Monthly Archives: September 2015

ATO scam rattles residents – just hang up!

THE latest money-grabbing scam has hit residents in Warrandyte in the form of a hoax phone call to landlines or mobile phones.

On answering the phone, the listener receives a recording in a female voice with an American accent advising it is a call from The Australian Taxation Office suggesting you have failed to pay an outstanding debt. You are warned unless contact is made immediately, arrest warrants will be issued.

To prevent that from happening the caller is told to phone a Melbourne or Sydney number to arrange immediate payment.

Needless to say, it’s a hoax message.  The Diary contacted the ATO who advise it has been flooded with calls and has nothing to do with the message. It has been reported to the Australian Federal Police, but the AFP are powerless to stop the calls as they originate from overseas and the phone numbers given (Voice-over-IP lines) are changed frequently.

If you receive such a call, the best advice is to simply hang up.

Bloods bag three flags

WARRANDYTE Football Club made history in a momentous day for the community winning three out of three grand finals in front of a jubilant crowd at Walker Park on Saturday.
the U19s, Reserves and Seniors outfits all displayed the necessary grit and desire to record hard-fought wins over Ferntree Gully, Forest Hill and Kilsyth respectively.
For Warrandyte, the Grand Final victories mean a promotion back into division three of the EFL, as well as a place in the history books, becoming the first team of the decade to have all three sides win their grand finals in one year.

2015 triple flag souvenir liftout Pages 17-20

Icing on the cake

Bloods seniors seal the deal for triple treat

By MIKEY DI PETTA and SCOTT PODMORE

AS if the pressure wasn’t on.

Two sensational performances by the Warrandyte Football Club Under 19s and Reserves to claim flag glory, and the Bloods seniors were suddenly faced with ticking off a perfect day – a triple premiership bonanza that was as rare as hen’s teeth.

Pressure, indeed, because our seniors were the ones every fan was most confident about and also because their victory would be the deciding factor for moving back into Division 3 where the competition is better and healthier.
Playing a Kilsyth team that had pipped the Bloods by a point during the season, Warrandyte was well and truly primed with a week off after a convincing second semi final win over Forest Hill and also welcomed back James Appleby and Troy Ratcliffe to field an imposing line-up full of strong run and carry.
The Bloods line-up couldn’t look any more menacing.

With the crowd also primed after two big wins in the earlier games, the roar for the Bloods was immense.
Warrandyte couldn’t have asked for a better start, winning the ball early out of the middle and generating penetrating inside 50 entries. The Bloods forwards were licking their lips and it didn’t take long for Froud to claim his first and Appleby to slot one shortly after. The Bloods stormed to a 13-point lead within minutes.
However, Kilsyth proved it was up for the fight and star full forward Jay Sherlock answered Froud with a major of his own, starting a run of three straight Kilsyth goals. The momentum of the game was turned on its head and only desperate defending by skipper Tom Naughtin kept the margin under single digits at the first change.

Sherlock began to stamp his authority on proceedings and booted a controversial second major that seemed to graze the post to hand Kilsyth a two-point lead at quarter time.

Coach Tout calmed his troops in the quarter time huddle and pointed out “we knew they would challenge like this, it’s no surprise”, urging his troops to settle, focus on their roles and get stuck into the style of game that had worked for them all year. That including demanding more from playmakers to rise to the challenge, and even squared up in and under veteran Tom Appleby with a poke to the chest making it clear he was one he wanted a big lift from – and deliver he did, as the Bloods came out in the second with a dominant display throughout the second term kicking six goals to two.

Dunn and Froud began to link up in brilliant fashion, assisting goals for each other to help build a strong Warrandyte lead. They would continue to dominate and bag 11 majors between them in a powerful display of two gun forwards seamlessly linking up as the competition’s most dangerous forward set-up.

Froud ran amok and quickly had the crowd in a state of delirium with three majors in 10 minutes and that excitement reached fever pitch when skipper Tom Naughtin bombed one in from outside 50.
As the half-time siren sounded, the Bloods left the field to raucous applause, having taken a commanding 25-point lead, 9.7.61 to 6.6.36.

The onslaught continued in the third term and Warrandyte seemed to have one hand on the cup with Froud benefiting from quick inside 50s that were clearly unsettling the Kilsyth defence. The Warrandyte run and carry was on show and was complemented by plenty of physical pressure from Jacob Daley, who threw his body into every contest as he had done all year. Daley was tremendous, an inspiration all day and eventually was rewarded with best afield honours.

Fans young and old began to accept that the trio of wins was now not just a possibility, but was looking extremely likely with Warrandyte leading by 44 points with a quarter to play.

It seemed impossible, but Kilsyth capitalised on Warrandyte’s drop off in intensity at the beginning of the fourth to squeeze their way back into the game. The underdogs chipped away at the deficit and suddenly found themselves within four goals off the lead with about ten minutes to play, but Warrandyte did enough to hold that lead and emerge as 23-point victors claiming the third premiership of the day.
Warrandyte fans piled onto the ground to celebrate with the three sides who had provided the first taste of grand final success since 2006. In a spirited community gesture, the senior team invited one and all in for the theme song which was delivered loud and proud.

Bring on season 2016 when the Bloods step up to Division 3.

FINAL SCORES

Warrandyte 3.5.23   9.7.41   15.10.100   16.11.107

Kilsyth           4.1.25   6.6.42   8.8.46       12.12.84

Warrandyte goals: Froud 6, Dunn 5, Naughtin, Lamaris, Ansaldi, Skorsis, T Appleby.

Warrandyte best: Daley, Gauci, Froud, T Appleby, Tout, Naughtin.
FLAG NO.2 Reserves dig deep and deliver

FRESH off the back of the inspirational U19s victory, the Reserves came out pumped up and ready to add to the Warrandyte tally.

The misty morning had cleared and the sun began to beam down over Walker Park and the crowd swelled to new levels in expectation for another terrific contest.

However, the game was a scrappy affair for the first 15 minutes of the match when both teams locked down each other’s forward line and the scoreboard was showing donuts. Not even a point had been scored as both teams went at it with relentless intensity.
But the Bloods finally broke the deadlock, finally managing to prize the ball free out of the endless stoppages and peg the first on the board before 100-goal star Gareth Hitchman also found a way through the big sticks to give the Bloods a two goal cushion going into the quarter time huddle.

Being scoreless in the opening stanza didn’t deter Forest Hill, who came out with the same level of attack on the ball and it started paying dividends.

Stoppages were certainly clogging the flow of the game and neither side was able to crack the game open. Jake Bentley showed admirable determination around the packs to help Warrandyte restrict opposition movement, but it was clear the Bloods had to get their season-defining “run and gun game going” to have a real chance, as one supporter aptly pointed out behind the fence.
A quiet quarter on the scoreboard for Warrandyte allowed Forest Hill to creep closer as the halftime siren blew, and managed to get within seven points of the Bloods, trailing Warrandyte 2.0 12 to 3.1 19.
An expectant and slightly restless Warrandyte crowd primed themselves to get behind the Reserves as they came out for the second half and do their part to help the side secure a second Bloods premiership.
However, it was Forest Hill doing all the singing in the stands after a magnificent three-goal burst stunned Warrandyte midway through the third term. The Bloods midfielders struggled to provide any serviceable entry for star forward Hitchman and co, as the fiercely congested nature of the game seemed to suit Forest Hill.

Strong defending by the Forest Hill back six restricted the Bloods to just two behinds for the term and Warrandyte trailed by nine heading into the last change, leaving the game on a knife balance. It was looking terribly like a repeat of last year’s Grand Final match in which the Bloods succumbed when it counted.

But not this time.
After a three quarter time spray by coach Wally Cashion, the Bloods came out showing they wanted it more. The game continued to sit in the balance throughout the early stages of the quarter, but it was Warrandyte holding field position due to terrific forward and midfield pressure, in particular by Toby Versteegen. The Bloods reduced the deficit to just two points by the 10 minute mark of the term and what followed in the final 20 minutes gave every supporter at the ground goosebumps. The Warrandyte boys well and truly switched on in the game’s most defining moments.
The Bloods found another gear and their forward line burst into life, seemingly feeding off the crowd. Hitchman bagged his third, which was quickly followed by a brilliant running goal by Kyle Sultana to put Warrandyte eight points up with just 10 minutes to play.
Dangerous small forward Matt Colborne-Veel finally got his moment late in the term kicking a clutch goal to give Warrandyte a double digit lead and send the pro-Warrandyte crowd into raptures.
With time winding down, Mitchell Gaffney iced the cake, kicing one of the goals of the season tucked on the boundary line to seal a classic 19-point win, Warrandyte taking the premiership by 18 points.

 

FINAL SCORE

Warrandyte 2.0.12   3.1.19    3.3.21   8.9.57

Forest Hill   0.0.0     2.0.12   5.0.30  6.3.39

Goals: Warrandyte: Hitchman 3, Sultana, Gaffney, Jurey, Colborne-Veel, Parker.

Best: Bentley, McWhirter, Munro, Johnstone, Versteegen, Gaffney.

 

Flag No.1 One giant leap for Warrandyte

By MICHAEL DI PETTA

UNDER 19s captain Sid Phillip-Owen said it best on Saturday in the post-match pandemonium as our Thirds rose from being underdogs to premiership heroes – “it’s one giant leap for Warrandyte”.

The Bloods’ Under 19s were first up on the big day and set the tone in sensational fashion claiming the flag with an inspiring 22-point win over Ferntree Gully.
Phillip-Owen played a terrific captain’s game to take home best afield honours and young star Benny Richardson kicked three to lead the Bloods to victory.

The game began in in typical finals fashion; tough and uncompromising, with consistent drizzle also affecting play. Warrandyte was relentless in its attack on the football in the middle of the ground and staunch down back, limiting inside fifties.
Young star Ben Richardson got Warrandyte off to the start they needed, finding space in the forward 50 to mark and convert.
The game remained stoppage heavy, with snap shots at goal serving as Warrandyte’s only way of troubling the scorers until Daniel Mifsud booted a beauty through the Bloods second.
Richardson added another late in the quarter to cap off a terrific first term, allowing Warrandyte to stun the more fancied rival in Ferntree Gully and take a 22-point lead into the quarter time break.
The second term was a very different affair, as Forest Hill emerged a much more effective team attacking the football with more vigor then the Bloods.

Getting numbers around the stoppages, the Forest Hill midfielders and forwards worked to lock the ball in their half and struck back with two quick snapped goals.
A couple of dropped marks and strong forays forward allowed Forest Hill to draw level, before a timely after-the-siren goal by Josh Beasley relieved the pressure for Warrandyte and allowed the Bloods to five-point lead into half-time.

The second half saw the Warrandyte leaders come to fore, especially captain skipper Sid who led by example, going back with the flight and putting his body on the line over and over again to rescue his side from opposition attacks. Defender Astan Ure stuck to his task in a lockdown role in the backline, but Ferntree Gully were still able to wrestle control of the game and took a five-point lead into the final change.

With the game and season on the line, Warrandyte lifted brilliantly in the final term, with Sean Bowers slotting one to put the Bloods 10 points clear with just 15 minutes to play. Ferntree Gully attempted to respond, but Captain Sid continued to play a blinder, especially when it counted, and refused to let his team surrender the lead.
A quick-fire pair of goals by big man Josh Beasley put the game beyond doubt with just a few minutes to spare and Warrandyte and supporters celebrated the first flag of the day.

FINAL SCORE

Warrandyte   3.4       4.5       5.8       9.13.67

Ferntree Gully 0.0     3.6       6.7       6.9.45

Warrandyte goals: Richardson 3, Beasley 3, Bowers, Mifsud, Bektash.

 

 

Steeped in history

STRAWBERRIES, cherries and an angel’s kiss in Spring. Aumann’s Family Orchard Shop is really made from all these things. The iconic shop at the old packing shed on the top of the hill in Harris Gully Road sells plenty of other yummy, fresh and delicious fruits too, including apples, pears, peaches, nectarines, apricots, plums, oranges and lemons.

Barry Aumann, 69, is part of a family that has been growing fruit here since the 19th century. Four generations of Aumanns have lived and worked on this land since the 1890s when Barry’s grandfather Wilhelm “Bill” and his brother Harry bought 60 acres on the beautiful hilly slopes.

“Some would say too bloody steep and not an ideal place for an or- chard,” quips Barry as he shares his family’s story with the Diary.

“My grandfather and his brother cleared the land and tried growing potatoes while they waited for the fruit trees to come into production. But the potatoes must have been hit- ting the rocks underground because they weren’t very evenly rounded,” he adds with a cheeky grin.

Wilhelm Aumann married Maria and they had four children, one of them being Herbert who was Barry’s father. Herbert married Marjorie and they had four kids too: Gwen, Bill, Richard and Barry. Herbert took over Harry’s share of the orchard and worked it with his sons until his death in 1986.

Barry’s mother Majorie died when Barry was only five and his two aunts Ada and Mary bought him up on the amily property. Barry’s robust and direct energy softens for a moment as he reflects on the loss of his mother at such a young age. “The older I got, the more I realized how much I missed her,” he says.

The three brothers, Bill, Richard and Barry, started working in the orchard when they were only five or six years of age.

“We had watering duties during the summer holidays,” remembers Barry. “There was a real art in that, making sure all the trees got a good drink.”

The boys all went to Box Hill Tech for three years then started working in the orchard full time when they were 14.

“Back then there was still no electricity along Tindals Road. It didn’t come until 1960,” says Barry. “So we grew up with Tilley lamps to light up our homes.”

In Barry’s grandfather’s day, taking the fruit to market was a much more leisurely affair than it is now.

His horse drawn cart loaded with cases of fruit would head off towards the Queen Victoria Market about midnight. The patient horses knew their route well and the orchardist could afford to nod off and have a snooze as the horses plodded stoically along throughout the dark night. They travelled through Kew and Richmond and arrived at the market as the first blush of dawn crept over the horizon. Cruise control 1910 style and the first driverless vehicles!

Now, over 100 years later, driverless cars are finally coming into pro- duction. Going to market became a lot quicker in 1926 when Bill Aumann purchased a Chev 4 cab chassis for 269 pounds and started trucking his fruit to town.

The Aumanns worked hard in the old days. When they picked fruit there was so much double, triple and quadruple handling. The apples and pears had to be picked from the tree, packed in a box, loaded onto a trailer, then loaded onto a truck and taken to the cool store in Fitzsimmons Lane.

When they were ready to sell, the process had to be repeated in reverse. The fruit was taken back to the orchard and stacked in the shed, then repacked for market and loaded onto the truck. That was all done by hand, but the Aumanns were used to the strenuous work and just got the job done. That changed during the 1960s when forklift trucks and bulk bins were introduced.

Barry has spent all his life on the orchard except for two years during the 1960s when he was called up for National Service. Barry served in Vietnam with The Royal Australian Engineers. After the war and back on the land, Barry met Michelle at a dance in Hawthorn.

“I took one look at her and thought she looks all right,” says Barry. “ We were married two years later in 1975.”

Barry and Michelle built a house on the orchard and have been there ever since, raising their three kids, Susannah, now 38, Michael 36 and Caroline 32.

After four generations of hard work running their business, the Aumanns are looking to sell the freehold and business, which include five acres of land.

“We have already sold some of the land,” says Barry. “But I would love to see the business continue and see the land being utilised. Michelle and I intend to stay on in the house we love, but I won’t be growing fruit. As far as The Aumanns are concerned, that has come to an end.

“We could have relocated the orchard but because of the Green Wedge restrictions we’ve been denied the opportunity to realise the full potential of the land value. I’m disappointed that we haven’t had the capital to relocate like many of our counterparts who have been able to get a fair price for their land.

“Life on the orchard has been great though,” Barry says with a grin. “It’s been bloody hard work. What we do revolves around the seasons and it’s a seven-day-a-week job. When you consider getting ready to leave for market at midnight the hours worked add up. Mostly I’ve been working 80 hours a week for over 50 years. The women in the family have been working just as hard as the men too.”

What has been good about a lifetime of work on the steep slopes of the family orchard?

“We’ve always had good rapport with the other orchardists,” says Barry. “It’s a great place to live and the view is fantastic from our place. We enjoy the best of both worlds. Living in this beautiful spot but only 30 minutes from town.

“One thing I will miss after we sell the business is interacting with all the different people who come in the shop. I will miss that.”

Netball seven heaven

THE end of the 2015 winter season capped off one of the strongest finishes in memory for the Warrandyte Netball Club as nine teams reached the grand final: three open age teams and six under age teams.

Playing at the Lower Templestowe courts against strong op- position including Donvale, East Doncaster and Eltham, seven teams managed to take home premiership glory, crowning Warrandyte as the winners on the day in the Doncaster and District Netball Competition.

A terrific day of finals competition kicked off early morning with the Under 13/2 Warrandyte Stingers team up against Doncaster Youth Club Kool Kats. The Stingers were quietly confident going into the Grand Final, having already defeated their opponents by eight goals in the semi final.

The match was tight throughout the first half with the teams going goal for goal. However, the game changed in the third quarter with the Warrandyte goalies putting on a number of scores in quick succession to give them momentum into the fourth quarter. The team morale quickly lifted as more and more goals went in and the Stingers eventually claimed victory by 18 goals.

P32netball - Under 13 2 Stingers

Under 13/2 Warrandyte Stingers

Later in the morning two Under 15s teams took the court. The Under 15/1 Warrandyte Pythons were to play their long-time rivals Donvale Dominatorz.

With just one loss for the season, Donvale was firm favourite for the premiership, but unfortunately for the Dominatorz the Warrandyte Pythons hadn’t read the script.

The Pythons went in hard and played to win, displaying strong defense in a well umpired game. Warrandyte’s fight proved too much for Donvale in defeating them for the first time this season (by eight goals) when it really mattered.

In another Warrandyte versus Donvale match up, the U15/3 Warrandyte Cobras took on the Donvale Dollz, a rematch of the semi final which Donvale dominated, winning 39-16. With that in mind, Warrandyte came out fighting and was up by six goals at quarter time.

The game was tighter in the second and third quarters and with only eight players on court, Warrandyte dug deep and fought to maintain a one goal advantage at three quarter time. In the last quarter, the game went goal for goal. With only minutes to spare and the score drawn, Warrandyte fought hard and stole the ball to sink the final goal to claim a classic final win.

P32netball Under 15 3 Cobras

U15/3 Warrandyte Cobras

After lunch three Under 17 teams took the court. Never before had the Under 17/1 Warrandyte Jaguars beaten the Deep Creek Crystals. The semi final meeting was one to forget for Warrandyte, with Deep Creek winning convincingly 53-22. The girls went in with a positive attitude and nothing to lose, and cool heads once again prevailed with a fairytale victory for Warrandyte in a nailbiter. Cheers were heard far and wide as the players jumped all over each other to celebrate a two-goal win.

P32netball - Under 17 1 Jaguars

Under 17/1 Warrandyte Jaguars

The U17/2’s Warrandyte Leopards took on Deep Creek Aquamarines. During the season the two teams had a tight tussle for first and second spot on the ladder and met each other in the semi final where the Leopards won to progress. Deep Creek was able 
to fight through the elimination final to face Warrandyte again, this time at the big dance. With just seven players, the Leopards showed strong fight but lost in an arm wrestle, succumbing by four goals.

In our only match up for the day against Eltham, the Under 17/3 Warrandyte Lynx faced the Eltham Firebirds. With only four teams in the section, the teams knew each other well and in previous meetings the Lynx had beaten Eltham only once. Going in as underdogs, the girls played a wonderful game of netball and the mateship between the girls was unparalleled. It was a close game for three quarters but the Lynx fell by six goals.

With the junior finals concluded, the Open teams took the court 
in the afternoon. The Open A Warrandyte Falcons took on the Deep Creek Diamonds, whose only loss for the season came against Warrandyte in Round 8. The game was always going to be hard fought and emotionally charged, as it was Amie Dusting’s 400th game for Warrandyte Netball Club.

With composure and plenty of support from parents, Warrandyte brought home the win to celebrate another great milestone for Amie and break a six-year drought for the Open A team.

P32netball - Open A Falcons

Open A Warrandyte Falcons

Coming into the finals season, the Warrandyte Open B Tigers were clear favourites, remaining undefeated for the season. However, they received a reality check in the semi finals, losing to the East Doncaster Jets by four goals. That forced the Tigers to play Warrandyte Hawks in the elimination final, which they managed to win by three goals. When the Tigers and the Jets met again in the Grand Final, it was the Tigers turn to growl, beating East Doncaster by 16 goals.

P32netball - Open B Tigers

Open B Warrandyte Tigers

In the Open C section, Donvale loomed as the team to be reckoned with. Sitting on top of the ladder after a flawless season, they were the team to beat in the Grand Final after the Warrandyte Red Robins girls won a very convincing semi final game against DYC to reach the event.

The Red Robins were confident and knew if they played their own game they could beat Donvale and that’s exactly how it panned out. The fourth quarter saw the Red Robins overtake Donvale’s score and run away with a terrific four-point win.

P32netball - Open C Red Robins

Open C Warrandyte Red Robins

That win was Warrandyte’s seventh and final premiership win for the day, a remarkable achievement in the eyes of president Meaghan Cross.

“It has been a great day of netball for Warrandyte and has capped off another terrific season. The club is going from strength
to strength with recent seasons seeing record numbers of players and teams,” Cross said.