Monthly Archives: February 2015

Warrandyte crash leaves truck in bushes


A truck had to be pulled from the roadside after a two-vehicle collision today in South Warrandyte.

The incident involving a truck and a utility vehicle happened on the corner of Falconer and Warrandyte roads at about 7.30am today.

The driver of the utility vehicle has been issued with an infringement notice for failing to give way.

Warrandyte police said there were no injuries.

Five for Friday (Feb 27)


1. Time to grab hold of those furry balls and have a hit at the Warrandyte Tennis Club for its open day on Sunday at the clubrooms in Taroona Avenue. From 9am – 12 noon with Bar & One Pablo Tapas & Paella truck. FREE fun activities for all ages and experience. FAST4, Hot Shots, Social Play, Cardio Tennis, Targets & more.

2. Also on Sunday is the mighty Run Warrandyte at Warrandyte Reserve, with races beginning at 8am. Races include: Quinton’s SUPA IGA 2.25km; Ruby Tuesday Jewellery 4km; Harding’s Swift Caravan Services 8km; Warran Glen Garden Centre and Cafe 12km; and the Crystal Brook Tourist Park Under 8’s Oval Dash.

3. Grand Hotel Warrandyte tonight. Peter Grant’s rockin’ out, great food, cold beer, great wine, top people. Let’s go!

4. Blatant Plug for an advertiser. Warran Glen Garden Centre & Cafe – grab some plants, have a browse in the gorgeous shop and chow down in the beautiful cafe out the back where there are all sorts of goodies.

5. Diary deadline is today! All advertising and editorial copy closes as we put together another beast of an edition next week.

 

Wham, bam … Bloods smash 584!


WARRANDYTE Cricket Club’s Fourth XI smashed a new club record at home yesterday by amassing 9 for 584 in Round 14 of the Ringwood & District Cricket Association.

Scoresby Ferndale were left standing shell-shocked after the Bloods went on a rampage with Jimmy Weatherley leading the charge with 190 (22 fours and 7 sixes), and he was ably supported by fellow smashing machines Dylan Burns 75, Aaron Closs 58 and Brandon Stafford 50.

Ben Sproat must have given his crystal ball a good rub early in the day when he posted a note to the club’s Facebook page, tipping: “Expecting the 4s to make at least 400.”

Find out more in the next edition of the Warrandyte Diary when Ryan Hoiberg delivers his monthly report.

 

Five For Friday (February 20, 2015)


1. The French return and so does Warrandyte’s annual Pottery Expo on the riverbank all weekend, Saturday and Sunday, as eight French and 50 of Australia’s finest ceramic artists present and sell their work. For more visit www.potteryexpo.com

2. The Junior Bloods are back! Official season launch for the Warrandyte Junior Football Club as they get down and dirty at Clifford Park on Sunday at the Challenge Valley adventure obstacle course.

3. The Warrandyte Uniting Church are whipping up a storm in the pancakes department, out the front of Quinton’s IGA tomorrow (Saturday).

4. The Grand Hotel Warrandyte will be rockin’ again tonight with the Long Gone Daddys. Be there.

5. Blatant plug for one of our loyal advertisers – how’s your mouth health, Ralph? Keep Smiling can sort you out for natural looking dentures, relines and repairs, laminated mouthguards (footy season is starting, after all!), and all with on the spot health claims. Call Jacqueline Bell on 9844 4321.

 

 

Drivers ignore “no U-turn” sign near Anderson’s Creek Primary School


PARENTS of students at Anderson’s Creek Primary School have raised concerns about drivers not paying attention to the new “No U-turn” sign at the intersection of Colin Ave and Drysdale Road in Warrandyte.

One mum said: “Obviously people are not so observant as they are still completing their U-turns even with the new sign there. We’re hoping to get the police to enfore it as drivers are just totally ignoring it. A child is going to get seriously hurt or worse if people don’t stop doing the U-turns.”

The no U-turn sign applies to all times, day and night, and not just during school hours.

Tale of three rivers


IN late November and early December 1934, the Yarra River at Warrandyte rose to its highest recorded level, lifting to beyond a metre above the decking of the old wooden bridge. Homes, orchards and shops were inundated.

I was born in December 1934 at the Queen Victoria Hospital in Melbourne. The Yarra River did not touch my life until several decades later.

My first river was the Maribyrnong. Not the polluted, sluggish stream that then flowed through Footscray, but the near-pristine river that twisted its way across the Keilor plain, its passage marked by the River Redgums and Yellow Box trees that lined its banks, emerging into the edge of suburbia beyond the open paddocks, outback from North Sunshine.

Unbeknown to our parents we walked there. I was a small boy at the time, battling to keep up with the big kids. It seemed a very long way. Finally we reached our destination: a high, elevated railway bridge that crossed the river as it cut through its gorge, away down below.

Beneath the bridge hung a narrow pedestrian walkway, perilously close to the dual railway tracks above. This was our ultimate objective, to cross the walkway while a train thundered above. I was terrified. But no-one “squibbed”.

Goods trains were frequent, as the bridge was on a direct line to the north. Occasionally one of these interminably long trains was hauled by “Heavy Harry”, one of the world’s largest railway engines, built at the Newport Railway Workshops. Some were loaded with tanks, Bren gun carriers, field artillery, wingless fighter planes; all the hardware of conflict, for World War II was its height and Australia was under dire threat.

We crouched on the walkway as trains thundered overhead, deafened by the noise, scalded by steam, singed by flying cinders, longing for – and dreading – the moment when the engine would sound its whistle. And it always did.

My first introduction to the Murray River came via a railway train, the overnight sleeper to Mildura. I awoke at dawn, and from my upper bunk watched entranced as the sun arose, through the silhouette of a row of spindly gum trees, etched black against the early morning sky. We crossed the Murray later that morning and I marveled as the wide brown river rolled majestically through the Mallee towards South Australia on its way to the sea.

We travelled up and down the river on several occasions during that holiday, smelling the smoke and the oil-soaked steam, marveling at the great paddle-wheels churning the green water, admiring the deckhand as he leapt with the coil of rope from deck to wharf, envying the captain as he swung the big wheel in the wheelhouse, identifying with the oil-soaked engineer as he threw logs into the leaping flames in the firebox, pulling levers and twisting valves, following directions telegraphed from the wheelhouse above.

So impressed was I with life on the Murray, that when we reached home I spent the next weeks turning the woodpile beside our house into a full-blown paddle-steamer. An old bicycle wheel became the steering wheel and planks and logs became decks, a steep ladder stood in as a companionway and two more bike wheels were transformed into paddlewheels. I recruited a crew from the neighbourhood kids and we steamed the mighty river from the mountains to the sea, battling floods and fires and bushrangers.

My taste for Murray River water was far from sated, so when, decades later, the one-teacher primary school at Torrumbarry on the Murray, some 15 miles downstream from Echuca was declared vacant, I applied and gained the position.

My years on the Murray were among my happiest, and out of them grew a 40-minute children’s film, an educational documentary and my Riverboat Bill series of children’s books.

A new career now required a move closer to Melbourne. We crossed the bridge and headed off down Yarra Street for our exploratory look at Warrandyte: the Mechanics Institute, the picturesque shops, the tree-lined street, and above all, tantalising glimpses of the Yarra River. We were home.

VIDEO: Warrandyte chooks


The Diary checks out some chooks and their owners to see what has Warrandyte buzzing about free-range chickens … and a few ducks!

Setting a wonderful eggs-ample


Warrandyte chicken“YOU must never run out of eggs,” is the common response when people know you have chickens.

However, for many Warrandytians, it’s not about the eggs. There are so many delightful reasons for having chickens, with eggs being a bonus.

Adjoining neighbours Adata and John share several chickens between their homes with a mobile coop made from the frame of an old barbeque, a shipping box and pallets. The result is a cleverly designed home for Scarlet, Darling, Lucy, Beautiful Girl, Belina and Bob that for the past two years has been moved from home to home on a roster basis.

If one family is away on a holiday, the other family is able to care for them.

“When you rent, it’s hard to ask a landlord for permission to build a permanent structure,” says John. “This way we can have chickens and share them with our friends.”

Emil, Marcel, Nell and Natalia all help with caring for the chickens, including collecting the eggs, putting them away at night and topping up the water, especially on hot days.

“They all have different temperaments and personalities,” says Agata. “They are curious and adventurous and a little cheeky sometimes by trying to get into the veggie garden.”

Mother of two, Natalie, from North Warrandyte has converted an old cubby into a sweet little home safe from foxes for her Rhode Island Reds – Poeey, Twinkles, Sparkles and My Chicken. Laying well means they often have more eggs than they need and either swap the eggs for other produce with friends or give them away.

Natalie and husband Ben’s aim is to upgrade the coop by designing a way for them to eat more grass which improves their Omega 6 balance.

Warrandyte chickens“Having chickens is calming. You start pottering and realise you are part of the circle of life and reconnecting with the fundamentals of living,” says Natalie.

Lynda not only has chickens but a number of charismatic ducks, the boss of the roost being Barry. They all live together in the Taj Mahal of coops that has been added to and improved over the years to accommodate the chickens and ducks as well as keep out the foxes.

“I’d recommend digging well down into the ground with your wire, at least 500mm to keep them out and I’ve also concreted part of the coop floor to keep out the rats,” says Lynda.

“Wasps aren’t too much of a problem if I avoid putting out too many food scraps.”

With both the chickens and ducks as good layers, Lynda used to sell her freerange eggs at work as they were in such demand – as Julie Quinton quickly discovered at our local IGA supermarket after banning caged hen eggs and stocking only freerange.

Currently, Daphne is broody and has been sitting on the duck eggs for a while, which will probably hatch in the next few days.

In the meantime, 5kg Barry is quite the stud with his harem of stunning white companions Daphne, Lulu and Lizzie.

On the side of a hill, facing north and overlooking the Yarra, lives an eclectic family of chickens.

Annette Lion has owned chickens and ducks for 14 years.

“Each duck has their own personality,” says Annette, as a collection of Bantams, Light Sussex and Pom Pom Heads saunter free around the garden.

With names like Carlotta, Bluebell and Nessie it’s easy to see why Annette’s daughters Luna and Mikaia enjoy having their chickens around.

They are so tame, they’ll even sit on their heads.

We couldn’t find Speckles but she turned up later in the day, having been gone for 10 days. Annette found her sitting on 12 eggs!

It’s obvious that the bonuses of owning chickens is not just the eggs but showing children where food comes from, how to care for them, how they can produce great fertiliser for the garden and the sheer entertainment of watching their antics.

Warrandyte chickens

If you’d like to share your own chicken stories, please tell us at the Diary by emailing info@warrandyte diary.com.au

VIDEO: See our chooks story on Diary TV at warrandytediary.com.au

EPA called in to investigate


VICTORIA’S Environment Protection Authority (EPA) followed up a request from local CFA officers to investigate the cause of spontaneous fire eruptions in Park Orchards recently.

CFA crews were called to Stintons Reserve twice in six weeks to attend to fire incidents that appear to have been ignited by “self-combusting material”.

“We asked the EPA to inspect the site to determine the cause of the eruptions, as our fire investigation team were satisfied they were not deliberately lit,” South Warrandyte CFA captain Greg Kennedy told the Diary.

The fires ignited at the reserve’s fenced-off greyhound slipping track. The reserve is above the original site of the Park Orchards tip, which closed in the early 1990s.

The track has been free of fire incidents since its inception about 12 years ago.

Mr Kennedy stressed it was purely a precautionary measure.

“I felt a bit uneasy given the history of the reserve and the fact that it happened twice in a matter of six weeks,” he said.

An EPA spokesperson said they had attended the site along with Manningham council officers and determined the cause of the outbreaks to be naturally occurring decomposition. He advised that they eliminated “the possibility of a sub-surface fire”.

“The fire was caused by a mixture of decomposing organic matter (sawdust in this case), generating enough heat to ignite the sawdust,” he said.

The fires caused concern about methane leaks among Park Orchards residents, as reported on 3AW’s Rumour File program.

That was understandable given what happened at a Cranbourne landfill several years ago.

A methane issue resulted in a class action against the City of Casey and the EPA that saw residents awarded $23.5 million in compensation.

Many such domestic waste dumps (including Stintons Reserve) were closed over before the introduction of more stringent regulations in 2004, requiring all landfills to be lined to provide leak protection.

The EPA subsequently reviewed metropolitan landfills, putting councils on notice to clean up sites where pollution of land or groundwater posed a potential risk to human health.

In 2013, the environmental watch- dog issued a pollution abatement notice to Manningham council.

The EPA issued the warning after con- ducting a compliance inspection at Stintons Reserve to assess management of contaminants leaking from the closed landfill.

The notice, which was later amend- ed to allow additional time for the works to be completed, stated: “Water sampling results and an assessment of the pipe integrity shows leachate from the landfill is contaminating the surface water piped beneath the landfill and the surrounding ground.”

It also stipulated: “… that this non-compliance, or likely non-compliance, must be remedied.”

Manningham council’s director of assets and engineering Leigh Harrison said the landfill had been rehabilitated in accordance with applicable standards at that time.

He confirmed that council had been “progressively upgrading” management of the site over the past 12 months “to accord with current standards”.

Mr Harrison said: “The present situation offers no threat to the health of those persons using the oval, BMX facility or the slipping track. The works will simply result in a renewed, and improved, leachate management system.”

With regard to recent fire activity at the site, Mr Harrison was adamant there was “no evidence of any issue with methane generation from the landfill contributing to these issues”.

The EPA pollution abatement notice stipulates that all relevant works must be completed by May 31 2015.

The arrival of warmer weather has also triggered community fears of recurring spontaneous fire activity at the slipping track.

Manningham council advised: “Council has spoken to the club and suggested that the track surface, which becomes compacted, be ‘turned over’ on a semi regular basis throughout the year and especially the summer months.”

Rabbits on the hop

BRADLEYS Lane residents have launched a campaign to rid their street of rabbits, saying they are destroying gardens, causing erosion along the banks of the Yarra River and competing with native wildlife for food and habitat.

A group of residents have held a meeting with Nillumbik council hoping to mobilise local support for a pest controller to come out in March or April to bait the rabbits with Pindone, a poison commonly used to control rabbits in Victoria.

Their proposed baiting program would require around 20 days, with the poison generally taking six to 10 days to work, affecting the rabbits’ livers and causing them to die from internal bleeding.

One of the residents leading the campaign, Janice Davies, says 20 people in her street have expressed their concerns about the damage caused by rabbits.

“Over the last year we have noticed a lot more rabbit droppings across our property,” Mrs Davies said.

“I also planted a whole lot of native grass one day and I thought I’d put barriers around them in the morning but by the time I went out the next morning the rabbits had already eaten the grass down to ground level.

“This campaign is about getting as many people in the street involved as possible. We’re taking people’s concerns on board and we’re finding out how to do it without harming pets.”

Another Bradleys Lane resident, Paul Fitzsimons, noticed rabbit numbers increasing when they started destroying his garden last year.

“We plant native vegetation to attract wildlife so when rabbits come along and eat it all, it’s very costly and very frustrating,” Paul said.

Mrs Davies says Nillumbik council has offered to pay for half of the associated costs for hiring a pest controller, bringing the cost to $60 per household.

Nillumbik mayor Helen Coleman says council regularly offers subsidies when residents form a local rabbit action group.

However, the Diary didn’t receive confirmation that council would provide assistance for Bradleys Lane residents at the time of publication.

The anti-rabbit proposal comes as Melbourne Water and Parks Victoria

plan to launch their own rabbit-baiting programs along the Yarra River and through the state park.

Janice says while Melbourne Water and Parks Victoria support the plan, they cannot provide financial assistance.

The Diar y understands residents would have a greater chance of drastically reducing the rabbit population around Bradleys Lane if they start their program around the same time that Melbourne Water and Parks Victoria commence their rabbit control program this year.

A rabbit baiting program involving the Osborne Peninsula Landcare Group about four years ago inspired

the group of Bradleys Lane residents to start informing neighbours about the issue and gauging support for a unified pest control plan.

It’s estimated about 80 percent of residents in Osborne Rd, Hamilton Rd and Koornong Cres were involved in the Osborne Peninsula Landcare Group program.

Ann Penrose, who is part of the Osborne Peninsula Landcare Group, says the high number of households involved made the program successful at reducing rabbit numbers.

“We have baited every year, usually around February or March,” Mrs Penrose said.

“For the first three years we baited the whole peninsula but eventually we managed to get the rabbit numbers down so low that we didn’t have to do all of the area.”

However, rabbits have few natural predators and with females known to have up to 14 babies per litter several times a year, Ann warns that rabbit populations can quickly become out of control.

“We have noticed there’s an increasing number of rabbits recently and we can never eliminate rabbits – only control them. That’s where educating the community comes in,” Mrs Penrose said.

“Controlling rabbit populations is on-going and it’s the residents’ responsibility to keep their properties clear of rabbits.”

Nationally, rabbits are estimated to cost more than $200 million a year in control measures and lost productivity, and as Bradleys Lane resident Cameron Bailey knows, rabbits can affect one neighbour but not the next.

“I’ve only seen one rabbit on my property in the two and a half years that I’ve been living here,” Cameron said.

“They’re not a problem on our property but I would probably support the plan because we’re all for removing non-native wildlife.”

Some have expressed reservations about the plan.

“I’d be happy to get on board if there’s enough residents on board and it’s likely to be effective,” Paul Fitzsimons said.

“In the meantime, we’ve taken our own immediate steps to address the measure. Since we put in fences everything has been fine and our chocolate lilies are starting to come up again but if you fence all of your property then there’s the issue of limiting the movement of animals.”

Others say rabbits are causing problems across Warrandyte, including Mitchell Ave, Gold Memorial Rd, West End Rd and along the Mullum Trail.

One Warrandyte resident commented on the Diary’s Facebook page that she rolled her ankle while playing cricket in her backyard in a rabbit hole that appeared overnight.

Elizabeth Wood, who lives in Stiggants St, says she has been baiting her property for years, yet rabbits are still eating away at her garden.

“I have been killing the rabbits but as I get rid of one lot a new lot move in,” Elizabeth said.

“The rabbits live in Stiggants Reserve and the church yard where there is an area of undergrowth. We have asked for it to be cleaned up to no avail at this stage.”

Campaigners hope baiting will begin in March or April, with Mrs Davies indicating the plan could still go ahead with 20 participants.

“Even with 20 residents we would still have a really good chance of reducing the damage that rabbits are causing to vegetation around our street, but of course, the more people involved the more success you’re likely to have,” she said.

Local lad bags a world title


WARRANDYTE’S dual Olympian snowboarder Scotty James has finally cracked a world title at the tender age of 20 after winning the World Championship Snowboard Halfpipe at the FIS Freestyle Skiing and Snowboarding championship in Austria.

“It was a pretty amazing experience to win,” Scotty told the Diary on Sunday. “It’s super, actually, obviously something I’ve wanted to do from a very young age. One of the really cool things about it is that snowboarding’s a very individual sport, so I’m obviously out there doing it for myself but when you’re out there for the world champs you’re also out there doing it for Australia as well. There really was a great camaraderie between us in the team all week and then just to win it made me feel very patriotic.”

Scotty is the second Aussie man to win the title in the half-pipe after nailing 91.50 points in his first run of the final. He says he was in tip-top shape going into the championships, despite being nervous.

ScottyJames1“It’s a rollercoaster of emotions you go through when you’re competing at that level, so you obviously think about what they’re going to do,” Scotty says.

“But at the end of the day I just had to worry about what I was doing. I’d talked to my coach and we talked about having the same game plan that I had for qualification. I was definitely nervous, and knowing I could potentially come away with the win meant you have to sort of calm yourself down because it can have an impact on you mentally.

“So it was a case of settling down and getting the job done, and hopefully be standing on top later and it all worked out for me fortunately. It clicked.”

With his loyal best front, Ghost the Husky, Scotty caught up with the Diary on the river behind the Warrandyte Bakery on Sunday, and the born and bred Warrandytian described the moment when he knew he’d bagged the title as a “crazy experience that was exhilarating”.

“To be honest, I didn’t really know what to do with myself,” he says, laughing.

“I’ve always dreamt of doing a victory lap and it happened at world champs. I was sitting at the top and said to my brother, ‘If I win before I’m on the podium can you tell me before I go?’ So I was sitting there and trying to block out all the noise and Tim came up to me and he did this thing (signaled No.1) to me.

“And I just jumped out of my seat and gave him a hug and I said to my coach, ‘I’ve always dreamt of doing a victory lap but I never thought it would actually happen’. He said, ‘Hey, do whatever you want!’ So I just did one air on the half-pipe and jumped out onto the deck and went down and gave everyone a big high five.

“I think it’s really cool when people come out and cheer us on, so for me to give the spectators a high five was easy.”

Scotty says although he’s based in Colorado and often travelling the globe, he says Warrandyte will always be home.

“What is there not to love about Warrandyte, I’ve lived here my whole life, so 20 years now,” Scotty told the Diary.

scotty James1“It’s an amazing little spot and every time I get a chance I tell people that . One thing I really love about it is that it has a very good family orientated feel about it – obviously I’ve lived here my whole life with my family – and being right here on the river it’s just an awesome spot.

“It’s so easy to wake up in the morning and whip down my street, go grab a great breakfast and enjoy the place, and I don’t plan on leaving any time soon, so you’ve got to deal with me a bit longer Warrandyte.”

Scotty is kicking back at home in Warrandyte this week before heading to Japan.

“I’ll head to Japan and get some snowboarding in, get some photos,” he says. “That really is a culture I want to check out. Then there’s the US Open coming up at the start of March. After that I’ll either come back here for F1 or stay over there and do this new event called Red Bull Double Pipe in Aspen.

“My calendar is all over the shop at the moment,” he says laughing.

Check out more at www.scottyjames.com.au

ENTER: Mural competition and short story


Grand Wall Entry Form

Calling all

budding

artists

THE concrete wall alongside the drive-through at the Grand Hotel Warrandyte may be looking a bit bare at the moment, but it won’t be for much longer when a grand design appears there in the near future.

All budding artists in Warrandyte are invited to design a mural to be painted on the wall, with prizes offered to the best five designs and a major prize for the winning entry.

Entries for the competition will close on March 10 and winners will be announced on stage at the Warrandyte Festival on Saturday March 21.

See more details in the advertisement on Page 28 and entry forms and conditions are available at www.warrandytediary.com.au and from www.grandhotelwarrandyte.com.au

50 great reasons to visit Warrandyte


NOTICE: This post has been updated since its original posting in 2015

 WARRANDYTE is a great place to live or visit.

In 2015, the Diary published a piece 50 great things to do in Warrandyte and even today, this is still one of our most popular pages on our website.

A lot changed in three years, a lot is still the same too.

So, for your reading pleasure, here is the 2018 version of 50 great things to do in Warrandyte.

STAY THE NIGHT

Accommodation isn’t in ample supply in Warrandyte, but that’s not to say there aren’t some great options.

Warrandyte Goldfields Bed and Breakfast, located opposite the Stonehouse Gallery at Whipstick Gully Road.

With four star RACV rating, this B&B offers a self-contained two bedroom apartment which can sleep up to five people.

Situated within the heart of the old township, guests are minutes away from Warrandyte’s history, nature, art or the towns many eating establishments.

Alternatively, Crystal Brook Tourist Park is another excellent option for those looking for something a bit more versatile and spacious.

Whether you’re keen to camp, caravan or reside in a deluxe creek-side villa, Crystal Brook Tourist Park caters for all your needs and desires — minus the expensive price tag!

And it’s on the fringe of Warrandyte in Doncaster East on Warrandyte-Heidelberg Road opposite Beasley’s Nursery.

The popularity of sites like Airbnb have not gone unnoticed with Warrandyte homeowners and a quick search of Warrandyte reveals more than 20 options for the traveller who prefers a more homely vacation experience.

PARTY TIME

Sporting a number of café/bar/pub options and with many of these holding regular “special events” or even live music, a night out is becoming increasingly more popular.

In the centre of Warrandyte there there is The Grand Hotel and its new sister establishment Next Door — which you will find next door, are great options for listening to live music or for bit of a pre-event tipple before heading off to the Mechanic’s Hall the latest offerings be that theatre or music.

At the Goldfields Plaza end of town, check out It’s 12 o’clock Somewhere, or perhaps visit The White Owl for one of their summer evening events when it transforms into The Night Owl

Don’t forget the good old Warrandyte RSL, a favourite for many thanks to its laid back atmosphere up high on the hill in Brackenbury St.

A beaut spot for a game of pool, a drink and a barbecue on the balcony, it’s also a top live entertainment venue the entire family can enjoy with acts on every second Friday night and the last Sunday of every month. 

BEST FOR FOOD & COFFEE

There is no denying that Warrandyte offers a feast for all the senses, especially your taste buds.

From excellent rustic bakeries to exquisite fine dining, Warrandyte has something to satisfy your hunger for every occasion when it comes to food.

Breakfast, lunch or dinner, Warrandyte has it covered.

Find yourself in Warrandyte on a weekday morning? Popular options include The RiverView Café, Cocoa Moon and The Warrandyte Café and The White Owl.

If you are after a quick pick-me-up, all these café’s make a great cup of coffee too.

For lunch, Warrandyte has two bakeries, The Warrandyte Bakery on Yarra Street, or Leos Bakery at Goldfields Plaza.

Want dinner? We’ve got it covered.

Indian — Nardee or Indian Affair.

Thai — Vanilla Orchid

Chinese — Mings

The Grand Hotel does some great pub grub with a good selection of vegetarian, vegan and gluten free options, or if you are after something more pizza shaped, why not try Bubbas Pizza, Zest — on the site of Red Fox Restaurant or why not head out to It’s 12 o’clock Somewhere.

Warrandyte is also home to two Fish and Chip shops — West End Fish & Chips and Seafood by the Yarra.

For the ultimate fine dining experience, why not book a table at Altair on Yarra Street.

GREAT WALKS & BIKE TRAILS

When surrounded by the beautiful bushland and scenic views that Warrandyte has to offer, the desire to go for a walk or bike ride is almost second nature.

Additionally, the hill-filled and vast landscape of our town also makes for great exercise.

So where do you start?

The tranquil walk along the Yarra River is probably the most loved and frequently used track that Warrandyte contains.

Another family-friendly track is the scenic and isolated Main Yarra Trail, where you can begin your journey from Beasley’s Teahouse and ride or walk your way towards the city.

For keen mountain bike riders however, the fire trails of fourth hill present a greater challenge.

There are some great walking trails to be found the The Pound and there is a very scenic walk from Black Flats to Jumping Creek Reserve, which can be accessed from Tills Drive.

North of the river, the Koornong Linear Reserve, off of Osbourne Road is a hidden gem as well as some nice walking an swimming spots at the end of Bradley’s Lane and The Boulevard.

Parks website is a good place to start, but also check out the Runners of Warrandyte Facebook group for advice and inspiration.

MUSEUMS & GALLERIES & INFORMATION

Warrandyte is famous for its rich history of gold mining, Indigenous roots and influential art culture.

Thus, our town has many attractions and places of interest that truly make it a special place to live and visit. For those with an interest in Warrandyte’s history, it is imperative that you visit the Warrandyte Historical Society — a small gallery that aims to preserve and celebrate the town’s past.

Follow your historical lesson with a venture down Whipstick Gully, the home to the gold mines in their original form.

Whilst you’re at it, be sure to be on the lookout for the distinctive Warrandyte listening poles. With a push of a button, listeners are taken back in time through story and song.

In addition, Warrandyte’s secondhand bookshop, Yarra Cottage Books, offers a unique, cultural experience as it showcases rare texts and first editions of books — what you might find will surprise you.

If arts and crafts are what you seek, check the Stonehouse Gallery.

Of course, we can’t have a Warrandyte and surrounds travel guide without mentioning the Information Warrandyte in Yarra Street to find out so much more on what to do and where to go.

FISHING & SWIMMING

Swimming, fishing and kayaking are the ideal outdoor recreational activities in Warrandyte, given that the Yarra River is practically on our doorstep.

The trick is to know the best spots to do so to ensure your safety.

In terms of swimming, Pound Bend is a location loves by locals who enjoy a splash.

Don’t forget your inflatable tyre and picnic — why not make a day of it?

Great fishing spots on the other hand require a bit of insider info.

Try your luck at the end of Alexander Road as there are a plenty of good spots along the river there.

Alternatively, you might find success along the river behind Stiggants Reserve, or behind the bakery where the rapids are.

If you’re lucky, you can catch Macquarie Perch, Murray Cod, eels and carp — sometimes sized 60 – 70cm believe it or not!

Be careful to remember your crocs (not the reptile variety) or water shoes though, as rocks in these areas can be sharp.

ONCE A YEAR

Warrandyte’s annual festivities present the perfect opportunity for locals to unite and for visitors to get a taste for our town’s contagious community spirit.

To get the ball rolling, the annual Warrandyte Pottery Expo celebrates and exhibits the best pottery and craft from the greatest Australian and international ceramic artists.

The expo takes place on the last weekend of February along the banks of the Yarra River.

Arguably the biggest event of the year, the Warrandyte Festival in March, is always a hit and arguably the best community festival in Australia.

Don’t miss the extravagant parade on Yarra Street, the much-loved duck race along the river and the tension-filled billy cart derby.

Not to mention great quality stalls and excellent live, local music all weekend long.

The Run Warrandyte Fun Run in the first weekend in March is a great family event from run/walkers to serious runners and the new “bushy” course is not to be missed.

Why not check out the The Stonehouse Gallery’s Teapot exhibition in August, run for its second time in 2018, this is fast becoming a regular artistic event on the town’s calendar.

DAY TRIPS WITHIN HALF AN HOUR

Warrandyte is central enough that a multitude of great day trips to nearby suburbs are reachable within half an hour. In fact, Melbourne’s CBD itself is only 40 minutes away straight down the Eastern Freeway.

For a more local adventure, however, take a drive to Eltham which is only 10 minutes northwest of Warrandyte.

Check out the Eltham War Memorial Park, which commemorates Australians involved in conflict.

It is certainly worth a visit to grasp a bit of history, pay your respects and admire the superb views.

Along similar lines, Montsalvat of Eltham is a beautiful artist colony where you can take a walk through the scenic gardens, capture some photographs of historic buildings and follow up with lunch at their own café/restaurant.

A trip out to the Yarra Valley is also a must, landing right on the half hour mark from Warrandyte.

Whether you’re a wine enthusiast or a chocoholic, the Yarra Valley has something for everyone.

The wine region is exceptional, with plenty of outstanding wineries waiting to be discovered.

The immensely popular Yarra Valley Chocolaterie and Ice-Creamery is also recommended, and serves as the ideal location for the kids. Not to forget other commendable nearby wineries, including Rob Dolan Wines. Excellent food and exquisite wines – what more could you ask for?

MARKETS

To the delight of avid market-goers, there is no shortage of vibrant, atmospheric markets within the area.

Naturally, the crowd favourite of our Facebook community is naturally the one and only Warrandyte Market, which takes place on the first Saturday of every month.

Check it out for amazing local produce, arts and crafts, plant life, homewares and excellent food and drink.

When the Warrandyte Market isn’t on, there are still plenty of options nearby including the monthly Park Orchards Farmers Market on the third Saturday each month. Popping up every Saturday, the St Andrews Market is certainly worth a visit for its cool, hippy vibes and unique buys.

Thank you to the following people who made suggestions as well as those who contributed anonymously:

Ashlee Hughes, Cara Harwood, Karin Walford, John Luttick, Angela Davies, Debbie Hodgson, Peta Ann Dibb, Grant Egan, Kaz Meady, Danae Barnes, David Schwarzer, PeteandMel Mac and Wendy Snowball.