Monthly Archives: August 2015

Multi-use stadium permit submitted


MANNINGHAM City Council has applied for a planning permit for the proposed $17.9 million multi-use stadium at Mullum Mullum Reserve.

The stadium plans include five multi-use sports courts, seating for up to 500 spectators, amenities and a café. The facility will cater for a range of sports such as basketball, netball, badminton and volleyball. The facility will be critical to addressing the shortage of court space throughout the area.

Manningham chief executive officer Joe Carbone said the stadium development was a key feature of the Mullum Mullum Reserve Management Plan. The plan also proposes additional improvements at the reserve including upgrades to the existing sporting facilities, improvements to landscaping and the construction of better pedestrian and cycling links throughout the reserve.

“Manningham has a growing demand for court space for a range of sports including basketball, netball, gymnastics, badminton and table tennis, so the stadium development will play a pivotal role in freeing up valuable space at our other highball stadiums,” Mr Carbone said.

The planning permit application for the construction of the stadium is on public exhibition from Wednesday August 19 until Wednesday September 9. Submissions should be made during that time, however council can consider all submissions up until the day a decision is made on the application.

As part of the exhibition and planning permit application process, a community drop-in session will be held at the Donvale Hockey and Bowls Pavilion at the Mullum Mullum Reserve, at the corner of Reynolds and Springvale Roads, between 2pm and 4pm, and 6pm and 8pm on Wednesday August 26.

Members of the community are invited to attend the community drop-in session to speak to the project architects, specialist technical consultants and council officers.Following the public exhibition period, a report will be prepared for Council to make a formal decision on the planning permit application. Subject to planning approval, construction of the stadium would commence in late 2016, with the facility expected to be open to the public by the middle of 2018.

For more information on the planning permit application:

  • Visit yoursaymanningham.com.au/MullumMullumReserveManagementPlan to view a copy of the application and plans, acoustic report, traffic report and sustainability report
  • View a hard copy of the application and plans at the Manningham Civic Centre, 699 Doncaster Road, Doncaster, between 8.00 am and 5.00 pm from Monday to Friday
  • Call Council’s Statutory Planning Unit on 9840 9333.

Submissions must be made in writing and include the submitter’s name and address. To make a submission, either:

Drop your written submission in to the Manningham Civic Centre, 699 Doncaster Road, Doncaster.

VIDEO: Jock Macneish’s life in cartoons

The Warrandyte Historical Society presents ‘A Cartoonist’s Insight into Living in Warrandyte,’ an inspiring and amusing presentation by Jock Macneish. The Diary captured the event and spoke to Jock and a few people of interest about his presentation.

Venom glory as Youth Men claim title


WARRANDYTE Venom ended the season with a massive weekend just passed, with both the women and men’s youth league sides competing in Big V finals for a mixed bag.

The boys team took home an inaugural championship for the Venom Youth Men, but unfortunately, though playing brilliantly, the girls just fell short but have done them- selves, the club and the community proud with great displays of talent, sportsmanship and mateship.

The huge crowd at Warrandyte Sports Complex on Saturday night witnessed not only a terrific game of high-spirited basketball, but also a historic win for the Venom. The first title for the men’s side of the program was a landmark victory for the 15 players involved in the 2015 team and also a reflection on the entire junior boys program at Warrandyte that feeds the Big V element.

Playing the talented Mornington Breakers, it was always set to be a physical affair. The young Venom team was ruthless with its attack on the basketball and hunger for the contest. In a tightly contested match with many ebbs and flows, the Venom claimed victory 79-70 after 40 gruelling minutes.

In a terrific team performance certain individuals also stamped their authority on the game: Justin Ronan-Black finished with 19 points, Nick Spicer had 15 and there were three other players registering double-digit scores.

The defensive efforts and overall court attack by Callum Langmaid landed him grand final MVP recognition, having racked up eight assists and five steals.

The club and community can look forward to seeing the first Big V Men’s championship banner unveiled at the Warrandyte Sports Complex in the coming weeks.

After limited sleep after the excitement of Saturday night’s game, the Warrandyte Venom faithful then made the journey to Broadmeadows stadium on Sunday to support the Youth League Women.

The team was out to conquer title favourites Hume City Broncos on their home floor, a tough ask given the Broncos finished the campaign with a 20-1 season record.

The Broncos came out early and notched a handy double-digit lead, but the typical Venom competitiveness kicked in to make it clear they were up to the task. The game was a physical and strategic affair and both sides were relentless with ball pressure.

The Venom players fought admirably to reduce the deficit to single figures but were unable to break the Broncos down, eventually falling 60-46.

Venom’s Simone Caruana finished the game on 14 points and eight rebounds, while Maddie Taylor added 10 points and seven boards. There were a number of other contributors in the spirited defeat and the Venom women certainly took it to their opposition to finish a terrific campaign.

Another wonderful year for Warrandyte in the Big V competition will be commemorated with two big celebratory occasions in the coming weeks.

Sunday August 23 from 3pm to 6pm the Venom Big V Awards function will be held at the Grand Hotel Warrandyte with everyone welcome.

Warrandyte doctor opens her heart


GETTING across the message that every hour a woman in Australia dies of heart disease, so every day 24 lives will be lost, is a top priority for Dr Linda Worrall-Carter who has formed non-profit organisation, Her Heart.

With a background in nursing, teaching and research, the Warrandyte resident has become an expert in women’s heart health and is a leading authority in Australia on cardiovascular disease in women.

CHERIE MOSELEN spoke with Dr Worrall-Carter about her big new endeavour.

Q. Cherie M: I understand you gave up a professorial role at St Vincent’s Hospital to start this new organisation?

A. Dr Worrall-Carter: Yes, it was a big decision for me, but I felt I really needed to do it. Most people don’t realise heart disease is the single biggest killer of women in Australia. I’ve carried out research in this field for almost 15 years and have learnt women mostly believe two things: that breast cancer is more likely to kill them than heart disease and that men need to worry more about heart problems than women. I want to change these misconceptions and provide resources for women to reduce their risks, because heart disease actually kills more women in Australia than all cancers combined. But the good news is, 80% of heart disease in women is preventable.

Q: Why then, are so many women dying from it?

A: Heart disease is simply not on women’s radar. I’ve published exten- sively and spoken at forums about this silent killer for years and it’s become clear to me – we don’t need more research but strong national campaigns to raise better awareness.

Women are still shamefully under-represented in research studies and poorer treatment outcomes make them 38% more likely to die in the year following a cardiac event.

I have a family history of heart disease and I’m a mum of two teenage daughters, so I’ve been urging my own family to be proactive about their risk. But when a friend said, “it’s all well and good that you have this knowledge, but most women don’t”, I realised more could be done.

That’s why I started Her Heart.

Q: What are Her Heart’s objectives?

A: Her Heart aims to offer educational programs, activities and events, also to advocate for national action on women and heart disease. It will reach out to women using social media and selected print, radio and television media.

Nothing like it currently exists in Australia – an organisation solely focused on raising awareness of the prevalence, risk factors and symptoms of heart disease in women.

Today, more than 90% of women in Australia have at least one risk factor for heart disease, as many as 50% have two or more. Meanwhile, it’s estimated the number of women over 65 in Australia will more than double in the next decade, so women need this information now more than ever.

Q: Pink ribbons are the hallmark we associate with breast cancer advocacy. How will we know its Her Heart?

A: Around the world, the universal colour for Heart Disease is red and the logos often (but not always) include hearts. Our branding supports both and has a beautiful red heart. We support the international Go Red for Women campaign (also supported by The Heart Foundation), which is known by its red dress.

Q: How will you fund the organisation?

A: Through my professional and research collaborations, I’ve developed extensive international links and affiliations, so I anticipate sourcing a variety of funding by way of government submissions and philanthropic avenues.

In 2014, I was invited to act as a program leader for the World Heart Federation and Congress of Cardiology with over 8000 delegates and have since been collaborating with Professor Noel Bairey-Merz and her ambassador Barbara Streisand from the US, who have a strong Women and Heart Disease campaign. All these connections will be extremely helpful as the organisation moves forward.

Q: What steps have you taken so far, in getting your message out there?

A: A Her Heart website was the obvious place to start (with links to other social media platforms), because women are strong social media users.
However, people tend to suffer

from information overload these days, so I’ve taken care in making the site accessible. Rather than heavy, medical language, it’s filled with easy-to-read articles, videos and user-friendly tools to calculate risk factors.

Most importantly, it focuses on just three key messages around women and heart disease: Know the signs and your risk. Change your lifestyle, if needed. Maintain your wellbeing.

Google analytics showed that people from 50 countries accessed the website in the first three weeks and in 25 of those countries, visitors spent more than four minutes exploring its content. I’m told that’s really good going for a new website, so I’m thrilled!

Q: If you could say one thing to emphasise your message about women and hear t disease, it would be…?

A: On the website, I talk about how important it is to connect, recharge and unplug. Women tend to leave themselves last. Unfortunately, that can be fatal. So, I would say: spend some time prioritising ‘me’.

For more information, visit the website: www.herheart.org.au

The Cliffy is here


WARRANDYTE is renowned for its creative types and now the Warrandyte Diary is calling all aspiring writers, young and old, to enter The Cliffy, a new short story com- petition to be held annually.

The Cliffy aims to celebrate and honour the contribution to Australian writing made by Cliff Green (OAM, inset) and to promote the skill of writing and the pleasure of reading in the community.

The competition is open to everyone and will be judged by a panel representing the Warrandyte Diary and the Warrandyte Library.

The entries can be submitted by email as a word document and are to be strictly limited to 1000 words. There will be no restrictions on subject, however, the entry must be suitable for un-edited publication in the Warrandyte Diary and on the Diary website.

The competition is advertised (below) and was officially opened at the start of this month and will close by 5pm on November 30.
The winner will be announced
at the Warrandyte Festival Grand Read event next year (March) and the winner will be given the opportunity to present the material at the event.
 Successful entries will be published in the Warrandyte Diary and the winner will receive prizes in the form of book tokens from major bookshops.

The value of the tokens is yet to be determined but expected to be about $250.

Of course, in addition to the tokens, the winner will be officially presented with The Cliffy figurine.

WARRANDYTE is renowned for its creative types and now the Warrandyte Diary is calling all aspiring writers, young and old, to enter The Cliffy, a new short story com- petition to be held annually.

The Cliffy aims to celebrate and honour the contribution to Australian writing made by Cliff Green (OAM, inset) and to promote the skill of writing and the pleasure of reading in the community.

The competition is open to everyone and will be judged by a panel representing the Warrandyte Diary and the Warrandyte Library.

The entries can be submitted by email as a word document and are to be strictly limited to 1000 words. There will be no restrictions on subject, however, the entry must be suitable for un-edited publica- tion in the Warrandyte Diary and on the Diary website.

The competition is advertised (below) and was officially opened at the start of this month and will close by 5pm on November 30.
The winner will be announced
at the Warrandyte Festival Grand Read event next year (March) and the winner will be given the opportunity to present the material at the event.
Successful entries will be published in the Warrandyte Diary and the winner will receive prizes in the form of book tokens from major bookshops.

The value of the tokens is yet to be determined but expected to be about $250.

Of course, in addition to the tokens, the winner will be officially presented with The Cliffy figurine.

 

Too funny for words


DIARY cartoonist Jock Macneish is a gifted artist.

His Warrandyte Festival logos, superbly drawn to capture the iconic presence of the Yarra River within each theme’s graphic, have been a hallmark here for almost 40 years. He also paints an exquisite watercolour.

However, it was Jock’s brilliance as a cartoonist that lit up audi- ence members at a presentation by Warrandyte Historical Society last month.

Illustrated by just 30 of almost 2000 cartoons he has drawn for the Diary since it’s first edition, Jock’s talk covered the local paper, the community, the role of Warrandyte Historical Society “and a bunch of other stuff”.

His keen impressions of “this wonderful community” filled the hall at North Warrandyte with laughter and earned a nod from many who recognised themselves in more than one cartoon. While his observations carried with them a thought-provoking message about care and identity, two concepts Jock believes make Warrandyte a great place to live.

“Communities are the things we do and the things we share because we care for people and for the good of the place,” Jock said. “Warrandyte is a fortunate location, populated by a fortunate people who have what is known as a ‘care surplus’.

“Although we think of Warrandyte as the ‘home of the artist’, in fact it would be more accurate to describe the Warrandyte house as the ‘unfinished symphony’,” he joked. “Probably a result of homeowners spending far too much time at community working bees.”

About identity, Jock said:

“Warrandyte Historical Society does an excellent job of letting us know who we were and Warrandyte Diary is, and has been, an ideal way of finding out who we are. As to who we are becoming…”

“Tomorrow belongs to that happy band of mumbling, awkward, slightly smelly bunch of teenagers you’ll find slouching about in school play- grounds and skate parks,” he said. “I can’t understand much of what they are saying, but I do know that by growing up in Warrandyte they are acquiring an identity, which will serve them well throughout their lives. And they’re absorbing a capacity to care for people and place which is second to none.”

Although he’s “never really thought of himself as a cartoonist” because he “does so many other things” (like being an architect, author, artist and illustrator who spent 20 years working in media broadcasting and another 20 years as an independent communications consultant), Jock told the Diary he has “drawn cartoons for a living.” From 1969-70, Jock was the daily pocket cartoonist at short-lived Melbourne evening newspaper Newsday, alongside feature cartoonist Michael Leunig of today’s Age.

He was also the cartoonist for Papua New Guinea’s national newspaper the Post Courier, from 1973-75.

Outwardly, cartoons about Warrandyte, about anything, might look easy to create, but are they? I asked Jock to draw me a picture.

“The powerful thing about cartoons is that visually they are all about recognition, but cognitively they are about revelation. Cartoonists try to reveal aspects of the human condition and express those in a form of visual shorthand – a cartoon,” he explained.

“They ‘see’ what’s going on in the slightly more obscure world of human behaviour, the subtle inter-relationships between people and place that make up, say, the Warrandyte community.”

“Anyone living here can recognise Warrandyte at a glance, but actually ‘seeing’ is much more difficult. Seeing Warrandyte’s shapes and textures, its colours and its shadows is what artists do.”

(No, Jock. Seriously. I meant draw me a picture.)

While visual communication is undoubtedly Jock’s strong suit, the talented artist’s parting words were equally insightful.

“It’s been a privilege, having been part of recording ‘what happened’ to Warrandyte over the past 46 years,” he said. “It’s taught me how to better care for people and for the good of the place. It’s shaped my identity.”

True ‘friends’ of our state park


THE Friends of Warrandyte State Park (FOWSP) is a volunteer-based group that understands the importance of growing indigenous plants in our gardens. We can’t underestimate the group’s value to the community.

The nursery grows plants indigenous to the area not only to conserve these important species but also to try and encourage people to plant them in their own gardens. Too often we see garden runaways such as Pittosporum and Agapanthus invading the territory of beautiful native orchids, Eucalypts and other natural splendours.

‘Friends’ groups such as our Warrandyte team are of such value to the priceless bushland in our area.

They never get tired of pulling weeds and planting important indigenous plants around the park. The habitat created and improved by FOWSP will continue to house all types of native creatures from phascogales and sugar gliders to powerful owls; even the native bees are taken good care of.

Linda Rogan, an active member of FOWSP, reflects upon her time volunteering and believes she has “found a wonderful supportive community of people from various backgrounds, including enthusiastic youngsters as well as us elders, all with the common goal of supporting the State Park, the rangers and the local flora and fauna”. She says “FOWSP is now an important part of my active life”.

Linda joined FOWSP with the intention of “learning more about our indigenous flora and to do something positive for our local natural environment” and ended up becoming the newsletter editor and finding herself immersed in learning about the state park.

FOWSP has had many successes around the park including creating a wetland frog habitat near the nursery and revegetating many disturbed areas.

From my own personal experience it is so rewarding being part of this team. Every time I go out with them I feel like I have given something back to the environment and an area, which I enjoy visiting often.

As a great bonus the people are amazing and so much fun to be around and the morning tea is always astounding.

The state parks in Warrandyte are an integral piece in a much larger puzzle. The importance of it being looked after for rare and endangered plants and animals and also for the enjoyment of you all in Warrandyte is greater than I can describe in this article. You’ll have to go out into the park, enjoy the company of the wallabies and and feel the change in the air to appreciate its true significance.

The nursery is open to the public and to anybody who wishes to volunteer on Thursdays from 9.30am until 12.30pm and on the first weekend of every month when the Warrandyte Community Market is on.

For more info visit fowsp.org.au

Warrandyte residents praised for campaign


WARRANDYTE residents demonstrated remarkable maturity and rationality when confronted with a disaster scenario last year, according to Joe Buffone, director of risk and resilience at Emergency Management Victoria.

Mr Buffone was referring to his appearance on an expert emergency services panel at the ‘What if it’s Warrandyte’ scenario event last year.

“I was expecting to get attacked from all sides for not doing enough, but people responded thoughtfully and sensibly as the disaster scenario unfolded,” he said. “It was a very well run community event”.

Mr Buffone was commenting at the Monash University Disaster Resilience Initiative conference at the end of July where the ‘Be Ready Warrandyte’ campaign was showcased.

Several other participants were generous in their praise.
“We are still using the humerous video, ‘Do you have a fire plan? In New South Wales” said Tony Jarrow of the NSW Rural Fire Service.

The video (pictured) can be viewed here

Lauren West of Surf Coast Shire said that they regularly consulted the ‘Be Ready Warrandyte’ website for information that may be useful to them. BRW also helped the Warbuton and St Andrews community and liaised with the Yarra Ranges Council Officers. The Park Orchards community is organising a similar Scenario Event for October this year which will welcome attendance from Warrandyte residents who missed last year’s event.