Monthly Archives: February 2017

Police appeal for witnesses to Yarra Street crash


On Monday February 20 at around 6:40am there was a collision on Yarra Street involving a truck and a parked car.

Sergeant Stewart Henderson of Warrandyte Police is appealing to the public for any witnesses to last Monday’s incident.

In a statement to the Diary, Sgt Henderson said: “We are interested in either the driver’s actions prior to the accident, at the time of the accident or any actions of the driver after the accident.”

If you witnessed the accident or have any information relating to it, please contact Warrandyte Police or email warrandyte.uni@police.vic.gov.au

Songlines in Warrandyte


When British settlement in Australia began in 1788 the colonists were essentially blind to Aboriginal technology. The manicured environment they saw had been carefully shaped by constant burning off and it looked for all the world like an English gentlman’s estate. However, it was nevertheless thought of as the “natural” state of affairs. These misapprehensions permeate our history books and continue to influence our thinking right up to the present day. So in this sense we have been brought up to be virtually blind to many aspects of our Aboriginal heritage.

It is exactly the same situation with Aboriginal trade and travel routes, which are known as Songlines. The reason they are called Songlines is because the landmarks, ecological features and creation stories along each route were coded into a song. Aboriginal people had to learn hundreds of these songs that had verses patching into each other, thus enabling them to diverge at any given point onto a different trail and a different song.

These Songlines criss-crossed the whole of Australia with the important travel routes covering many hundreds of kilometres. These major Songlines were even coded celestially, so that the various landmarks were represented in the constellations. For instance, one such celestially coded Songline goes from Alice Springs to Byron Bay.

Now just pause and think about this for a minute. Why would people from Alice Springs want to travel to Byron Bay and vice versa? The answer is both simple and stunning.

People from the central desert wanted to go to the far east coast to witness the local people working in co- operation with dolphins to catch fish. Every dolphin was known by name and responded to their name in working as a team to drive shoals of fish to the shore. Aboriginal people would net the fish and then share the fish evenly with the dolphins. On the other side of the ledger people from the far east coast of Australia wanted to travel to the central desert to see the majestic Uluru for themselves.

When settlers first arrived in Melbourne in 1835 they simply got on their horses and in their carts and started spreading out into the hinterland. They of course followed the ridge lines, valley lines and easy contours that seemed to be remarkably free of trees and offered convenient travel routes. These Songlines then became established cart tracks and were progressively gravelled then bitumenised.

So while Melbourne itself was established on a surveyed one mile square grid of north-south and east-west roads, all the meandering roads out of Melbourne were originally Aboriginal Songlines. If you take an aerial view in your mind’s eye, you can see all the main roads radiating out of Melbourne: Geelong Road, Ballarat Road, Calder Highway, Sydney Road, Plenty Road, Heidelberg Road, Maroondah Highway,

Dandenong Road and Nepean Highway. They were all originally Songlines, but are not recognised as such, and our kids at school are not taught this part of our heritage.

It is in fact quite easy to identify Songlines and being on the Yarra, Warrandyte has an abundance of them. You can for instance be certain that any shallow rapids area on the Yarra was the point at which a Songline crossed the river. The street where the Police Station is situated is one such place where the Songline taking you to Research crossed the river to follow the Research-Warrandyte Road. Barely a couple of hundred metres further up where the bridge stands, is where the Songline to Kangaroo Ground starts. Take a trip along the Kangaroo Ground Road and see how it follows the ridge line and gives you 360 degree views. It is of course also a Songline.

Another good example is Tindals Road. Take your kids along it and enjoy the panoramic vistas to the east and west. Tell them, “Hey kids, this is an Aboriginal Songline, You know this because you can see for miles.” Originally the Tindals Road Songline branched off from Doncaster Road to follow Old Warrandyte Road. It then went past the Donvale Christian College, followed the ridge line and dropped down into Pound Bend. However, it is now bisected by Warrandyte Road where a cutting has been put in.

Much of Warrandyte Road itself was also a Songline. The route followed the ridge line as it does today past Warrandyte High School, but the original Songline then followed Melbourne Hill Road. With a little bit of thought it is relatively easy to identify the original route of these Songlines by seeing where cuttings and diversions have been put in.

So if you have any information that could help to map these local Songlines and restore knowledge of this part of our heritage, please let me know.

Tennis hot shots at Rod Laver Arena

Four groups of young tennis players from the ANZ Tennis Hot Shots program took over both Rod Laver Arena and Margaret Court Arena last Thursday as Tennis Australia renamed Australia Day the “Tennis Guru Day”.

Forty players aged seven to nine from Warrandyte Tennis Club, Warrandyte Primary School and Milgate Primary School participated in the Tennis Guru Hot Shots program on centre court.

The demonstrations highlighted some of the activities the young tennis players learn in the Hot Shots coaching program.

For half an hour the kids, aged between seven and nine years, demonstrated their skills to the crowd.

They were then followed by the professionals in their Australian Open matches.

While the kids strutted their stuff, coach Craig Haslam was interviewed by Tennis Australia for big screen crosses at the change of ends.

“These kids ran onto a huge stadium and played the game of tennis completely independent of adult support for 30 minutes.

The demonstration was not rehearsed, it was just kids having the time of their life playing tennis. I was so proud of them,” said Mr Haslam.

He must have heard the words “they are so cute” at least a hundred times that morning.

The Hot Shots tennis program demonstrations are a regular feature of the Australian Open and other demonstrations took part on the other major courts throughout the Grand Slam.

On your marks Warrandyte

WITH only one month to go, volunteers were representing Run Warrandyte at the February Riverside Market last Saturday.

The annual event, which is now in its sixth year, grows in both event size and distances.

Now a regular event in Warrandyte on the March sporting calendar, this year’s Run Warrandyte has partnered with charity Stop, One Punch Can Kill (SOPCK) making this year’s event not only a celebration of fitness within the community but also a stand, or should I say sprint, against violence too.

“We are very excited to include SOPCK in our event this year,” said David Dyason of the Run Warrandyte Committee.

“We have introduced a team fundraising aspect to this year’s event with prizes being awarded to the team which raises the most money for the charity.”

The SOPCK charity was set up in the wake of the death of David Cassai, who was a killed on New Year’s Eve 2012.

Mr Cassai had ties to the local community as he attended Warrandyte High School and often watched the footy.

The Warrandyte footy club got behind the SOPCK campaign in the 2016 season.

As one-punch deaths become an increasing problem, sports clubs are often used as a conduit to engage young people in the Stop campaign, and with the sports club contributing to the management and facilities that Run Warrandyte uses, it seems fitting to have SOPCK as the event’s first official charity.

“People like the philosophy of running, but are often put off by the physical aspect.”

“I think having a fundraising part to the run will encourage people to sign up and get out on the course,” said John, a member of the Run Warrandyte team.

The course is similar to last year with one loop that brings runners back to the sports oval; run distances are determined by the number of laps they do.

The Run Warrandyte Committee will have the usual support of the local fireys, keeping everyone cool, as well as some on-course entertainment to keep everyone’s spirits up on that long climb up to The Pound.

The Grand Hotel Gift, a 100 metre, handicapped sprint is also back after last year’s successful integration into the running event.

While registration for the Gift alone is possible, participants in the 2.2K, 5K, 10K and 15K distances are encouraged to also enter the Gift as entry for these people is complimentary.

To help with training, Run Warrandyte local personal trainer Chris of RivvaPT has produced a training plan, which is available through the Run Warrandyte Facebook page, for the 5K and 10K distances.

“We have had a number of people ask us if we can walk any of the runs,” said Mr Dyason.

“Because we have to close public roads, if people want to only walk, we suggest they enter the 2.2 or 5K event.”

The Gift and the longer runs all start and finish on the oval, where a number of local clubs and businesses are expected to be on display, making it a great morning out for both runners and non-runners.

The run takes place on March 5.

Run Warrandyte registration can be found online and the Run Warrandyte team regularly posts updates and competitions on their Facebook page.

Further delays to NBN rollout

NBN’s three-year plan for deployment, which was announced in the December 2015 issue of the Diary, stated that residents in the east of Warrandyte would receive NBN by fixed wireless commencing first quarter 2017, and the majority of people in Warrandyte and North Warrandyte would receive NBN by fibre-to-the-node commencing in the second half of 2017.

As these dates are now upon us, we asked NBN Co how things were progressing.

Michael Moore, Manager of State Corporate Affairs at NBN Co, told the Diary due to network design changes, he was unable to provide an accurate update of the construction schedule for Warrandyte.

“The best I can suggest is that people use the new check your address function on the front page of NBN Co’s website to find out information relating to their premises. They can also register for updates. I expect greater clarity by March,” he said.

Checking a number of addresses in Warrandyte and North Warrandyte, which were originally to be covered by fixed wireless, shows, in all cases, an availability date of January to June 2018 – with an asterisk indicating “this is an estimate and could change”.

As no plans have yet been lodged for the proposed wireless tower to the east of Warrandyte and the promised community information sessions have not been scheduled, it would appear that fibre-to-the- curb (FTTC) technology could be under consideration for the east of

Warrandyte previously planned to be covered by fixed wireless.

FTTC is a new technology which sits halfway between fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP), a solution scrapped by the current government where fibre would have been taken to every home/office, and fibre-to-the-node (FTTN) where fibre would be installed to boxes in the street within 1km from each premises, the “last mile” being handled through existing telephone cabling.

With FTTC the fibre is taken to the pillar or pit, which would be much nearer the destination premises than with FTTN.

Also FTTC technology is reverse powered at the pit or pillar from the network termination device (NTD) in the home/office, obviating the need for a power supply that would have been necessary at the node for FTTN and thereby reducing costs.

The downside is a further delay in implementation; the upside is that since the FTTC point would be nearer each premises than with FTTN, faster speeds will be possible. Meanwhile, around 100 Warrandyte residents have given their support to a petition circulating on the change.org website calling on local state member Ryan Smith to urge Telstra to upgrade the Warrandyte exchange and speed up NBN implementation because it is needed for reliability of communications in a bush fire situation.

This petition is well-meaning but somewhat misdirected and is unlikely to achieve any speed-up of the process.

Firstly, the NBN is being implemented by NBN Co not by Telstra, secondly this is a federal matter not a state one, thirdly the Warrandyte telephone exchange is a state-of-the-art modern exchange and does not need upgrading, and finally, the NBN, although providing much faster internet connectivity, is unlikely to be any more resilient in a bush fire situation than current ADSL systems.

The message at the moment is not to expect anything in the short term. The Diary will keep you updated with further developments and hopefully we can reveal more in the April edition.

Potters wheel into Warrandyte again

Around 70 potters from across Victoria and New South Wales will be descending on Warrandyte for the 17th annual Pottery Expo.

With a variety of wares, from fine porcelain to garden sculpture, the potters will display their creations along the banks of the Yarra on February 25-26.

The Pottery Expo at Warrandyte was instigated by local studio potter, Jane Annois in February 2001, after she saw the French Marche de Potiers [Potters Markets] of France.

“The first time I went to France, to Lyon, I was blown away, there was 170 stands of potters, and you couldn’t move, there were so many people, it was so exciting, the French said, ‘you don’t have potters’ markets in Australia? and they said you ’must start one’. So I did,” said Ms Annois.

The exhibitors have been invited on a basis of excellence, with variety and innovation foremost in the selection panel’s criteria.

This year’s feature artist at the Warrandyte Expo is John Tuckwell from Bellingen in NSW, who works in porcelain coloured slips.

“He is also going to give us a work-shop on the Wednesday March 1 at the Mechanics Institute, for beginners and experienced potters,” Ms Annois said.

Click here to book John Tuckwell’s workshop.

Several local artists will also join the expo, including three members of the Pittard family from Eltham, who have been taking part since the very first expo, and works by members of the Warrandyte Stonehouse artists’ collective will be on display.

Another innovative local artist whose works will be on display is Jack Latti from Research, who creates ceramic pieces for use in the garden.

“He is a horticulturalist as well and he actually designs the pots to suit the plant,” said Ms Annois.

Aside from the works on sale at the expo, there will be activities for both kids and adults, with Manningham Craft Works providing clay work-shops for children to make their own creations and demonstrations of clay throwing.

Forums on the business of art will be on offer for adults, as well as wine tastings, musicians and a Saturday night dinner on the banks of the river.

The Pottery Expo runs from 10am until 5:30pm on both February 25 and 26. Entry is free.

Australia Day honours for Warrandyte’s finest

This year’s Australia Day saw a clutch of honours go to local Warrandyte residents.

We welcome Warrandyte’s newest member of the Order of Australia, Judy Lazarus (AM), Her citation commends her for significant service to the community through social welfare groups, notably through custodial rehabilitation and resettlement initiatives.

She has been involved in a variety of services, including Victorian Association for the Care and Resettlement of Offenders, Beechworth Correctional Centre, Association of Neighbourhood Houses and Learning Centres, Beechworth Health Service, Women’s Correctional Services Committee, and the Ministerial Community Advisory Committee – Prison Leaves and a Non-Government Sector Representative for the Corrections Victoria Stakeholder’s Forum. Judy has also been a recipient of a Churchill Fellowship, and has had the Judy Lazarus Transitional Centre named in her honour.

Also receiving a national honour for meritorious service was Warrandyte local Paul Wilkinson who received an Ambulance Service Medal (ASM).

Mr Wilkinson has been a paramedic with Ambulance Victoria for over 32 years and throughout his career has focused on developing paramedics and improving workplace health and safety.

His citation noted that “He has consistently demonstrated a selfless attitude and dedication to improving the lives and well-being of his colleagues. As a Clinical Instructor, he worked to mentor and instruct graduate paramedics to develop and build their clinical skills, and provide a strong ambulance service to the community”.

The Menzies community awards were handed out by local federal member Kevin Andrews, who saw the occasion as one to celebrate the grassroots achievements in our community.

“If only we knew what people in our community do, it is only on occasions like this that we find out,” said Mr Andrews.

The Menzies Community Awards saw two Warrandyte recipients.

Pam Booth received an award for her contribution as a volunteer at Information Warrandyte for a total of 13 years.

Ms Booth’s citation describes her as a “dedicated and reliable volunteer who capably assisted visitors and clients. She also contributed to Information Warrandyte’s Directory of Services and maintained the Community Centre Public noticeboard. Pam has been a long time Warrandyte resident, local kindergarten teacher and Warrandyte Tennis Club member”.

Denise Farran was recognised as a valued member of the Warrandyte community, working with the Neighbourhood House Committee of Management and as a Film Society member and volunteer. She was also recognised for her volunteer work at the Tarrawarra Gallery and for events at the Warrandyte Arts Association and Festival.

Denise Farran was very surprised to receive her award, especially after accidentally mistaking her letter as junk mail – but fortunately she managed to recover her invitation.

“The award was a surprise and a real treat,” she said.

Menzies Awards were also given to the parents of local identity Peter Fraser, whose father Malcolm Fraser and mother Beverley Fraser were both recognised for their work at St Mark’s Anglican Church in Templestowe.

Flash Fiction

In August, the Diary opened its inbox to the young storytellers of Warrandyte.

Thorough collaboration with local schools, the Diary invited these aspiring authors and poets to submit their best works. The Diary is happy to share this work on this webpage and in the Warrandyte Diary.

Rhyming poems

By ERIN 3/4R

My grandma sent me to the store
To buy a nice new dress
I came home with a boot and a giant obsess

My daddy sent me to the store
To buy a pair of shorts
I came home with a book and some courts

My sister sent me to the store
To buy a brand new cat
I came home with some jeans and a bright pink hat

My parents sent me to the store
To buy a kitchen sink
I came home with a dog and t-shirt that was pink

My cousin sent me to the store
To buy a second-hand computer
I came home with a tree-house and a producer

 

By PAIGE 3/4R

My aunty sent me to the store,
To buy a pretty dress.
I came home with a parachute,
And a giant mess.

My puppy sent me to the store,
To buy some yummy treats.
I came home with a drum kit,
And some really good beats.

My grandma sent me to the store,
To buy some brand new dentures.
I came home with a pack of screws,
And some rusty wrenches.

My sister sent me to the store,
To buy a bright pink skirt.
I came home with a cactus,
And a torn up shirt.

My grandpa sent me to the store,
To buy some new black braces.
I came home with a pair of socks,
And some purple laces.

The Meaning of Life

By MAYA

Hello, my name is Maya and I’m in year 5/6B at Anderson’s Creek Primary School.
I decided to write something that I believe in very much.
I want to share this topic with my community to show that you don’t need expensive things, or fame to live the best life you possibly can.

People imagine what a grand life would be like.
For many people, they close their eyes and picture gold coins and priceless jewels, they imagine big houses and endless riches.
When people think of a wonderful life, they think of only what they do not have.
They think they don’t have enough to be happy.
But is that the right way to live life?
For me, I believe that a grand life involves happiness and support all around you, to be loved and cherished for not what you have, but for who you are.
There are many people that think of a grand life as a world that would have no war or running water in their country, things we all take for granted in first world countries.
There are people that live in poverty and in sickness but they do not wish for any more than they have.
They feel that they have all they need to live a grand life, and the reason why is because they have gratitude, love and kindness around them.
Things you don’t need riches to have, things that are the most important feelings to keep you living a joyful, grand life.

Our true world

By RUBY – 5/6B

Here is a story that needs to be told,
It’s bitter and icy, like the Antarctic cold.
Our world is dying, slowly each day,
And there’s something I’d just like to say.
We think we know so much, in every inch, in every space.
But we don’t know much about this wondrous place.
Deep in the ocean our colourful coral,
Is dying away from spills of oil.
Inside the jungle there’s chatter and caper,
But it’s getting cut down for cardboard and paper.
The polluted air, in which we breathe,
Is chocking all our plants and trees.
By the beach on our golden sands,
Is a whole heap of rubbish, plastic and cans.
So us as humans, we need to act fast,
If we want our world to last.
To save our world we need many hands,
You don’t need to be our biggest fans.
I think this statement is more than true,
The little changes start with you.

 

My brother’s room

By CAMERON

My brother’s room, what a nightmare!
It’s so messy it’s like a tsunami of clothes, toys, rubbish and painful Lego.
My brother’s room, what a nightmare!
My Mum shouts “clean it up!”
My Dad bellows “clean it up, it is like a dump!”
What does my brother do?
NOTHING!!!!!!!
It’s like he controls the Lego, it finds its way tooth softest part of my foot.
And sinks its Lego teeth into my flesh.
I scream and kick.
My brother’s room, what a nightmare!
I don’t know how he gets around it.
His bed has not been washed like in a millennia.
It’s so dirty you might catch malaria!
The walls haven’t been washed or the celling or the smelly carpet.
One day I called the pest control to the room.
They couldn’t clean it because it smells like toxic.
The room is finally clean.
One day later the room is messy AGAIN!

 

Gorgons

By LAURA and TAHLIA

Once in Greek Myths, there were three hideous, mischief making monsters. They were called…
The Gorgons!
Stheno, Euryale and Medusa! Now, these three monsters were, almost unstoppable, flesh-eating horrendous creatures.
With a glance of the eye, you would be turned to stone.
Their snake-like hair could kill you in one bite.
Their long claws could rip you to pieces.
Stheno and Euryale, are the daughters of the evil Echidna and Typhon.
That means they are both immortal.
But, Medusa was considered mortal because people believed that her parents were, Phorkys and Keto.
That was why in the Greek Myths, Perseus was able to kill Medusa by slicing off her head with a long sharp sword or scythe.
But once, when Medusa was like every other Olympian, her beauty attracted Poseidon, the god of the sea and had an affair with him.
Then, Athena found out and turned Medusa into that monstrous creature, but as you may know, the three creatures always stood by each other’s side and Stheno and Euryale got turned into the hideous monsters!