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The Teskey Brothers perform at Fuji Rock

Photo: The Teskey Brothers Instagram

I WALKED along the meandering boardwalk from the White Stage — a most beautiful walk, spanning two kilometres in length, enclosed by lush greenery, bamboo forests and a canopy of trees for shade, with a rippling stream running alongside.

A part of me was excited with anticipation that there would be a band all the way from Warrandyte playing at Fuji Rock 2018.

It wasn’t long ago that I had sent clips and tidbits about this band to the Fuji Rock guys in Japan.

Coincidentally they were booked only a few weeks later. Nonetheless, they obviously stood out and caught the attention of the organisers.

We eventually enter the Field of Heaven, an outdoor stage within an enclave encircled by an eclectic mix of food tents, organic produce, teepees and craft beer.

It was surrounded by dense woodland, and by far the most chilled out area with a unique vibe — perfect atmosphere for The Teskey Brothers set.

From the moment The Teskey Brothers got on stage to do their sound checks, they gave a tiny yet robust glimpse of the solid performance that lay ahead.

This was cool with the audience who were either eating, ordering some beer or resting aching feet.

The band sounded pretty strong… until…it began… The magic started and their unique old school Motown sounds bellowed.

Folk moved in closer to the stage, some stopped in their tracks. When Josh Teske y (singer) unleashed his smoky, whiskey voice, the audience was taken back to an amazing analogue bygone era — I don’t think many saw it coming.

The fairly large crowd was mesmerised by the sounds of the six-piece band, two more members were added to create the horn section, which rounded off the tone quite beautifully. James from Fuji Rock Express added “ It can be strangely disorienting at times to see Josh speak between songs with his full Australian accent and happy go lucky demeanour then moments later witness the transportation to a rip roaring genuine blues wailer.”

We were treated to some songs that were over ten minutes in length. It was wonderful that each member was able to have their moment to do a solo or go off on a tangent.

During one of Sam’s climactic guitar solos, Josh ripped the set list off the ground to fan him with it, then crumpled it up and tossed it into the audience.

It was these charismatic and playful moments woven throughout that had the audience enamoured.

At the end of The Teskey Brothers hour-long set, it was clear that this was merely a taste of what this band has to offer.

They were captivating and engaged the crowd in their likeable, fun mannered ways. They were humble and appreciative of being able to perform at Fuji Rock.

The audience loved them and they were a favourite act for quite a few people.

Undoubtedly, The Teskey Brothers will be back at Fuji Rock, they have a great sound and left the audience wanting more.

Here’s to the potential and endless possibilities of what lies ahead for them.

Warrandyte, you should be proud. Fuji Rock is a three day Music Festival, nestled in the beautiful mountains of Niigata, Japan.

It is the third largest music event in the world, next to Coachella and Glastonbury.

It always features a solid line up. Fuji Rock is clean and green (the recycling process is meticulous).

It is a fun festival that is inclusive, strictly drug free and family friendly.

The majority of people are decked out in hiking and outdoor gear.

There are many areas to cater for all.

With stunning nature as the backdrop, it is a relaxing place to enjoy music and all the festivities.

Fuji Rock 2019 will take place from 26 July to 28 July.

If you would like your name on an exclusive wait list so that you do not miss out on this sell-out event please email: info@strikingproductions.com.au

 

Nillumbik says no to violence against women

NILLUMBIK Councillor, Jane Ashton lost her twin sister exactly 15 years ago.

Julie was murdered by her estranged husband. Her sister’s death is part of a sickening statistic where one woman per week is killed by a partner or former partner every week.

“We must change this,” Cr Ashton told a Council meeting recently.

Nillumbik Council listened and is taking a stand to promote gender equality and prevent violence against women and children, unanimously adopting a Gender Equity Policy.

Cr Ashton told the Diary she believes there is a link between gender equity and family violence.

“Equity is that everyone feels safe — and that physical attributes, your size, your strength, your gender, shouldn’t determine how vulnerable you potentially can be.

She says it is also about having respect.

“I think that if you are in a safe workplace, learning about equality and learning about the importance of language and learning and modelling respect, and respectful relationships — you are more likely to take that home and be able to influence your family and friends,” she said.

“Particularly with men, it is about giving them the tools and confidence that they can intervene or step in or say something.

“I think that historically family violence has always been seen as a private domestic matter that goes on behind closed doors and people have been very, very reluctant to get involved.”

Cr Ashton knows only too well the devastation that family violence can lead to.

“It is an absolute waste of a life — it is the worst form of murder — my sister had been murdered by someone who had been to my house, who had cuddled my babies, had Christmas dinner with us — what a betrayal”.

She says that while most perpetrators of these attacks are male, men should understand that they are part of the solution.

“The majority of men love and respect women, and they want their wives and daughters and sisters to be safe, but men also understand what other men can be like, and so it is very challenging when you are talking to men and they become very defensive.

“But men have to understand it is a real issue — murder is the ultimate form of family violence, but there are heaps of levels that go on underneath that.

“I’ve spoken to women in hospital who are severely damaged, and that is quite a regular occurrence,” she said.

Cr Ashton said police attended family violence incidents in Nillumbik every day, with sexual violence reported weekly, “we must change this”.

She told Council it was worrying that one in three people in Nillumbik did not believe in equal relationships between men and women.

“We must change this,” she reiterated.

“We all know someone who has been affected by domestic violence in the community.

“Preventing violence against women starts with community attitudes, and Council must lead by example.”

During an interview with the Diary, Cr Ashton said” “we can’t just rely on the police to arrest people or lock people away, or the courts to issue intervention orders, they have to try and manage attitudes around violence, and the way we do that is by promoting gender equity, challenging stereotypes and really supporting women to achieve equal outcomes”.

“Things don’t just happen on their own, they don’t just change, you really have to look at everything: from your advertising, when you are interviewing how flexible you can be, because it is alright saying you have equal opportunity, but people aren’t coming off an equal base, women often have breaks to have children, they don’t have a linear career path so we have to be a lot more flexible,” she said.

She said there is still a glass ceiling discouraging women from moving into leadership roles.

“From our politicians, to lack of female CEOs, for some reason there are barriers there to women being in those positions.

“You have to get it into people who are white Anglo-Saxon male: you come with privilege you don’t even know that you have, if you have never been someone who is marginalised or disenfranchised,” she said.

It is not just women who benefit from gender equity, she says there are benefits for everyone from moving away from stereotypes.

“It should take the pressure off about being an alpha male, for men to being able to enjoy their children and being able to enjoy things that are seen as more subtle sensitive, emotive, without any embarrassment.

“To reduce those stereotypes around both men and women frees us all and liberates us all and I definitely think that men have to be comfortable in their own skin too.

“Men that are artistic and creative people should be able to be themselves, whatever their gender or sexual orientation, everyone can contribute to community and be happy,” Cr Ashton said.

She said Nillumbik Council’s initiative in adopting a gender equity policy statement would be reflected in all its internal and external operations.

“That is making sure internally we have got it right and externally with sporting clubs, sporting facilities that we have got it right — that can actually create gender equity for men too — if you build a swimming pool for example, now we are having central family friendly toilets and change rooms, so whether you are male or female you can be with your child and go into a changeroom or a toilet, and that child is safe and with their mother or father”.

Cr Ashton cited the recent murder of Eurydice Dixon in Princes Park, “she had every right to walk home from work — as councillors if we make sure that our parks are well lit and there aren’t bushes hanging over the path — they are small things we can do, we shouldn’t have to do it — but it does help.”

“We have to do the audit on ourselves, make sure we have got things in place.

“We look through everything we do through a gendered lens — we look at everything — how we are building something, funding things,” she told the Diary.

As part of 16 Days of Activism, Nillumbik Council are officially supporting both Victoria against Violence and the global campaign.

This State campaign, now in its third year, involves 16 days of activism from November 25, which is the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women to December 10, International Human Rights Day.

Activities in Nillumbik include a play reading, and Council are taking part in the Christmas Hills Mechanics poetry readings.

Council is putting the message on local garbage trucks to tell every family in Nillumbik that family violence has to stop.

Council is also offering five small grants of $500 each to local groups and businesses to fund activities to raise awareness of violence against women and promote gender equality.

“I really believe in lots of small grants to enable communities to explore ideas themselves, rather than always drive it or hold people’s hands,” said Cr Ashton.

Applications for the grants close on September 21, 2018.

 

Warrandyte Bridgeworks update

As the Diary goes to print, VicRoads announce an extension to this week’s work which involves reducing a section of Yarra Street to one lane with traffic control, works will now take place on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday this week:

Works originally scheduled for completion on Monday 13, Thursday 16 and Friday 17 August 2018 will now be completed on:
Monday 13 August 2018
Tuesday 14 August 2018
Thursday 16 August 2018
Friday 17 August 2018
We apologise for any inconvenience or confusion, however we will need more time, than originally thought, to complete these works safely.

We’re working with Yarra Valley Water to complete some service relocations along Yarra Street as part of the Warrandyte Bridge upgrade.

Yarra Valley Water will be excavating the road surface near the roundabout on Yarra Street to complete these service relocations.

When to expect us

Monday 13, Tuesday 14, Thursday 16 and Friday 17 August 2018

Time: 9:30am – 3:30pm

The impacts during these works include:
Only 1 lane on Yarra Street will be open for both directions of traffic. We’ll have traffic management on site to direct one side through at a time.
Long delays up to 15 minutes are expected on Yarra Street and the Warrandyte Bridge.
Pedestrian access around the area will be impacted during these works. We’ll have a site supervisor on site to assist any pedestrians with disabilities wanting to walk through the works area.
There’ll also be some dust and noise from excavation work on the road surface.
You can access real-time traffic disruption information via VicTraffic

These works may result in service disruptions. Your service provider will contact you if you’ll be impacted.

We thank you for your patience while we work to improve the Warrandyte Bridge for the community.

The Warrandyte Diary will continue to monitor these works and will publish any further updates here.

Can Warrandyte break the plastic habit?

AS THE single-use-plastic bag ban takes hold across the country, the people of Warrandyte are slowly embracing the change to reusable shopping bags.

“People have been really good,” said owner of Quinton’s IGA, Julie Quinton.

According to a survey of IGA cashiers, men have been the loudest complainants as the new system gets underway.

“They need to get organised and remember to bring their reusable bags so they don’t have to pay for a bag,” Julie said.

“Most people are pretty good, and you would hope that they would be after us trying to do it last time and now all the IGAs are doing this.”

Julie said when Coles and Woolworths said they would come on board in phasing out single-use bags, IGA followed suit. IGAs across the country have introduced a thicker reusable bag which cost 15c, along with a range of options for paper and fabric bags.

“Last time people were good when we first introduced it, but as time went on and they kept forgetting the complaints started — but it is more about them getting organised,” she said.

“We have also tried introducing reusable mesh produce bags in the past, but they were all stolen,” she said.

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The Warrandyte Riverside Market Committee spokesperson, Dick Davies says they are very receptive to any proposals to make the market plastic free, “especially offers to help”!

The market committee are encouraging market-goers to bring their own bags along to the market, as well as reusable cups.

Market committee member Greg Rowell told the Diary:

“We cannot control how the stall holders wrap their goods, it is up to market-goers to bring bags if they don’t want plastic”.

When the Diary turned up to the market this month, there was a large proportion of shoppers who had come with their own bags.

“Another major issue is coffee cups which are not fully biodegradable — people can bring their own of course,” said Dick.

“We have planned to have reusable mugs provided on stations at each end of the market but we did not get enough volunteers to run it,” he said.

Dick said that replacing stallholder’s plastic bags and containers comes at a cost, “which we are considering in conjunction with Council and other Manningham markets”.

The market would welcome members of the community to help out with their green initiatives.

“The onus of implementation should not fall on the committee of management who are all volunteers and working flat out as it is.

“Residents should bring their own bags and we need younger people who are concerned to come forward and help,” he said.

The ban on single-use plastics will hopefully go a small way to reducing society’s addiction to plastic and reduce the amount of waste that ends up in our oceans.

Have you found ways of living with less plastic in your life? Contact the Diary to share your innovative ideas of how to live without plastic: editor@warrandytediary.com.au

Saving Georgia

UPDATED (17.7.2018)

Kangaroo shot with an arrow returns home

GEORGIA the kangaroo, who was rescued last month after being shot by an arrow, has now been reunited with to her family in North Warrandyte.

Wildlife carer, Manfred Zabinskas oversaw Georgia’s rehabilitation for almost a month before returning her and her joey to their Bradleys Lane home range.

“She has other young ones here and her joey will be able to join its siblings, this is home for her, this is where she belongs,” he said.

Manfred said she coped very well during her month-long convalescence and is pleased she has made a 100 per cent recovery.

“Seeing her recover so calmly and to start eating grass and hop with reasonable composure was just a massive relief.

“It is always great to save an animal that needs care, but it seems so much more important when they have been victims of abuse and cruelty like that,” he said.

Police are still keen to hear from anyone with information that can lead to the arrest of the perpetrator.

“Someone knows how this has happened, and you will be shocked to see how often this does occur on our wildlife,” said Manfred.

Please call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 if you can assist.

To learn more about Manfred’s work with wildlife to donate to his wildlife shelter: fivefreedoms.com.au

Saving Georgia

A HORRIFYING thing happened in North Warrandyte in mid-May.

A young kangaroo with a joey in her pouch was cruelly shot by an arrow, left to wander the riverbank with a target-shooting arrow lodged in her back.

The community rallied to rescue the injured roo when she was spotted in a Bradleys Lane backyard sporting her unwanted accessory.

Residents alerted local wildlife carers, and the rescue effort, coordinated by Libby Annand and Liz McNeil began.

Liz and Libby arranged for a specialist volunteer wildlife carer, Manfred Zabinskas to capture the injured animal.

After a two-hour drive from Trentham, two attempts and several hours of patient waiting, Manfred was able to administer a tranquiliser dart and take the kangaroo to the vet for surgery.

Dr James Taylor, assisted by Robyn Ireland, performed the life-saving procedure at the Box Hill Veterinary Hospital, with the vets giving their services free of charge for native animals.

“She ended up having a worse injury than we had thought, at first we thought that the arrow had just gone in under the skin,” Manfred told the Diary.

After they removed the arrow they discovered she had a deep infection and necrotic tissue and realised the arrow had been in there more than a week.

“She had to have quite substantial surgery, and the vet had to do some serious stitching work, so the wound site is quite substantial now — there is quite a bit to heal — but it will heal a lot better now that the vet has removed all of the affected tissue,” he said.

“It is almost impossible to get on top of an infection with antibiotics but if you get rid of all of the infected tissue and just prevent further infection it is a lot more successful.”

What they also discovered was that she had a little joey in her pouch.

“A little pinkie around two months old, that is very small, its eyes aren’t open and its ears aren’t up or anything yet.

“The joey couldn’t survive out of mum’s pouch, so if something happened and she didn’t make it then the joey would be lost as well,” said Manfred.

The veterinary team were also pleased the arrow did not hit anything vital, missing the spinal column and organs.

“It is good that we got her when we did so that we could save her — in many of the arrow attacks, they do die after surgery because of the nature of the wound — it would be wonderful to save her after she has gone through such a horrible experience,” Manfred said.

The kangaroo, given the name Georgia, settled in well to Manfred’s wildlife shelter, Five Freedoms Animal Rescue, spending the next two weeks receiving care and medication from Manfred and his wife, Helen.

The shelter is a labour of love for the pair.

Like all wildlife rescuers, the care of the animals is paid for out of their own pockets, including medication, tranquilisers, food, and not to mention the extensive hours that go into rehabilitation.

“I’ve been a shelter owner and operator for 30 years, we are volunteer rescuers, so I make myself available around the clock to respond to animals hit by cars.

“I used to be an engineer, but I also now operate my own commercial animal business which is my entire source of income — getting possums out of buildings, snake catching… all of the work I do is related to animal rescue work,” he said.

Helen Zabinskas added: “there is no government funding, there is no department that does it — it is all the work of volunteers”.

If the government get their way, the fate of any future injured eastern grey kangaroos could be very different.

A recent discussion paper from the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) signalled  they are seeking to ban wildlife carers from rescuing eastern grey kangaroos, wombats, possums and cockatoos.

The recently released Authority to Control Wildlife (ATCW) system review Discussion Paper states:

“Wildlife shelters and foster carers invest significant time and resources rehabilitating sick, injured and orphaned eastern grey kangaroos.

Given that the species is overabundant in many areas and is the species that the majority of ATCWs are issued for, some members of the community have suggested that the species should not be able to be rehabilitated under the wildlife shelter system… it may also be appropriate to consider whether the rehabilitation of unprotected wildlife, such as wombats, cockatoos or possums, should be disallowed or restricted to areas where such wildlife is not over-abundant.”

Helen Zabinskas told the Diary, “It is absolutely shocking, it is going to lead to widespread animal suffering and human trauma.

“They say they want to free up shelter resource and money by stopping us rescuing and rehabilitating these animals which is pretty bloody cheeky when it is not their money.”

In a recent interview with The Sydney Morning Herald, Manfred said he would face legal consequences if necessary:

“I will go to jail before I stop looking after animals that need help, and I think you’ll find there are quite a few hundred people out there who will say exactly the same thing.”

The proposed ban would be in place, even for acts of human cruelty such as this arrow attack.

And sadly, these incidents are not uncommon, even in Warrandyte.

Sergeant Stewart Henderson, Officer in Charge of Warrandyte Police Station said that there have been quite a few incidents over the last few years.

“It is hard to say at this stage whether it is kids being kids or people actually coming out to hunt them, but unfortunately it seems to be popping up,” he said.

“About three years ago we had a whole bunch of slaughtered kangaroos dumped in the dumpster at the car wash and around that time we found a beheaded kangaroo on someone’s property… I can’t understand what possesses people to be so cruel.

“Had we not been able to find her, she would have just gone around getting sicker and sicker, the joey would have kept growing and eventually the pair of them would have died from infection in a slow miserable way,” he said.

“It is illegal to hunt them and if they were caught they would be charged with cruelty to animals,” Sgt Henderson said.

Sgt Henderson said Police are looking for information on anyone hunting illegally.

“If people do see people on their property, at the time phone 000 so we can come out and speak to people and identify them, but if they have other information, if they don’t need police attendance, call Crime Stoppers, you can do it online or anonymously with information such as registration numbers,” he said.

Manfred told the Diary, “People are always astounded at how many times I do go out to these sort of incidents, I don’t think a year goes by when I am not rescuing or knowing of some kangaroos that have been shot with bows and arrows or with crossbow bolts.

“It is quite regular,” he said.

Wildlife carers have been calling for a crackdown on illegal wildlife hunting.

“There has been no work whatsoever to try to address the situation, it is pretty serious.

“Aside from the fact it is an horrific thing, it is completely illegal and horribly cruel to the animals, this was in the middle of Warrandyte.

“These kangaroos don’t move far, they are a known little family of kangaroos, they pretty much live in the backyards along Bradleys Lane and down to the river.

“This has happened in a very populated area.

“There are people that are happy to fire off arrows at wildlife, not only doing the wrong thing by attacking protected animals, but killing them in an environment where people are around all the time,” Manfred said.

In true Warrandyte form, in an open letter sent to the Diary, a resident of Bradleys Lane has given a warning to the perpetrators of this incident:

“To the big brave hunter who took to the terrifying wilds of Bradleys Lane with your bow and arrow.
You must be so proud of your heroic endeavours injuring a mother kangaroo in what I’m sure was such an even fight.
If I ever see you in my backyard with your toy hunting gear, I’ll invite my resident big buck kangaroo to sneak up on your unsuspecting arse and see who wins that battle.”

President,
Bradleys Lane Chapter of North Warrandyte Residents against Meaningless Acts of Cowardice

Manfred plans to release Georgia back with her mob in Bradleys Lane.

“She has got family there.

“There is a large male that is part of her family group, there are some younger ones, may even be other joeys of hers that were nearby.

“She has her own definite family there that she lives with and they go from yard to yard, the neighbours all love having them there and cherish having the wildlife in their backyard.

“We certainly want to get her back there.”

If you have any information regarding this or other acts of animal cruelty, contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

If anyone would like to donate to Manfred’s Five Freedoms Animal Rescue Shelter, to help offset the cost of Georgia’s care, deposits can be made to:

Five Freedoms Animal Rescue
Bank: NAB
BSB: 083-515
Account No. 8133 33160
Cheques can be posted to:
Box 575 Woodend Vic 3442

Photos by Libby Annand & Manfred Zabinskas

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