, in what was an absolute standout celebration of the past 12 months of great local music.

Warrandyte’s favourite son’s The Teskey Brothers took out this year’s Best Emerging Act.

A previous winner of the award Remi was up for Best Male Artist this year but was edged out by perennial favourite and music legend Paul Kelly, so we hope to see the Teskey Brothers continue to go from strength to strength on the back of this prestigious award.

Frontman, Josh Teskey told the Diary that they are blown away by the amazing year they have had.

“From being a band from Warrandyte, that in our 10 years of playing together had never left Victoria, we’ve been fortunate enough to be able to travel our music all around the country and overseas to the States and London.

“Our album Half Mile Harvest has had a much bigger reach than we ever could have imagined,” he said.

Music Victoria CEO Patrick Donovan commented on this year’s impressive talent as he congratulated all of the winners and nominees.

“We are very proud that many of these winners haven’t just made an impact in Australia over the last 12 months, but acts such as Jen Cloher, The Teskey Brothers, King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard and A.B. Original have been flying the Victorian flag overseas,” he said.

To top off what has been such an incredible year for the Teskey Brothers, Half Mile Harvest was also awarded best soul/funk album.

Josh Teskey said the award was “the icing on the cake”.

“We’re so humbled people have responded to this album with such love, and avid thanks to Vic Music for everything they do for this thriving Melbourne music scene,” he said.

Major sponsor for the night was The Age, and Editor of the paper’s EG, Martin Boulton said “In our 12th year, it’s perhaps more satisfying than ever to see our genre award winners also making a name for themselves nationally and overseas.

“The huge array of talent nominated this year speaks volumes about the health of our local music industry,” he said.

Following the awards verdicts as per tradition, the festivities continued into the night with the official Awards After Party featuring killer live performances from minimalist disco act Harvey Sutherland and Bermuda, powerhouse trio Cable Ties and post-punk four-piece Gold Class.

Party starters the EG Allstars Band also backed some special guest performances from Josh Teskey (The Teskey Brothers), Archie Roach, Gretta Ray, Ella Thompson (GL), Michelle Nicolle, Birdz, Mojo Juju and Jim Lawrie performing some of the best songs of the year.

It was a big month for the local lads, as they also supported Australian music legends Midnight Oil for one of their sold-out performances at the Myer Music Bowl.

The boys are busy continuing with their tour around Australia and New Zealand, but if you are lucky, you can catch them on a brief visit back home on January 26 for a special twilight performance at Melbourne Zoo.

CFA give WHS students valuable life skills

WARRANDYTE CFA’s youth crew are celebrating 20 years of firefighting and fun.

Beginning in the 1990’s as a Year 9 and 10 program at Warrandyte High School, the youth crew started as a practical elective for students wanting an outdoor and hands on experience.

Over the 20 years, more than 880 students have experienced the program, with dozens going on to volunteer and work with the CFA.

Those that walk through the youth crew’s doors have come out the other end as resilient and community minded young adults, pursuing careers as paramedics, career firefighters or in fields like engineering.

Will Hodgson, an instructor for the youth crew and First Lieutenant at the Warrandyte CFA, says the program provides a unique experience for students, especially those that may not want to follow traditional academic routes.

“The world has lots of things to offer — It doesn’t matter how well you’re doing in maths or science… with the CFA program you’ve got life skills, first aid skills and they’re working within their communities.

“The impact this has… everyone has helped out in the community; I feel so humbled to know that we’ve touched the lives of young people so that they can carry the CFA values throughout their lives and make change in their communities,” he said.

The program includes trips to the CFA and MFB headquarters, an excursion to the fire museum, fire fighting camps and outdoor education activities.

Students learn how to use and respect the equipment and fight fires first hand.

Dave Kahuaiwa from Warrandyte High School cannot believe how the program has evolved and succeeded.

“They arrive as a jumble of kids, and they leave with really great leadership skills and team skills — they go home and have a conversation with their families about fire preparedness and fire plans.

“What better community group to be a part of in Warrandyte than the CFA? Because of where we’re situated, it’s so important.,” said Dave.

Will Hodgson says the impact the youth crew has in kids’ lives is profound, and it is an experience he is incredibly grateful to be a part of.

“Students need to know that they’re worthwhile, and this program gives them the opportunity to be free from academic pressures for a while.

“This shows them that there’s a position in life for them, that the world needs people with so many different skills, and if they want to join the CFA afterwards, well that’s a great bonus.”

Five houses unite under one roof

Manningham’s five Neighbourhood Houses have formed a new strategic alliance, which will improve access to adult education for the municipality’s residents.

Under the banner “Manningham Learns” the Neighbourhood Houses of Warrandyte, Park Orchards, Wonga Park, The Pines Learning and Living and Learning at Ajani can to pool their resources and aggregate each centre’s courses and activities into one place, making it easier for adults to access courses and activities across the municipality.

Outgoing Mayor of Manningham Cr Michelle Kleinert told the Diary having all of Manningham’s Neighbourhood Houses united will grant residents with more options when exploring their adult education needs.

“When you consider you have Warrandyte, Park Orchards, Wonga Park they are all offering different things, if someone is living in an area and they only know Warrandyte they are missing out and Park Orchards is not that far; so it gives us better access for our community to feel they have better access to more tools,” she said.

In 2016 10,500 people enrolled in activities at Neighbourhood Houses across the municipality, according to data from the 2016 Census, that would indicate between 10 and 12 per cent of the residents of Manningham who are beyond compulsory schooling age are involved in some form of activity or course run by Neighbourhood Houses.

At the Manningham Learns launch, Cr Kleinert spoke on the importance of this alliance in promoting education within the municipality.

“For young people who are struggling with learning, with education; when they see their parents and grandparents still learning — it is a very powerful message for us to give back to the next generation,” she said.

There are around 300 organisations in Victoria who are eligible for funding under the capacity and innovations fund, the money helps organisations evolve the way they engage with the community to provide education, but there is only so much money to go around and often strategic alliances are a more attractive way to fund enhancements, but alliances between independent organisations are tricky, especially in the adult education sector.

The Manningham Learns project has taken 18 months to get from planning to launch and has meant the five Neighbourhood Houses have had to change their view of each other, they have had to become collaborators instead of competitors, a task not easy to achieve and one which Julie Hebert, Manager of Training and Participation Regional Support for north eastern Victoria Region praised.

“There are about 300 [community education organisations] in the State and if every single entity tries to do it by themselves in this modern context, it is a big risk — it is working together that saves everybody in the end.

“It isn’t an easy task to get five organisations who are vastly different to agree on a course of action to do the same thing, it is a very, very, very hard task.

“It is a very, very great outcome, what you’ve done, you should be very proud,” she said at the launch of Manningham Learns.

This new alliance has received accolades from all levels of government and the managers of the five Neighbourhood Houses have worked hard to make this happen, under the umbrella of Manningham Learns they will be able to make their administration more efficient which means each manager can focus on providing a better education service, as Pauline Fyffe, manager of Park Orchards Community House explained.

“Initially we still have a lot of work to do in determining how the alliance will operate and the benefits we will see, the project has been about bringing us together, we have come a long way on that journey but there is still quite a lot to do in terms of how we will operate, how we will make our lives easier, this is the beginning,” she said.

Emma Edmond, of Warrandyte Neighbourhood House added: “because we know each other a lot better now and there is a high level of trust amongst us we will be able to just put our hand up to do something I can do instead of all of us having to do the same thing individually”.

The efficient running of an organisation like Neighbourhood House is vital if it is to evolve the service it provides the community and a lot of the changes in policy which Manningham Learns has initiated will not be seen by most.

What will be seen is the ability to see, in one place, what all five Neighbourhood Houses have on offer, which will give those members of the community who are seeking to educate themselves further a more convenient picture of what courses and activities are available, and where.

“The biggest benefit is that all our services are now in one place, so they can access the website and download a course procure — it is a one stop shop for learning,” said Ms Fyffe.

Visit their new site

Communities speak out against North East Link

Alarm at the potential impact of North East Link is ramping up.

At a recent forum in Eltham, The Greens MP, Samantha Dunn, stated she believes the four proposed options are “pitting communities against each other”.

Ms Dunn called for communities to unite to oppose the construction of the North East Link in any form.

“It doesn’t matter where it is… it isn’t the right direction for Melbourne, it’s not going to solve the problems that you have it’s going to create enormous impacts in your communities… it doesn’t matter which part of northern Melbourne you live in, if this project goes ahead it is going to impact your area,” Ms Dunn said.

Greens advisor Alex Mark told the forum:

“All of the options lead to a loss of amenity, community facilities, schools and established residences, they carve up greenspace and require the acquisition of parkland, they generate pollution, they generate more traffic on local roads… all of them will further entrench car dependency and urban sprawl.

“What hasn’t been shown by the North East Link Authority (NELA) yet is that they will create land use change so you will see, light residential become commercial, industrial or far higher density residential areas — and that is not something that is reversible,” he said.

Mr Marks then put forward a suite of public transport projects which, combined, would cost less for the toll road, including upgrading rail, bus and tram and freight services to better serve the north east of Melbourne.

Manningham council have sent out a survey to gauge residents’ views on the project.

Manningham Council say they will use the data advocate on behalf of its residents on the preferred route and the design priorities.

The survey is open until 5pm November 17. Councillor Paul McLeish told the Diary he is arguing for improved public transport to be factored in to the plan.

“The North East Link at this point essentially completely fails to address public transport in any meaningful way — there is no inclusion of park and ride facilities, there is no expansion of existing park and ride facilities contemplated in any form there is no apparent consideration of heavy rail.

“If you are trying to plan for Melbourne for 30 years, which is what this infrastructure is about, in 30 years the population will be between 7–8 million people living in the city of Melbourne and you are going to need that outer loop rail just to make the rail network function,“ said Cr McLeish. Meanwhile the recently launched North East Link Forum (NELF) combines residents’ associations of Warrandyte, Park Orchards and Donvale who have come together to respond to issues around Route B and C, which would most likely impact these areas.

“These proposed routes would mean a 3km stretch of six-lane freeway thundering through the valley,” said NELF spokesperson Carli Lange-Boutle.

“We have followed the NE Link Authorities guidelines and have learnt nothing further to help us truly understand the impact on local roads, traffic, environment and residents…we are calling on Warrandytians to actively lobby against the impacts of Route B and C and join us in defending our Village character, our natural Yarra River valley bush land and surrounding Green Wedge buffers,” she said.

To have your say, Manningham Councillor Sophy Galbally has announced she will be holding a No Highway in Green Wedge protest at Stintons Reserve on Sunday, November 26 from 11am–1pm or contact NELF northeastlinkforum@gmail.com for information on how to get involved with their campaign.

Pigeon Bank application batted back to VCAT

THE SUPREME Court has dismissed the 2 Pigeon Bank Road case meaning it will now go to VCAT in January for a full hearing.

As reported in last month’s Diary, the case was originally heard on September 12 but Justice Kevin Bell reserved his decision until November 2.

Costs of the case are to be paid by the applicant, Phillip Mannerheim Holdings Pty Ltd. In a complicated legal case, which hinged on whether an email to Nillumbik Shire Council sent by neighbour Kim Cope was an objection or a submission; the court determined Mr Cope’s “polite” email represented an “expression of opposition” to the grant of the permit, and clarified that as being “a term of description ex post facto not a condition of eligibility a priori” which means Mr Cope’s email met all the requirements of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 for lodging an objection, and that VCAT’s earlier decision to continue with the case was valid.

Mr Cope was in attendance and spoke to the Diary following the decision.

“We are very happy with this judgment which enables us to move forward from here in the knowledge that the previous VCAT decisions were sound”.

Phillip Mannerheim, the applicant, whose planning application had been approved by Nillumbik Shire Council with conditions before the objectors took the case to VCAT, told the Diary “whilst disappointed by the Court’s decision, I will now be preparing for the Tribunal hearing in January next year.

“Council will be supporting my dwelling proposal, which is consistent with what has occurred on all of the surrounding lots (including on lots owned by people who oppose it) but will be more sensitively designed to the landscape and safer in terms of bushfire risks”.

The matter will now return to VCAT for a full hearing commencing on January 22 and set down for four days. If the VCAT hearing goes ahead in January, the Diary will report on the VCAT case in the February edition.

2 Pigeon Bank timeline up to this point

April: Planning application approved by Nillumbik, neighbour Kim Cope lodges a case with VCAT.

May: Original Objector Kim Cope and a collection of neighbours and community groups are allowed to for the coalition of objectors. Communityy groups involved in this coalition are the Warrandyte Community Association, Friends of Nillumbik and the Green Wedge Protection Group

July: After VCAT decide to go to Tribunal after the Practice Day Hearing, planning applicant Phillip Mannerheim takes VCAT’s decision to the Supreme Court (Warrandyte Diary July 2017, page 4)

October: Pigeon Bank has its day in court, the judge reserves his decision (Warrandyte Diary October 2017, page 5)

Community reaction

THE PLANNING application battle over 2 Pigeon Bank Road has attracted support from community groups on both sides of the arguement. In support of Kim Cope, a coalition of objectors approved by VCAT at the practice day hearing earlier in the year which includes the Warrandyte Community Association (WCA).

Not only did the WCA represent the coalition at the Supreme Court hearing but also sought representation for the coalition from not-for-profit environmental justice organisation Environmental Justice Australia (EJA).

Following the decision by Justice Kevin Bell, Nillumbik Pro Active Landowners (PALs) have released a statement in support of Phillip Mannerheim’s application to build on his land and their reaction to the Supreme Court decision.

Below are statements from groups on both sides of the argument.

 

 

Warrandyte Community Association (WCA) and Environmental Justice Australia (EJA) joint statement in reaction to the Supreme Court decision

 

The Warrandyte Community Association (WCA) welcomes the Supreme Court’s confirmation that everyday people can object to inappropriate developments in their community without their objections needing to pass specific legalistic hurdles,” said WCA spokesperson Jonathan Upson.

“Now that the Supreme Court has enabled the VCAT appeal to proceed, the WCA and other parties look forward to the opportunity to argue that clear-felling 740 trees to build one house on a ridgeline with nice views directly contradicts the Nillumbik and State Government planning schemes and requirements.

“The developer’s lawyers made it clear that if we were to fight this case and lose, they would seek an order for their legal costs against us. Therefore, I would like to acknowledge the courage of the three Community Associations – the WCA, Friends of Nillumbik and Green Wedge Protection Group – and several individuals who were parties to this case.

“The WCA, on behalf of the other parties, would like to sincerely thank Environmental Justice Australia for their invaluable assistance in prosecuting the Supreme Court case on our behalf.”

Environmental Justice Australia said the decision affirmed the importance of community participation in planning.

“Justice Bell’s decision represents a victory for common sense and fairness,” said Environmental Justice Australia CEO Brendan Sydes.

“The court’s decision emphasises the importance of minimising technicality and the value of community participation in our planning system.

“EJA is pleased to have been able to support the community in ensuring they can have a say about the important planning and environment issues raised by this permit application.”

 

Nillumbik Pro Active Landowners (PALs) statement in support of Phillip Mannerheim and in reaction to the Supreme Court decision

 

NILLUMBIK PALs welcomes the decision of the Victorian Supreme Court as it provides clarity in relation to the Mannerheim application to Council.

The Supreme Court action was purely related to a legal interpretation of a point of law.

It was not a result that confirmed a person’s right to object.

This was never an action that challenged that basic right. Further, it was not a reference to, or consideration of, the merits of the application. The merits will be determined by VCAT in January 2018.

PALs is conducting an online petition in support of Mr. Mannerheim’s right to build his home. To date this petition has 938 signatures.

This represents an incredible level of local support and as usual, sits in stark contrast to the mere handful that object.

“Objectors” now attached to the application were a result of implanted confected outrage based on highly emotive and misleading information.

Having completed their own buildings, they now oppose Mr. Mannerheim wishing to do the same, the hypocrisy is breathtaking.

PALs strongly support the Mannerheim application and will provide every possible assistance to ensure that this environmentally conscious home can be built delivering a superior end result than the existing vacant site.