Monthly Archives: May 2017

Templestowe win the tussle

Templestowe won over Warrandyte in the annual STOP. One Punch Can Kill cup, with both Reserve and Senior outfits winning comprehensively.

STOP. One Punch Can Kill, an organization founded in 2013 by Caterina Politi after the tragic death of her son, David Cassai (a member of both the Warrandyte and Templestowe communities), is dedicated to teaching others the dangers of violence.

Both Warrandyte and Templestowe football clubs have been avid supporters of the cause, and changed the name of the Yarra Cup Challenge match to the STOP. One Punch Can Kill Cup in 2016 to further lend their hand to the organization.

Reserves

The Reserves struggled early in the game, kicking just the one major in the opening quarter.

Zac Ratcliffe continued his good form, constantly attacking the ball, but Warrandyte couldn’t manage to create clear-cut forward chances.

However, Warrandyte’s defence held firm, managing to restrict Templestowe well throughout the first half, and holding the margin to just 19 points at the major break.

Unfortunately, Josh Huntly sustained a broken arm in the second quarter, an injury that will see him spend a significant amount of time on the sideline.

The Bloods started the third term with great purpose, peppering the goals and generally running over Templestowe.

Sadly, Warrandyte would rue missed opportunities in front of goal to bring the game within reach, and despite only trailing by 16 points at three quarter time, fell by over eight goals at the final siren 3.7 25 to 12.5 77.

Seniors

The Senior side mirrored the Reserves early in the game, finishing the first quarter without recording a score while Templestowe piled on five goals.

In the second term Warrandyte managed to click into gear, with young star David Wilson kicking two terrific majors to ignite the Bloods.

Former Templestowe player Michael Cullum also managed to get one on the board as Warrandyte continued the charge, outscoring Templestowe for the quarter to trail by 29 points at the half.

Throughout the second half, emotion began to get the better of a few players out on the park, but both sides settled down to continue a decent second half of footy.

The Bloods, in particular Cullum, Troy Ratcliffe and Wilson, fought bravely throughout the third and fourth term, with Cullum adding another major.

Sadly, the Bloods were unable to make any real inroads on the margin, with Templestowe continuing to pick apart the defence to score when necessary.

When the final siren sounded, the Bloods trailed by 42 points, 7.10 52 to 14.10 94.

The Bloods face off against fierce rivals Ringwood in their next fixture – again at Warrandyte Reserve – and will look to secure a vital victory.

Despite a less than ideal result, the club can take away that STOP. One Punch Can Kill’s message about the dangers one punch can do was delivered.

Photo sourced from Warrandyte Football Club Facebook page

 

Gardening as an art form

A rusty bucket of daffodils, a vintage copper insert filled with water and waterlilies, or an old turquoise bowling ball nestled amongst the arctosis.

Garden art can cost you anything from the petrol it takes to drive around checking out garage sales to thousands of dollars spent at a gallery or nursery.

“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” is a common quote but nothing is more true than what people see as “art” in the Warrandyte Garden.

Rust lends itself perfectly to the Australian bush backdrop that our properties are surrounded by.

Gums, bursarias, wattles, native grasses and shrubs all huddling around an old piece of metal, the natural tones of the setting sun on gum leaves compliment the brown, orange and black tones of the rusted metal making it a natural addition to the garden.

Looking at the garden art entries at the Melbourne Garden Show this year gives you some ideas of how we can adorn our gardens.

From mosaics, to carved limestone blocks, the barbed wire balls, to plastic chairs painted with zebra stripes burrowing into the ground.

Swimming pools, fish and frog ponds show reflections of the trees above and the autumn leaves floating on the surface add tranquillity to the scene (except for the pool boy/girl who swears at the inconvenience of having to scoop them out).

The rusted barb wire fences bordering properties give us a sense of days gone by but rolled into balls become “art” with a $100 plus price tag.

Rusty fire pits are all the rage and now is the perfect time to invest in one.

A fire and a glass of wine in the garden in the evening is one of life simple joys.

Cane baskets, gum boots, kettles, fire grates, buckets, baking tins, all become receptacles for bulbs and succulents.

Allowing art to spill down stairs, to be clustered under trees in a huddled group waiting out the winter when they will then burst forth into floral tributes.

Water features add the element of movement and noise to a garden or courtyard echoing the sounds of the Yarra river, a drawcard for birds, bees, insects and frogs to your garden.

Vintage gates that lead to nowhere nestled at the bottom of the garden and used as trellis in vegetables gardens, long sticks tied together to form tee pees for climbing beans and peas, tomato frames in jaunty colours in clusters, old screen doors with the wire stripped out leaning against walls — all are the perfect frameworks to hide an eyesore in the garden, to create the illusion of depth or make the garden feel bigger and more interesting, to divide the garden into rooms or to add height to the newly planted garden.

So remember to find original pieces, try not to buy the commonplace “art” but think outside the box and see what you come up with.

Garden benches, garden chairs, hammocks or a simple swing invite visitors to sit a while in the garden, to contemplate the plants, smells and sounds, to be a child again.

Now is the time to look out for environmental weeds.

These include agapanthus, asparagus fern, bluebell creeper, cape broom (Genista), Cootamundra wattle, cotoneaster, English ivy, holly, weeping willow, Japanese honeysuckle, pampas grass, and Spanish heath to name a few.

They spread too easily by seed and cause destruction in bushland and forested areas by smothering native plants.

Autumn and winter is a time to flick through gardening books and think of other alternatives for these plants in the garden.

Plant evergreen trees in May. the soil is warm and with the autumn rains we have been having the soil is moist and easy to turn over.

Evergreen trees can be planted now acacias species, eucalypts, jacaranda, malaleuca, peppercorns, camellias, michelias.

Remember a hole dug to plant a tree should be at least twice the size of the root ball.

Don’t be stingy when digging a hole, never try to jam the trees roots in a hole that is too small especially when you have purchased bare rooted trees.

Remove the plant from the pot and gently tease out the roots, place a hand full of slow release fertiliser in the hole a, place the tree in the hole and replace the soil making sure the soil is good quality.

With feet or hands firm down the soil around the plant and water deeply. Make sure you mulch to help conserve moisture in the soil.

To avoid “collar rot” make sure the mulch is not resting up against the trunk of the tree.

If you are planting kangaroo paws remember they like to be planted in a mound slightly above the ground to ensure perfect drainage.

If you want to be happy for a lifetime — be a gardener.

Junior Bloods’ name leaders

THE Warrandyte Junior football club have announced their leadership group for 2017, naming Ben Dickson as skipper to lead the side this season.

Selected by the Colts coaching staff, fellow players and the committee, Dickson will be supported by vice captains Jack VanDerRee and Leo Garrick.

Dickson was also the recipient of the Ben McKellar perpetual shield, in honour of former Colt Ben McKellar, who was captain in 1998 but unable to play out the season after contracting leukaemia, tragically passing away in 1999.

During the interview process all three players displayed qualities that epitomise the values the Junior football club wishes to display — a strong sense of community, equality, and feeling of belonging.

All three have played their younger years of football at the club and are leading by example, getting involved with AusKick, the Senior side and other teams.

During the season, the trio will also be charged with organizing a community event.

MDD awareness month

MAY is Metabolic Dietary Disorders awareness month and Warrandyte’s own Grand Hotel have announced a very special program — in what is believed to be a world first; they are offering a special menu to cater for people living with this rare group of diseases.

The Warrandyte Diary spoke with the President of the Metabolic Dietary Disorders Association (MDDA) about the most common of this rare disorder Phenylketonuria (PKU) and what this menu initiative means for people living with PKU.

What is it like living with PKU?

Phenylketonuria is considered a rare disease and I guess the significance of this disease is it is one of the things they pick up with the heal prick test.

The heal prick test has been administered for about 50 years and most newborn babies are tested, so PKU is usually diagnosed within the first ten days of life.

My son is seven and he’s got PKU — when he was diagnosed, I had never heard of it before and it came as quite a shock.

However, as a parent you learn — over time —it is a manageable disease as long as you are diagnosed early, are on top of it, and you teach your child as they are growing into a teenager and an adult.

They live a relatively normal healthy life — the biggest challenge is the diet, because it is all about your metabolism.

What are the symptoms and restrictions?

To have PKU means you have got a faulty enzyme in your liver that prevents you from metabolising a particular amino acid which is found in protein — Phenylalanine.

It can’t be metabolised and therefore creates toxic levels in your body which effect the brain — so a young child, if they are not diagnosed early, just simply breastfeeding is getting more  Phenylalanine than they need.

It sends their levels sky high and potentially within 6-12 months, they are brain damaged, so it is all about avoiding brain damage.

When they are young that is when it is most critical, as they get older their brain gets to a point where it is considered to be developed, which they now say doesn’t happen until they are 25, but they advocate diet for life to protect the brain for life so what that means it they have to have a very strict low protein diet.

My son Charlie is allowed to have 12 grams of protein, kids his age with a metabolism his age would probably have about 40 grams, that doesn’t sound too bad because he is a child, but as he gets older that 12 grams won’t change, most adults will have around 70 grams of protein a day.

For example, an egg is six grams or a glass of milk is 10 grams of protein, a potato is two grams, so it is fruit and vegetable as well — everything has protein in it, even nuts legumes soy; we have to avoid all those things too because they are too high in protein, so what we have to counteract this is a specialised synthesised protein, it is like a protein shake — Charlie will have that three times a day and that gives him all of the other protein amino acids his diets is missing out on.

We also have special protein free rice, pasta, milk, cereals, cheese, the whole lot to make up a lot of the staples of the diet and then depending on what their actual allowance is we will incorporate normal foods in to their diet — I am always to the supermarket now reading labels.

It is a very complex diet and because it is not an allergy, or something like diabetes, it doesn’t have that instant effect so it is very hard for people to understand. oIt doesn’t really fit into any category of special diet either, people say, oh you are just vegan — and then they will bring you out a vegan meal with all these sesame seeds or lentils or something.

So what happens is people with PKU often don’t dine out because it is too hard to explain and prepare a meal and so most places you go generally the staple they have is hot chips, but we generally have to weigh them, because one potato is two grams of protein so if someone is going out trying to find a two gram meal for their kid they have to weigh them and they say: Charlie you can have that many — so it is tough.

 The Grand Hotel are doing a special PKU menu, how important is that?

With dining out, a lot of people say it’s just too hard so they take their food everywhere and they often eat the same bland stuff, that is the other sad thing they have their special free pasta they boil it up they put a bit of their free cheese they might sprinkle some herbs on top, you think how much food is a part of our lives and it so bland – even drinking — I mean beer has protein so to even go and have some beers with your mates, to have that social aspect, for families with kids and teenagers and for adults to be able to come out and have that dining experience and just eat some beautiful foods.

What it will mean is that families that are in the area can come and have a dining experience with their kids or as adults and actually be able to order something off a menu without having to explain it — it is just brilliant to be able to eat something and feel like everyone else.

Locals outraged over “unnecessary” VicRoads safety barriers

KANGAROO GROUND locals are outraged over a 17km stretch of road safety barriers VicRoads are currently constructing on Kangaroo Ground – St Andrews Road.

According to VicRoads, the project will benefit the community by increasing road safety and preventing high-speed collisions.

The Victorian Government has provided $6.2 million to the project.

But many locals, including Nillumbik Councillor for Sugarloaf Ward Jane Ashton, believe the project is a waste of taxpayer’s money.

“It really is an over-engineered mess in the middle of our beautiful green wedge,” she said.

While Ms Ashton is in favour of making local roads safer, she, and many other locals, are questioning VicRoads’ methods.

“The VicRoads’ data shows that speed reduction has far greater cost benefit than barriers,” Ms Ashton said.

Also worrying locals is the fact that VicRoads have built a section of the barriers near a major kangaroo crossing.

Kangaroo Ground resident Lia Williams says, “It is upsetting to see dead kangaroos on the road outside my property, slaughtered between the newly erected barriers”.

The barriers could also prevent local firefighters from entering properties during an emergency.

“We live in a very high-risk fire area; a barrier is going to block you into your own property. It restricts firefighters’ access and puts all of us in more danger,” Ms Williams said.

Another major concern for the locals and drivers is the safety of cyclists. Up to 500 cyclists travel along Kangaroo Ground – St Andrews Road each weekend.

“Cyclists [are] being forced along even narrower sections of rough road,” Councillor Ashton said.

Ms Williams believes the barriers are a quick-fix solution.

“Many cyclists use this road up to Kinglake. It is a really narrow road as it is, they should have used the money for cycling lanes. What they are doing is a blanket approach — put barriers where they are needed, not just on straight stretches of road because there are trees.”

Locals voiced their disapproval of the project with ongoing protests during April, with up to 40 attending some rallies.

The protestors have been gathering support through a petition and by passing leaflets to drivers as they stop at the road works.

“We have had a rolling group of protestors nearly every day for three weeks; many people have written to the Premier, their local MPs and VicRoads, but few have had their letters acknowledged,” Councillor Ashton said.

“Nillumbik Council has also written to VicRoads asking them to cease work and re-engage with the community.

“This is really a David and Goliath battle, with VicRoads ploughing on as quickly as possible,” she said.

The residents are frustrated that VicRoads have taken little notice of their disapproval and ignored the local community’s ideas.

“The community suggested improving road shoulders, particularly for cyclists, fixing up road surfaces, creating safer turnouts from Yarra Glen and Wattle Glen Roads onto Kangaroo Ground Road, and additional speed reductions,” Councillor Ashton says.

“For VicRoads it was community consultation but for us it wasn’t — we were ignored,” Ms Williams added.

Ms Williams believes a major issue in VicRoads’ assessment of the area is the fact there have been no fatalities for many years.

“There have been 11 accidents in the past eight years with no fatalities on the Kangaroo Ground – St Andrews Road in the statistics that we have [from VicRoads], yet Kangaroo Ground – Warrandyte Road has had 23 accidents in the past four years. VicRoads are doing nothing to improve that road,” Ms Williams said.

Local resident George Bernard agreed.

“I’m a local firefighter and I can’t remember the last time I’ve come to a serious accident [on the road] with fatalities or people having to be hospitalised,” he said.

VicRoads data confirmed that there had been zero fatalities on Kangaroo Ground – St Andrews Road since January 1 2006, while on Kangaroo Ground – Warrandyte Road there had been three fatalities.

The VicRoads barriers are being constructed throughout May, and are expected to be completed in June.