Monthly Archives: March 2017

Warrandyte’s double delight

Warrandyte Cricket Club have had a highly successful end to season 2016/17 with their Fourth XI team and Under 14s junior team winning their respective RDCA Premierships.

In back to back games at the Warrandyte Cricket Ground, the Under 14s started off the successful weekend for Warrandyte with a five-wicket win.

Alan L. Reidy Shield

The Under 14s won the Alan L. Reidy Shield after being asked to bowl first against St Andrews at home.

Chris Rakuscek, coming off a season splitting his skills between junior and senior cricket, got the wickets tumbling early, taking two top order wickets to have St Andrews reeling.

Rakuscek (4/23) and Brady Poole (2/16) opened the bowling strongly, with Tom Jackson (2/18) and Lachie Haberfield (2/22) taking the remaining wickets on day one of the final, to dismiss the opposition within 33.2 overs and give their team a total of 108 to chase for the title.

Warrandyte capably chased down the total with Ethan Ward (13) retiring off his 50 balls at the top of the order while the middle order capably chased the total down around him.

Warrandyte batted exceptionally well in partnerships to make quick work of the runs, with Poole (43) guiding the run chase home with some smooth hitting, before Jackson (11) hit the winning boundary to give the juniors win.

The flag tops off a great season for the junior program, with Poole becoming one of the youngest players in club history to play First Eleven Senior Cricket, and many team members making their senior cricket debut.

Neil Tull Shield

Following the big juniors win, the Fourth XI hosted Heathmont Baptist to complete for the Neil Tull Shield also at the Warrandyte Cricket Ground.

Warrandyte faced Heathmont for the fifth time this season, having beaten them successfully all season, including in the Qualifying Finals where they arguably at their tightest hit out of the season.

After captain Dean Gidley won the toss and elected to bat, Warrandyte faced some tight early bowling before losing both openers, Goddard (10) and Molyneux (9) in tight procession before the first drinks break.

James Weatherley (32) combined with Daniel Wellesley (105) with an excellent partnership to put Warrandyte back into a leading position, before Wellesley would go on to play what would be a match winning innings.

Wellesley, joined by Brett Kline (34), Ison (16), Gidley (22) and Prangley (14), would escalate the run scoring following the lunch break on day one, with some late hitting ensuring Warrandyte finished with a highly competitive 8/250 from their 70 overs in front of a large, vocal home crowd.

Wellesley’s century will long stand as one of the greater innings seen at the Warrandyte Cricket Ground, with his control and speed of bat impressing all that watched.

A confident Warrandyte returned the next day to finish the job, but knew they faced an on form top order from Heathmont.

Heathmont’s opening partnership sent nerves through the Warrandyte camp with an opening stand of 44.

However, Ison would take the crucial opening wicket and from there an essential procession occurred.

Stephen Warr toiled away from the IGA end of the ground for 16 overs throughout the day, taking a crucial wicket in the Heathmont middle order, combined with some persistent line and length from Prangley.

Ison was matched with his excellent form with the ball by captain Gidley, who finished with the figures of 4/35 including three wickets in tight order following the lunch break.

By the time Daniel Woodhead took the final wicket, caught behind by Goddard, Warrandyte would win by 80 runs and knew they had the flag in the bag.

The win marks two premiership flags for captain Gidley, but the first for club lifetime member Stephen Goddard, who after 25 years of playing at the WCC will savour the weekend’s event for a while.

Road closures for Festival Parade

Warrandyte Police have issued a reminder about road closures during Saturday morning’s Festival Parade down Yarra Street.

Sergeant Stewart Henderson advised residents and visitors that Yarra Street will be closed between Kangaroo Ground Road and Harris Gully Road for the duration of the parade (1100-1200) however police traffic blocks will be in place 10 minutes prior to this.

“All side streets off Yarra Street will be barricaded for the duration of the parade and manned by emergency management personnel to prevent vehicles turning into Yarra Street and there will be reduced access across the bridge for about 10 – 15 mins as the floats and other vehicles exit Tills Road and head West along Yarra Street,” he said.

All Southbound traffic crossing the bridge during the parade will be turned East towards Ringwood, with West bound traffic along Ringwood-Warrandyte Road diverted along Falconer Street and only those vehicles going to Wonga Park and Croydon Road will be able to get through.

Police will be setting up a traffic management point at Jumping Creek Road and Ringwood Warrandyte Road where Wonga Park bound traffic can turn right but no traffic will be allowed to continue on towards Warrandyte.

“We recommend traffic travelling from Ringwood towards Warrandyte are encouraged to turn left at Falconer Road to avoid being turned around at Jumping Creek Road,” Sgt Henderson said.

For those parents dropping children off for the parade he suggested: “arrive early as there will be limited parking along Yarra Street and once the Roadblocks are in place no vehicles will be allowed through.”

Additionally, Stiggant Street will be closed to traffic for the entire weekend with the exception of residents, emergency services, St Stephen’s church attendees, 2017 Parking Permit holders and vehicles with an accessibility parking permit, while Police Street will be closed on Sunday morning during the Billy Cart Derby.

2017 Festival Walkthrough

WARRANDYTE’S biggest weekend is coming your way March 24, 25 and 26. This year, Warrandyte Festival honours 40 years of community celebration. It is time, lovers of ‘70s rock, to fish out your flairs and party like it’s 1977! The best in home-grown, family fun, Cherie Moselen walks you through the festival that has it all.

BATTLE OF THE BANDS

From 6pm on Friday March 24, local youth bands battle it out at Stiggants Reserve for the top prize: a day in a recording studio.

Headlining the event is last year’s battle winner, Cardinia. Soft drink, water and a Scouts’ sausage sizzle will be available on the night for cash purchase only. This is a drug, smoke and alcohol free event. Admission is FREE.

ART

Enjoy Warrandyte/Donvale Rotary’s 33rd exhibition of artwork by local and interstate artists. Preview the art and join in the festivities at the Gala Champagne Opening from 7pm – 10pm on Friday March 24, at the Warrandyte Community Church in Yarra Street. A gala ticket costs $25. Weekend viewing extends from 9am – 5pm on Saturday and 10am – 4pm on Sunday. A $5 ticket includes a catalogue. Entry is free for children and senior students.

THE LOUNGE BY NIGHT

Film lovers—don’t miss out! The Warrandyte Film Feast makes its debut at The Lounge on the lower riverbank of Stiggants Reserve on Friday March 24. Sixteen short films from different genres will be screened, including Apprentice of the Year, starring Shane Jacobson, and locally made film, Heed, among others. MC for the evening is Australian actor Daniel Schepisi. Fabulous food and drink can be purchased from 6pm; the first film starts at 8pm. A ticket costs $10. Book online at www.trybooking.com/OPEG. NOTE: Films are not classified and some content may offend.

THE LOUNGE BY DAY

String Band music will entertain Lounge audiences from 12pm – 5pm on Saturday. See authentic old-time Cajun band Iron Gob String Band, the Stetson Family, Honeyfields and the Strzelecki Stringbusters. On Sunday, check out the Funky Monkeys circus band from noon, followed by a Sanctum Theatre presentation of Otto Learns to Fly—an interactive children’s puppet show. Ukuleles and hula hoops also come out to play. And it is all for FREE!

 GRAND PARADE

This year, four parade monarchs have been chosen to honour the festival’s origins. Donning royal regalia are festival pioneers Yvonne Reid, Howard Geldard, Patrick Nuzum and Tim Ferguson. The procession makes its way from the Mechanics’ Institute in Yarra Street to Stiggants Reserve on Saturday March 25 after official kick-off at 11am. Community groups, schools, sports clubs, vintage cars, a vintage flyover and fabulous floats—that’s Warrandyte on parade. Incredible!

MAIN STAGE MUSIC

Music starts at midday with local school and bush bands and continues with quality acts Mango Retreat, Dannika, The Teskey Brothers and The Scrims, among others. Sunday’s programme features a variety of talent from 11.00am. A festival favourite for 20 years, acclaimed bush band Paradiddle will rouse the crowd at 3pm, followed by The April Family, The Weeping Willows and Aleyce Simmonds. Lovers of ‘70s rock—don’t miss Mother! While Nudist Funk Orchestra is closing the show! Bring seating and a picnic, or buy food and drink across the weekend.

RIVERBANK STAGE

Children’s entertainer Keeping the Beat brings noonday fun on Saturday, followed by a diverse musical line-up including Fulton Street, Watercolour and Sideglance. Get your tango on by the banks of the Yarra from 7pm Saturday. Enjoy a dance class, special show from Sidewalk Tango’s Performance Troupe and two hours of “Milonga”! Sunday’s programme will please animal lovers with everyone’s favourite Pet Parade at 9:30am and Wildlife Exposure on at 11:15am. Music lovers stick around also, to see Beautiful Beasts, Real Love and Warrandyte’s own Mia Hamilton.

COMMUNITY BUS

An all-access bus service returns to the festival this year. Provided by Nillumbik Council, this community bus has full wheel chair accessibility. It will run every 15 minutes, stopping at the Warrandyte Sports Club carpark; at the top of Stiggants Reserve; at the bottom of Stiggant Street and opposite the Community Centre. The bus will operate from 11:30am – 5pm on Saturday and 9am – 5pm on Sunday.

 SCOUTS’ WATERSLIDE

BYO bathers and towel (change tent available) and get ready to slip and slide downhill at Stiggants Reserve. Hosted by Warrandyte/Park Orchards Scout Group. Charges apply. It is giant. It is awesome!

BILLY CARTS

Have you got the steel to join the billycart hall of fame? Wheels line up at the top of Police Street from Sunday 9:30am. Registration of $8 takes place between 8:30am – 9:15am for children aged eight to 15 years. The event features a parents’ race, trophies and great prizes. Carts MUST meet strict safety criteria. For enquiries call 0418 357 282 or go to the website: www. warrandytefestival.org.

DUCK RACE

Duck down to the river at 2:30pm on Sunday to watch 1,000 plastic duckies take the plunge. The first to float downriver from Police Street to Stiggant Street wins the trophy. Ducks can be prior-purchased for $3 from local schools, or during festival weekend from the Information Caravan.

DISPLAYS

Discover a range of opportunities through local groups and service providers, including: Aboriginal art exhibition, Animals on the Move, Be Ready Warrandyte, Combined Emergency Services, Eltham Steam and Stationary Engine Preservation Society, Friends of Warrandyte State Park, Manningham City Council, Middle Yarra Landcare Group, Reconciliation Manningham, Warrandyte Community Association, Warrandyte Community Garden, Warrandyte Toy Library, plus miners, blacksmiths, woodcrafters, reptiles, and solar/electric bikes.

NATURE’S PLAYGROUND

Directed by local arts therapist Tania Virgona and supported by Manningham Council, this activity encourages children to collectively create artistic instalments such as cubbies, nests and sculptures as influenced by local flora and Indigenous heritage. Nature Play runs from 12:00pm – 4pm on Sunday only.

FOLLIES

Written and directed by Warrandyte Theatre Company members, Open Book Follies is a romp of comic sketches and musical numbers. Performance dates for 2017 are: March 23, 24, 25, 30, 31 and April 1, 6, 7 and 8. A ticket costs $25 (concession $20). BYO food and drink. Showtime is 7.30 for 8pm at the Mechanics Institute Hall. Book online at www.warrandytehallarts.asn.au

GRAND READ

This year marks the Grand Read’s 20th evening of presenting quality readings from local poets and writers. The feature guest for 2017 is Arnold Zable, an award winning Australian writer, storyteller, educator and human rights advocate whose writing focuses primarily on migrant experience. Warrandyte’s literary showcase takes place upstairs at the Grand Hotel at 7:30pm on Tuesday March 28. A ticket costs $20 (Concession $16) and includes a light supper. For catering purposes, please purchase in advance from Warrandyte Neighbourhood House on 9844 1839. Or visit the website: www.warrandyteneighbourhoodhouse.org.au

Check out www.warrandytefestival.org for information including: road closures, programme details, accessibility info, maps and registration forms. Facebookers can search “Warrandyte Festival” for regular weekend updates.

Pick up or download the March edition of the Warrandyte Dairy for your four-page pull-out of the 2017 Warrandyte Festival.

Fire danger period to end south of the river

The CFA have declared the fire danger period for District 13 will finish at 1am on March 20, this includes Knox, Manningham, Maroondah, and Yarra Ranges Council areas.

CFA Operations Manager Dave Renkin urges people to remember to adhere to local council regulations, and to register their burn-offs.

“Calls to unregistered burn-offs take volunteer firefighters away from workplaces, families and potentially genuine emergencies,” he said.

Given Nillumbik still has fire restrictions in place, taking the necessary precautions when planning to burn-off will allow the fire authorities to react efficiently to all fire calls.

“If you haven’t registered your burn you can expect some disgruntled fireys arriving at your property asking you to ‘please explain’,” Mr Renkin said.

Keep your burn off safe and legal:

  • Check fire restrictions in your area and always register your burn.
  • Check and monitor weather conditions — particularly wind.
  • Warn your neighbours beforehand that there will be smoke in the air.
  • Stay in attendance the whole time your burn is going.
  • Have sufficient equipment and water to stop the fire spreading.

Landowners can register their burn-off with the Emergency Services Telecommunications Authority (ESTA) by calling 1800 668 511 or emailing burnoffs@esta.vic.gov.au

Photo: Stephen Reynolds

Family talent Poole runs deep

 

Most families are proud to boast just one child playing high-level sport at a young age. Other families, such as the Pooles, are lucky enough to possess three. Brothers Brady (13), Darcy (16) and Jack (19) have established themselves as cornerstone members of Warrandyte’s cricket program, all playing roles in the First and Second XI for the Bloods.

The trio recently reached significant milestones within the local cricketing landscape for different reasons.

The brothers were first the talk of the town when they were all named to play together for the Second XI at the beginning of the season, before Brady made further waves when he became the youngest player in club history to run out for the Firsts aged just 13.

“We started off the year in the Twos – at the start of the season Dad said there was a huge announcement about it at the team selection – it was a big surprise that Brady was playing Twos because he played Sixes last year, and it was a really big deal that we played on the same side because we play so much cricket here in the backyard. It’s really great playing with each other,” said Darcy Poole.

After all playing together for the Second XI, Brady was eventually named in the Firsts, an honor that wasn’t lost on the young all-rounder.

“It was a big deal – I didn’t really expect it to be honest – certainly at the start of the season I didn’t expect to; just to be playing with people who have played at a good level of cricket, a level I want to play at when I’m older it’s a big deal to me.

“It’s different, there’s more persistent play.

“You play against some really good players who have had good careers in cricket and then come back down to a local level — it’s not too huge a jump from the Seconds, but it’s noticeable,” Brady says.

One of the major benefits of playing up the order for the boys has been the opportunity to play and work with club coach Jake Sherriff, which both brothers consider a massive benefit.

“When I first played with him that was one of the biggest things, playing with someone who has played district cricket; but even last year when I was in the Sixes, which is the lowest division, he was still coming down and telling me how to improve my game,” Brady said.

The family’s progression is made more remarkable when you consider just how young they are and how much experience they lack.

Both Darcy and Brady have just four years of cricket under their belt, and even less senior cricket exposure.

Despite this, both players are logging strong individual and team performances.

“I’m a batsman, I don’t really bowl much, personally I made 87 earlier this year just before Xmas,” Darcy says.

“I’m more of a bowler, and sometimes bat, but not usually in the seniors – I don’t have too many standout games, I haven’t had the standout performances like Darce – I’ve probably had more success keeping teams playing the way we want them to play,” Brady says.

The journey the brothers have taken to becoming talented cricketers began with Jack, who as the eldest was able to influence his younger siblings.

“We both started playing at the same time because Jack forced us to go down to training – it was after Christmas a while back and we had just started playing backyard cricket — he told us to come down see what is like and we haven’t stopped since,” Darcy says.

“Before we started playing cricket we didn’t even think about it, we thought it was boring, Dad would be watching it and we thought “why would you watch tha”, but we started to get into it and now we can’t stop,” Brady says.

Warrandyte Cricket Club are certainly glad that the brothers made the decision to pick up the bat and ball, and with youngest brother Oscar — aged 11 — still waiting in the wings, the Pooles may soon have another superstar wearing the baggy whites at Warrandyte Reserve.