Monthly Archives: November 2016

Wine and dine at Dolans

Say hello to our epicurean super hub

Two years after being awarded Best New Winery in Australia by James Halliday, Rob Dolan has opened his schmick new cellar door in Warrandyte South. Set on 100 acres of rolling farm- land and vineyard, and just 30 minutes from Melbourne CBD, Rob has “location, location” sorted.

The space is open seven days per week (10am-5pm) offering complementary wine tastings of 15 wines (we recommend the Black Label Four + One – a Mediterranean style blend of Grenache, Sangiovese, Barbera, Tempranillo and Shiraz sold exclusively at the cellar door).

The stunning tout was designed by Dale White and Bek Gallagher (The Public Brewery, The Cellar Door by The Public Brewery, Bekendales and The Farm Yarra Valley) and makes a statement with restored original features, reclaimed timbers and a huge wrap around recycled timber deck. Wine is available to purchase and take home or enjoy on site with picnic blankets and games such as Finska or Bocce provided free for guests.

The winery is also home to the Stone and Crow Cheese Company’s “Crow’s Nest”. Founder and cheesemaker Jack Holman may be better known for his role as head cheesemaker at Yarra Valley Dairy for the past 12 years, making him an integral part of our region’s food and wine heritage (some like to refer to him as “Cheesus”).

Ever the innovator, Jack sees Stone and Crow as a vehicle to move the Australian cheese scene forward by creating his own styles without boundaries, and this is his opportunity to be truly experimen- tal. The core range of cheeses are readily available in the cellar door to take home or enjoy as part of a platter on site. Our personal favourite would have to be the Galactic – a 1-2 week old cow’s milk cheese – think soft and delicate with bread flavours and some acidity – perfect with the True Colours Field Blend.

To complete the offering Rob has commissioned the chefs at neighbouring dining and events venue The Farm Yarra Valley to source and make in-house a selection of crackers specifically to suit Jack’s cheeses. Chef Ben Van Tiggelen has worked for the likes of Jacques Reymond, Dan Wilson and Neil Perry so knows a thing or two about sourcing the best produce.

It also doesn’t hurt to have kitchen gardens on-site that are lovingly tended to by Fabian Capomolla (aka the Hungry Gardener). Fabian also co-founded The Little Veggie Patch, the company behind the famous Pop up Patch at Melbourne’s Federation Square.

And if for some reason you still find yourself wanting more why not try something from Rob’s accompaniments range – perhaps the Cucumber Pickle or the Pinot Noir Jelly? All of his accompaniments are made exclusively for the cellar door by Caroline Grey from A Bit of Jam and Pickle.

Rob Dolan Wines Cellar Door, 21-23 Delaneys Rd, Warrandyte South. Open 7 days 10am-5pm.

Cricket resumes: hat-trick hero Steve

CRICKET has returned to Warrandyte for the 2016/17 season, but due to some bemusing league decisions and wet pitches, there have only been six results from a possible 20 games.

Despite a few sunny forecasts on Saturdays, the RDCA has elected to call two different rounds off across the league to ensure fair competition, with varying quality in grounds. On the positive side, Warrandyte’s seniors had only lost one game by October’s end.

In the available games, Warrandyte showed extremely promising signs. The First XI and Second XI both took victories in Round 1. For the First XI, Dave Mooney started off yet another season in fine nick, posting 47 not out to guide Warrandyte to a very defendable 170 at a slow Dorset Oval.

In doing so, Mooney became the highest all time First XI run scorer, setting another record in his golden career with the club.

South Croydon was under pressure from the start, with Daniel Barry and Alex McIntosh taking apart the batting lineup with three and two wickets respectively.

Warrandyte went on to win by 45 runs.

In Round 2, Warrandyte faced a tough task at home, chasing 351 after Templeton thrashed the bowling attack around the Warrandyte Cricket Ground. Warrandyte’s coach Jake Sherriff (6/76) was reliable with the ball on a tough day, taking late scalps to peg back the wickets before Warrandyte was saved by the rain.

The Second XI was also victorious in Round 1, recording a strong home victory against Warranwood. Dale Lander led from the top of the order with 62, while new skipper Campbell Holland slashed 47 to give his side an excellent start. Lander would be promoted to the First XI the following round and Warrandyte knocked out 207 before sending in the bowling attack.

The home side was able to dismiss the Warrandwood batsmen in quick order on a fast wicket, taking a 50- run victory thanks to tight bowling from Tom Ellis (3/10) and Campbell Holland (3/13).

In other results, Warrandyte’s Third XI thanked Tyson Brent and Josh Aitken for providing 264 in their first game of the year.

On a postal stamp ground against Montrose, Brent’s batting was exceptional considering it was his first knock of the season, giving the team good faith in their batting lineup.

The Fourth XI cruised to victory in its run chase against Heathmont Baptists, returning to the holy grail ground at Stintons Reserve.

Patient batting from Dave Molyneux and direct bowling from John Prangley and Daniel Woodhead made the difference.

The Fifth XI was unable to chase down Ainslie Park, despite some strong individual performances. Ben Sprout pegged back the Ainslie Park batsmen with a ve-wicket haul, effectively closing out the innings with late strikes to hold the batters to 207.

Stephen Grocott provided hope for Warrandyte with 41no, but they eventually fell 42 runs short.

Results:
First XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte 6/170 (Mooney 47 not out) d South Croydon 8/135 (D Barry 3/20, McIn- tosh 2/16). Round 2 – Warrandyte drew Templeton 8/351 (Sherriff 6/76)

Second XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte 6/207 (Lander 62, Holland 47) def. Warranwood 157 (T Ellis 3/10, Holland 3/13). Round Two – Warrandyte drew with North Ringwood.

Third XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with East Ringwood. Round 2 – Warrandyte 3/264 (Brent 106, Aitken 59 not out) d Montrose 135 (Smead 3/16, Ison 2/16). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with Norwood.

Fourth XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with Warranwood. Round 2 – Warrandyte 3/135 (Molyneux 60) d Heathmont Baptist 7/130 (Prang- ley 3/17, Woodhead 2/19). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with South Warrandyte.

Fifth XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with Croydon North. Round 2 – Warrandyte 165 (Grocott 41 not out, Jackson 32) d by Ainslie Park 7/207 (Sproat 5/34). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with Heathmont Baptist.

Sixth XI: Round 1 – Warrandyte drew with North Ringwood. Round 2 – Warrandyte d by Heathmont Baptist (forfeit). Round 3 – Warrandyte drew with North Ringwood.

Quinton’s IGA in the movies

WARRANDYTE’S Quinton’s SUPA IGA are the stars of a new short film which aims to inspire healthy, creative and affordable ways to feed the whole family.

Last month, Independent Grocer of Australia (IGA) chose Quinton’s to help launch the IGA Family Program and the new initiative is the subject of the IGA movie. Owner Julie Quinton — pictured with her children Hayley (left), Dale (right) and granddaughter Ocea, — says she is proud to be a part of such an exciting program.

“We want to create an even stronger community for all our customers and the IGA Family Program is a great way to help families with healthy recipes, creative activities and fun facts,” says Julie.

The film will become available towards the end of this month and the team at Quinton’s SUPA IGA can’t wait to show the community their on-screen talent.

Quinton’s SUPA IGA invite local families to sign up via family.iga.com.au and check out the new site which provides information on how to live in a happier and healthier Australia.

The Family Program offers a range of activities designed to encourage kids to be creative and imaginative as well as develop cooking skills.

The program also promotes educating children on where their food comes from to help foster a greater and healthier relationship with food. This category, known as the “Paddock to Plate”, will have regularly updated information and a newsletter to members who sign up.

Members will have the chance to win regular prizes and children up to the age of 13 will receive an exciting birthday gift from Quinton’s each year.

Julie says the store is proud to support a variety of local charities every day through the IGA Community Chest initiative which also funds local sporting teams and organisations through in-store purchases.

Quinton’s also supports the community through the Quinton’s Rewards Points program that donates a percentage of the money spent.

“We have a thriving local community with many families shopping each week at their local Quinton’s IGA,” Julie says.

Bushfire scenario event is a great success

What is it like to survive a bush fire? About 100 people learnt (the easy way) from those who found out the hard way as part of the Be Ready Warrandyte initiative.

The audience heard from bush fire survivors, Joff Manders, who lived through bush fires in Warrandyte in the 1960s, Steve Pascoe, a resident of Strathewen who lost his whole community on Black Saturday, and Julia Robertson, who lost her home in Flannery Court two years ago.

A realistic scenario was played out across the evening, using a timeline of events, from ignition to recovery, of a fire sweeping through Warrandyte.

The audience heard a frank description of what living through such an event was like, overlayed with ideas and advice on how to make effective choices at every turn.

School principals, the police and fire brigade and other community leaders offered insight into the policy and procedures local institutions follow to keep the community safe.

Quinton’s IGA’s Julie Quintin reminded residents the supermarket would not necessarily be available as a place of refuge as her policy is to evacuate the store to keep her staff safe in the event of a major incident.

“You may turn up to see the lights on and the generator running, but it will be locked up and you won’t have access,” she said.

Warrandyte High School principal Dr Steven Parkin said local schools have been given funding to bolster the school’s fire refuges against bush fire impact.

Sue Dyos, acting principal of Anderson’s Creek Primary School, told parents the school had procedures to deal with such a scenario an it is safer to leave children at school.

“Don’t put yourself in danger to come and collect your kids, they will be in a safe place,” she said.

Local police sergeant Stewart Henderson discussed the likely conditions on the road in a fire and pointed out roads would be thick with smoke and clogged with traffic, making travel perilous.

Sgt Henderson also reminded the audience that once the fire had been through, if an area is deemed unsafe by the fire brigade you would not be allowed past roadblocks.

“So you may be gone for days,” he said.

Julia Robertson gave a gripping recount of her family’s experience during the Flannery Court fire, outlining all of the things she had wished she had done to be better prepared and how the loss of her home had impacted her.

“No one thinks it will happen to them, but it does,” she said.

She told how not knowing whether or not her family was alive were the worst hours of her life.

“I discovered a home is built from memories and relationships not from possessions,” she said.

CFA chief officer Craig Lapsley rounded out the evening with his insights into bush fire survival.

“Find two ways to find information… being informed gives you choices and helps you make better decisions,” he said.

Mr Lapsley praised Warrandyte for being a smart, connected and well resourced community and said Warrandyte as a community had the resilience to survive a major bush fire.

“Don’t be scared, but take it seriously, work out where the stresses are and stick together,” he said. Warrandyte Community Association president Dick Davies said the focus of the night was to examine how the community was going to be able to pick up the pieces if a bush fire comes through Warrandyte.

“If things do go wrong, if we do lose lots of houses, or even lives, you need to know what to expect. There will be social dislocation and social dysfunction and it’ll be up to the community to put that stuff right,” Mr Davies said.

Facilitator Steve Pascoe told the Diary since he spoke to the Warrandyte community two years ago there had been a major shift into leaving early and this event has been able to highlight what that means; that is having a plan of exactly where to go, what you need to take and how to cope with the aftermath.

“The strange mix of elation and guilt that you have survived where others have not – it is a tough thing to deal with,” he said.

A major theme of the night was that things don’t always go to plan and despite planning to leave, people may still get caught at home, so residents need to prepare for that eventuality.

Mr Lapsley told the Diary he believed the event was timely because November is the time to begin preparing for the bush fire season.

“Whatever you have to do on your property, if you don’t start in November, it’ll beat you,” he said.

Warrandyte Neighbourhood House is running a Fire Plan Workshop on November 26.

Council election shake-up

Nillumbik shake-up: new faces for Sugarloaf and Mullum Mullum

THE people have voted and Nillumbik’s Sugarloaf Ward and Manningham’s Mullum Mullum Ward have elected new councillors in this year’s council elections.

Only one incumbent will return to Nillumbik council in a boilover election, which was expected given the controversial lead-up surrounding landscape and environmental overlay amendments.

Peter Perkins was the only candidate to land more than 50 per cent of first preference votes but will be seated alongside a near clean sweep of new faces in the Nillumbik chamber.

Jane Ashton emerged victorious from a field of 14 candidates in Sugarloaf while Andrew Conlon was one of three councillors elected in Mullum Mullum, joining re-elected councillors Paul McLeish and Sophy Galbally.

Ashton registered 54 per cent of Sugarloaf’s 5800 voters as the ward witnessed its largest ever number of candidates running for election since it was restructured by the Victorian Electoral Commission in 2008.

Sugarloaf’s new councillor said she was looking forward to the role ahead and working in such a picturesque environment.

“I’m humbled by the support I received and it’s important to thank Ken King for his eight years of service as the previous Sugarloaf councillor,” Ashton said. “This must be one of the most beautiful wards in Victoria and I just love the diversity of the landscape and the wonderful people who live here. I am so excited,” she added.

Ashton also emphasized her commitment to reviewing the C81 and C101 amendments and stressed the importance of working together as a community on issues such as the Warrandyte Bridge.

“The election result was a clear mandate for change, with an overwhelming majority of rural residents voting to reject the controversial C81 and C101. So, obviously the first thing I want to see is these amendments reviewed,” she said.

“I want to reassure people that I do not want to dismantle the Green Wedge, but there was definitely a level of anger and frustration in the community about the ever increasing divide between the reality of living in Nillumbik, particularly around fire mitigation, property management and the micro management and prescriptive attitude of the previous council.

“Good sustainable land management is essential, but you achieve this by working with the community, not by alienating them,” Ashton explained.

“I am looking forward to the bridge widening in Warrandyte being completed as quickly as possible and will in the longer term lobby for a North East Ring road, which would not only reduce traffic congestion in Warrandyte, but also in other areas of Nillumbik.”

Over 23,000 voters took part in Mullum Mullum’s election and with a voter turnout of just under 80 per cent, the contest was considerably close.

Conlon was not only the new face on the Manningham Council block but he also received the most votes in the ward, claiming the highest percentage of votes at 16 per cent.

McLeish and Galbally received 12.95 per cent and 10.34 per cent respectively to remain as councillors. Outgoing councillor, Meg Downie, narrowly missed out with 9.30 per cent.

Conlon said the opportunity to represent Mullum Mullum was exciting and he is eager to start as a councillor.

“It’s a great honour. I hope to serve the people of Mullum Mullum and Manningham as well as I can for the next four years and I’m thoroughly looking forward to it,” he said.

“I’m hoping to ensure Manningham can reduce the risk of bush fire and it will be great working on behalf of the rate payers and residents of Manningham.

Who’s in for Manningham:

Heide Ward: Geoff Gough (returning), Paula Piccinini, Michelle Kleinert (returning). Koonung: Dot Haynes (re- turning), Anna Chen, Mike Za ropoulos. Mullum Mullum: Andrew Conlon, Paul Mc- Leish (returning), Sophy Gal- bally (returning).

Sugarloaf: Jane Ashton. Blue Lake: Grant Brooker. Bunjil: Karen Egan. Edendale: John Dumaresq. Ellis: Peter Per- kins. Swipers Gully: Bruce Ranken. Wingrove: Peter Clark.

Re-elected Cr McLeish said he was delighted to continue working with people in the Mullum Mullum Ward and paid tribute to departing councillor Meg Downie.

“I’m honoured and humbled by the opportunity. Our community has been very generous to re-elect me and consider me a worthy representative on their behalf, I’m looking forward to delivering for them,” he said.

“I’d like to thank Meg Downie for her dedication as a councillor who served her community very well.”

McLeish also singled out Warrandyte’s traffic dilemmas as a key issue that needs addressing.

“I will continue to press the case with the State Government to do the research and understand the nature of the traffic situation in Warrandyte. I’m very keen to see the right planning schemes in place and make sure any development doesn’t overwhelm the character of the area,” he said.

McLeish said the close election in the ward was representative of the many hard working candidates who ran in the election.

“Every organisation needs renewal,” said McLeish. “There’s four new councillors for Manningham and it’s great to see all the candidates who ran are community-minded people who would’ve made a positive impact to Manningham.”

Galbally echoed the sentiments of her Mullum Mullum colleague, pointing out that many of the ward’s candidates are already great contributors to the community.

“People who are willing to give up their time for committees and organisations that benefit the community is a great indication of the standard of candidates that took part in the election,” she said.

The re-elected councillor said she was thrilled to work with an updated council and also highlighted the importance of communication between councillors and residents in Mullum Mullum.

“I’m really grateful to the community and everyone who voted for me. It’s wonderful to have the encouragement to keep going and continuing to represent the community,” Galbally said.

“I expect it to be an even better council now that there’s a few fresh faces. I look forward to working with them all. People need to know that councillors are there for them on the big issues as well as smaller things. It’s important for us to listen to the community to help solve issues both big and small.”